Folder Redirection

Folder Redirection


Ace Fekay, MCT, MVP, MCITP EA, Exchange 2010 Enterprise Administrator, MCTS Windows 2008, Exchange 2010 & Exchange 2007, MCSE 2003/2000, MCSA Messaging 2003
  Microsoft Certified Trainer
  Microsoft MVP: Directory Services
  Active Directory, Exchange and Windows Infrastructure Engineer


Edit: Updated – 7/22/08
Edit: Added Troubleshooting section and a Summary section – 10/12/2009.
Edit: Broken links fixed – 11/24/09
Edit: Updated 1/22/2011 with additional information and fixed a broken link
Edit: 6/27/2011 – Added two new links, one with screenshots
Edit: 10/28/2011 – DFS section about it not being recommended or supported with Redirection
===


 


Folder Redirection Background


I believe Folder Redirection with using Offline Files is a great solution for many environments. I have it implemented in all my customer sites for laptops and desktops. I usually just opt to redirect the My Documents folder, and possibly the desktop, but I do not redirect the Application Data, Start Menu because Start Menus may be different based on what’s installed on other machines they may log onto, and the Application Data folder can grow expoentially with unwanted or uneeded data, which will  be additional data to backup on the server and the additional overhead of data and backup capacities on the server. You know how large the application folder can get, and not always a good choice to implement redirection with. Keep that in mind when you implement this feature.


It allows all their data to be available no matter which machine they logon to, as well as when new machines are deployed. There are no worries about user data being lost or deleted if using re-imaging in an environment. Just make sure all users are instructed to put all their data into the My Documents folder, and if you choose to redirect the Destop, they can also save data to the desktop, but I would rather just redirect the My Documents folder.


Therefore, depending on whwhich folders you decide to redirect, a user will get their data no matter where they login. Enabling Offline Files as well, will provide an additional performance increase on the user side, as well as the ability to take machines off-site (such as laptops) and the folks will have their data no matter where they are. As I mentioned, I usually just implement Folder Redirection with the My Documents folder, and not the others,  All data with redirection configured, as well as offline files, are cached locally and only synch up at scheduled, manually set times, when logging on, or logging off. It vastly reduces client to server traffic.


 


Implementing Folder Redirection


There are a few things that need to be setup in place to make redirection work. If in a mixed Vista/XP environment, as many are going through right now, it may be a little challenging, but they can use the same home folder setting, but the user must stick with one OS or the other, not logon to an XP, then to a Vista, or things may get skewed. You may find other ways to implement it (whether using an AD group or not, etc), but I’ve found this method successful with my implementations.


1. The user accounts need to be in the OU the Redirection Policy will apply to. It doesn’t matter where the computer accounts are. This is because Redirection is a User based Policy.


2. More than likely, the Redirection policy is probably setup to apply to a group. Therefore, make sure the  user account is part of that group.


3. Only the internal DNS servers must show up in a machine’s IP properties.


4. They way I setup the shares, is create a root folder called Users. I share it out as Users$ and set share permissions to only System=FC and Domain Admins=FC.


5. Create child folders, one for each user. The share permissions for the user must be set to Full Control, or it won’t work. For example, for a user named Bill, I create a Bill folder, then share it out as Bill$, and set the share permissions to:
Domain Admins=FC
System=FC
Bill=FC.


6. The user MUST have FC for both the share and the NTFS permissions. Therefore, I set the NTFS permissions (the Security tab) to:
Domain Admins=FC
System=FC,
Bill=FC.


6. In the user’s AD properties, Profile tab, you want to configure a home folder, and this is assuming you want their stuff redirected to the home folder, such as clicking on G, H, or whatever letter, then configuring something like \\servername\%username%$ (the $ makes it hidden). Whether to hide it or not depends on corporate SOP. The %username% is a variable that will create the folder for you, but I usually do it manually, as in the previous steps.


7. Create an AD group, call it (for example), “My Docs Redirect Group.” Create the Redirect policy based on the group membership, for example the My Documents folder, should be redirected to \\servername\username$\. You can also create it as \\servername\username$\MyDocuments Documents, which I like because their data goes into a subfolder under the user folder as My Documents. This require additional testing on your part to make sure the respective data goes into the folders you’ve specified. However, many installations simply specify the Home folder, \\servername\username$, which is easy, and and it works well. I’ve been using this method myself (outlined in the next step), however, with this method, ALL of their documents wind up directly in the root of the home folder. However, this could be a little problematic with Vista. For more info on Vista and XP in a mixed environment, and problems that may occur, please read the links at the bottom of this article that will provide additional information on how to handle this issue.


8. In the My Documents policy setting, select “Advanced – Specify Location based on various User Groups. Add the AD group you just created. For the target folder location, Redirect to the Home Folder. After you click OK, it will display a UNC in the form of: \\%HOMESERVER%%HOMEPATH%. Under the settings tab, check the box that says Grant the user exclusive rights to My Docs. Also select to Move the Contents, as well as Leave the Folder in the new location when the policy is removed.


9. I usually create a logon bat script, place it in the NETLOGON share, and specify the script name in thier AD properties, to manually map the same drive letter specified under the Profile tab for the home folder to the home folder, such as with a command line of “net use h: \\servername\username$“.


It can also be done using VB and a logon script in their GPOs. The script normally does multiple other things as well. I’m just pointing out this portion of it. It is your choice of using VB, CMD or bat files when creating a script.


10. Enable Offline Use for the redirected My Documents.


11. Repeat for the other folders, if you choose to include them. I would set them to use subfolders, such as Application Data, so the data doesn’t get intermixed with the My Docs.


12. Link the GPO to the OU you want it to apply to. Keep in mind, it will not work until you add the users that you want it to apply to, to the My Docs Redirect Group, that you’ve created.


13. If you ever need to move the Users folder location to a new server, simply mirror the shared folders and permissions from the old server on the new server drive (no need to copy the data), and change the policy to point to the new UNC. Next time the user logs on, the data will be moved automatically. The larger the amount of data, the longer it will take. For example, one customer had a 10 GB home folder. It took about 20 minutes to move, however the user was able to work. Some of the files weren’t available immediately, but they eventually showed up.




Redirecting the Desktop, My Music, Application Data, etc


For the Desktop, what I suggest is to first create a ‘Desktop” folder under each user’s folder. Then enable Destop Redirection to a specific folder, make sure the My Documents Redirect Group is specified, (based on my procedure and locations above) and set the path to \\%username%$\user$\desktop.


One issue you may come across is if you do not select to redirect My Music, simply because you don’t want that sort of stuff on the server for multiple reasons (such as drive space on the server or backup media limitations), but some of the users wise up and figure out what’s going on, and they start saving their music in their My Docs folder, you can control that using Microsoft’s FSRM.


 


Storage Reports


FSRM – File Server Resource Manager
By using File Server Resource Manager, administrators can place quotas on folders and volumes, actively screen files, and generate comprehensive storage reports:
http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc755603(WS.10).aspx





Folder Redirection with Terminal Services


Keep in mind, There’s no problem in using TS Roaming Profiles, but if you want users’ Documents and Desktops to work, you need to combine the feature with Folder Redirection on all the servers and workstations so all user folders are redirected to the same place. It’s recommended to not use Roaming Profiles because of the added complexity.


Profile and Folder Redirection In Windows 2003 (Explains the differences between a Roaming profile and a non-roaming profile, recommending to not use Roaming Profiles and just use Folder Redirection:
http://www.windowsnetworking.com/articles_tutorials/Profile-Folder-Redirection-Windows-Server-2003.html


How To Configure Folder Redirection, Aug 22, 2007
How to use Group Policy to redirect the “Desktop”, “My Documents”, “Start Menu” and “Application Data” folders.
http://www.msterminalservices.org/articles/Configure-Folder-Redirection.html


Terminal Service Administration and Folder RedirectionJ, un 6, 2006
If Remote Desktop for Administration is enabled on a server that’s running Windows Server 2003, then the server can not be configured to use …
http://www.msterminalservices.org/articles/Terminal-Service-Administration-File-Redirection.html


Using Folder Redirection with Terminal Server: Terminal Services, Mar 28, 2003
Folder Redirection allows users and administrators to redirect the path of a folder to a new location.
http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc737867(WS.10).aspx


Best practices for Folder Redirection: Group Policy, Jan 21, 2005
In general, accept the default Folder Redirection settings. Logging off the terminal server causes copying to occur in the opposite …
http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc739647(WS.10).aspx


Profile and Folder Redirection In Windows Server 2003, Mar 1, 2005 … For example, if you created a share named PROFILES on a server named TAZ, then the path to Brien’s profile … The actual folder redirection is done through the group policy. … Terminal Servers · Thin Client Servers …
http://www.windowsnetworking.com/articles_tutorials/Profile-Folder-Redirection-Windows-Server-2003.html


Folder Redirection and Terminal Server Users : 
1 author 4 posts – Last post: Jun 1, 2004 – Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.group_policy. We currently utilize folder redirection …
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/218519-46-folder-redirection-terminal-server-users


You can also configure terminal services redirection manually in the registry:


reg add “HKCU\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Explorer\User
Shell Folders” /v Personal /t reg_expand_sz /d “G:\MyDocs” /f


reg add “HKCU\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Explorer\User
Shell Folders” /v Desktop /t reg_expand_sz /d “G:\Desktop” /f


reg add “HKCU\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Explorer\User
Shell Folders” /v AppData /t reg_expand_sz /d “G:\Application Data” /f




Removing Folder Redirection


How to stop Folder Redirection in Windows Server 2003 and in Windows 2000 Server
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/888203


- Make sure you have a recent backup of the server where the redirected files are prior to making any changes. If you don’t, and this may be a good practice whether you do have a good backup or not, I would suggest to recover the files from the offline cache on the machine you want to remove from the Redirection GPO. You can do that by copying the files from the My Documents folder and any other redirected folders that are in the policy, to another location on the harddrive.  Make sure you do that prior to removing the machine from the GPO or from the domain, otherwise if there are any problems or if you have no backup, it’s may be impossible to recover them afterward.


- You will probably want to include other files from the machine that may not have been part of the Redirect policy, or even if they were, such as Favorites, Desktop items, Downloads folder, etc. One important file you may want to also copy is the Outlook nickname drop-down list file. That’s the names that show up in the drop-down lisoxt that shows up when you start typing something in the To:, Cc: and Bcc: boxes. It’s stored in a file called the <OutlookProfileName>.NK2 file and is located in:
C:\Documents and Settings\UserName\Application Data\Microsoft\Outlook


It can be copied from machine to machine. Just rename it to the Outlook profile name of the target machine.


If there are any PST files, you may want to copy them, as well. The default location is:
C:\Documents and Settings\Username\Local Settings\Application Data\Microsoft\Outlook


- Use Group Policy to set folder redirection back to the default location, which is your profile folder on the PC. You can’t just remove the policy, because the folders will stay where they are. You need to redirect them back to where they were.


- Re-initialize the offline cache. Redirected folders by default are synchronized to be available offline. That’s the little arrow in the corner of the icon. Unfortunately Offline files in XP will keep trying to synchonize until you re-initialize it.


How to re-initialize the offline files cache and database
Provides two methods to re-initialize the offline files cache and database.
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/230738


- If you used the method to use a group to control Folder Redirection, Remove the user from the folder redirect group. If not, move the user out of the OU where Folder Redirection GPO is linked to.


 


Troubleshooting Folder Redirection


Is the workstation receiving the policy?


You can first run the gpresults.exe utility on the client side to determine if the GPO is being applied.


Then I would suggest to use the GPMC to create an RSOP for specifics, such as to look for any access denied issues, etc. If the GPO is being applied and there are no denials or other issues in the RSOP, then I would look into the user’s folder configuration, permissions, UNC path, etc, set in the GPO. If that doesn’t help, basically, enabling Userenv logging can assist in troubleshooting GPO problems, including Folder Redirection. 


Userenvlog


The Userenv.log contains verbose information about policy and profile processing. It also contains additional logs such as the gptext.txt log. This logs events for Group Policy Extensions such as for folder redirection. among other things. This file is located in c:\windows\debuguser mode and contains entries associated with the Userenv process. It is usually a fairly small text file since verbose logging is not enabled by default. You can find out more about the userenv.log in the following link.


Userenv and GPE logging: A great tool for debugging Group Policy Extensions
http://searchwindowsserver.techtarget.com/tip/0,289483,sid68_gci1250007,00.html


Enable logging for Folder Redirection:


Locate the following subkey: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Microsoft\WindowsNT\CurrentVersion\Diagnostics.


Create a new Reg_DWORD entry called FdeployDebugLevel and set its value to 0x0f.


The log file is created in %windir%\Debug\Usermode\Fdeploy.log.


General issues with Folder Redirection?


Here’s a good article on reparing Folder Redirection:


Repair folder redirection and shares
http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd440852(WS.10).aspx


Vista: Redirected Folders Changes The User’s Home Folder Name From the “User’s Name” to “Documents”


When you redirect the Documents folder on a Windows Vista-based computer to a network share, the folder name unexpectedly changes back to Documents
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/947222


Was the username changed in Active Directory?


You may need to make some adjustments. Take a look at the following articles for more information.


Folder Redirection Operation Is Unsuccessful When You Rename the User
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/827059


The folder redirection process fails on a computer that is running Windows Vista or Windows XP when you change the user name in Active Directory
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/953529


 Concurrent Logon Issue occurs when users logon to more than one workstation simultaneously


Some other things to keep in mind is if and when a user may logon to a different workstation while still logged on at another. This can cause an issue where if anything changes in their files from machine to machine, the ‘last man wins’ rule jumps into play. To prevent such a thing from occuring, you must instruct users to logon at one machine at a time.


If the users do not pay attention or disregard this guideline, you have a few of options at your disposal:


1.  Take a look at LimitLogon in the following links.


Microsoft releases LimitLogin v1.0. 16-Mar-05
http://windowsitpro.com/articles/index.cfm?articleid=83236


Utility Spotlight: Limit Login Attempts With LimitLoginEver needed to limit concurrent user logins in an Active Directory® domain? Ever wanted to keep track of information about every login in a domain?
http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/2005.05.utilityspotlight.aspx


LimitLogin – Tool to limit and monitor concurrent logins in a …LimitLogin is an application that adds the ability to limit concurrent user logins in an Active Directory domain. It can also keep track of all logins …
http://msmvps.com/blogs/javier/archive/2005/03/14/38557.aspx


2. The Windows 2000 Server Resource Kit has the Cconnect.exe tool to prevent users from logging on more than once. But no warning is displayed. They simply won’t be able to connect. More information can be found in the following link:


Limiting a user’s concurrent connections in Windows Server 2003 …Install the Windows 2000 Resource Kit tool named CConnect.exe on each client computer. This tool, together with an .adm file that is supplied by the tool, you can limit concurrent logins.
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/237282


3. Using the PsShutdown.exe and PsLoggedOn.exe freeware, originally included in the PSTools Suite from Sysinternals, which is now part of Microsoft. The PSTools can be downloaded free from Microsoft. With these two utilities, you can add some code in your logon script to prevent a user from logging on more than once. The code and instructions on how to use it, can be found at the following link.


How can I prevent users from logging on more than once, without using the Cconnect.exe Resource Kit Tool? 08-Dec-04
http://www.jsifaq.com/SF/Tips/Tip.aspx?id=8768


PsTools – The PsTools suite includes command-line utilities for listing the processes running on local or remote computers, running processes remotely, and much much more.
http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/sysinternals/bb896649.aspx


Windows Sysinternals: Documentation, downloads and additional information on PSTools.
http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/sysinternals/default.asp


 


EventID 510, Source = Folder Redirection:


“Folder redirection policy application has been delayed until the next logon because the group policy logon optimization is in effect.”
You can enable Folder Redirection debug logging to help narrow down the issue:
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\Diagnostics\FdeployDebugLevel REG_DWORD value=oxf


Event ID 510, Source = Folder Redirection


Folder Redirection policy application never applied completely
http://www.experts-exchange.com/OS/Microsoft_Operating_Systems/Server/Windows_Server_2008/Q_24558513.html


Folder Redirection encounters errors and redirection fails
“Folder Redirection, like Software Installation settings, can only be applied during computer startup or user logon. On computers running Windows XP with logon optimization enabled, this can mean that the user needs to log on more than once before the setting takes effect. “
http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc781863(WS.10).aspx


How Folder Redirection Extension Works
“…Because background refresh is the default behavior in Windows XP, Folder Redirection and Software Installation might require as many as three logons to apply changes. “
http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc787939(WS.10).aspx#w2k3tr_gpfdr_how_xokx


How Folder Redirection Works:
http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc787939(WS.10).aspx


Security Considerations when Configuring Folder Redirection
http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc775853(WS.10).aspx



Windows 7, roaming profiles, and waiting over a minute to logon (providing DNS configurations are correct):


Managing Roaming User Data Deployment Guide –
“Windows Trusted Platform Module Management Step-by-Step Guide …..
“At logon, Windows Vista typically waits 30 seconds for an active network, when you configure the user with a roaming user profile or remote home directory. In cases such as wireless networks, it may take more time before the network connection becomes active. Enabling this policy allows Windows to wait up to the number of seconds specified in the policy setting for an active network connection. Windows immediately proceeds with logging on the user as soon as the network connection is active or the wait time exceeds the value specified in the policy setting. Windows does not synchronize roaming user profile or connect to the remote home folder if the logon occurred before the network connection became active.”
http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc766489(WS.10).aspx


As shown in the above link, yhe 30 sec delay is “By Design”. Windows 7 & Windows Vista NLM (Network Location Management) Service running behind the user policy service, by default is set to wait for the network for 30 seconds, if a user has a Roaming User Profile or Remote Home Folder set in ADUC. In many cases, a 30 second logon may be unacceptable. This setting can be adjusted in a GPO.
 
Computer settings
   Policies
        Admin Template
             System
                   User Profiles
                        Set max wait time for the network if a user has a roaming user profile or remote home folder
 
Depending on your network, setting this time too short could result in the user not receiving the RUP or remote home folder.
 
One suggestion is if you want to keep a 7 – 10 second logon time, set the GPO to 1 sec, map the home folder with GPO Preferences and redirection takes care of the rest.



Profile Size Limits and Folder Redirection causing size limit reached error message


Do you have a GPO that limits the Profile Size? Have a look at the following KB article.


Error message may occur when you increase the maximum profile size
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/290324


Have you tried to clean up the profile on one computer to check if
notification goes away? (For example removing temporary internet files,
moving big files from my documents to network share deleting temporary files …)


From Mark D. MacLachlan:
For the benefit of others, you can eliminate the need to fix this manually on each PC by using the
following VBScript as a login script.


[code]
Dim WSHShell
Path = "HKCU\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Policies\System\EnableProfileQuota"
Set WSHShell = CreateObject("Wscript.Shell")
WSHShell.RegWrite Path, 0, "REG_DWORD"
[/code]


In case of posted line wrapping, the line starting with “Path = ” ends
with “\EnableProfileQuota” so make sure they are one line in your script.



Folder Redirect Re-targeting


Change it in GPO as well as client side reg:


“HKCU\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Explorer\User Shell Folders\Documents” = “%HomeShare%%HomePath%Documents”
http://vistavitals.blogspot.com/2007/11/folder-redirection-misbehaves-after.html


 


Notes on Roaming Profiles – Removing Roaming Profiles


You can setup a Folder Redirection GPO testing it to a test OU and a test user account that already has a Roaming profile. Once Folder Redirection is in place, you can copy the data into the My


Docs folder to allow redirection to sync it to their home folder. Once that is in place and working, you can remove the roaming profile by using the Delprof or Remprof utility.


User Profile Deletion Utility (Delprof.exe) – For Windows XP and previous operating systems
http://www.microsoft.com/download/en/details.aspx?id=5405 


Delprof2 – User Profile Deletion Tool
The unofficial successor to Microsoft’s Delprof that works with Windows Vista and newer.
http://helgeklein.com/free-tools/delprof2-user-profile-deletion-tool/


How To Delete User Profiles by Using the User Profile Deletion …
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/315411


BombProf – GUI Based Profile Management Utility
Windows Compatible – 2000\XP\2003\Vista\2008\7 & Citrix Compatible – Metaframe\Presentation Server\XenApp
Direct Download: http://www.ctrl-alt-del.com.au/files/BOMBProf.zip
(Part of the CAD Freeware Util Pack): http://www.ctrl-alt-del.com.au/CAD_TSUtils.htm#Freeware 


RemProf – Command-line utility to delete local user profiles that are NOT in use when this command is executed.
Direct Download NT\2k\2k3 edition: http://www.ctrl-alt-del.com.au/files/RemProf.zip
Direct Download w2k8/win7 edition: http://www.ctrl-alt-del.com.au/files/RemProf08.zip
Part of the CAD Freeware Util Pack: http://www.ctrl-alt-del.com.au/CAD_TSUtils.htm#Freeware  


Removing Roaming Profiles  (using delprof with example command line switches)
http://www.edugeek.net/forums/windows/16924-removing-roaming-profiles.html


How To Delete User Profiles by Using the User Profile Deletion


This website provides a short overview of the free Microsoft “Delprof” tool and the commercial “Remote Profile Cleaner” tool, inlcuding scripting examples. 
http://www.delprof.eu/ 


To delete the roaming profile folders at the server side, and this is assuming the roaming profiles location is in a different location (UNC path) than the redirected folders, first remove the roaming profile path specified in the AD user accuount. Then as an administrator, you’ll find that you won’t be able to delete the actual roaming profile folder that belongs to a user account. To perform this action, you’ll need to take ownership of the folder. Read more:


Roaming Profile Folders Do Not Allow Administrative Access
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/222043



Going from Roaming Profiles to Folder Redirection:


Roaming Profiles and Folder Redirection
http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:UU6f-dPW3nIJ:thelazyadmin.com/blogs/thelazyadmin/archive/2005/05/15/Roaming-Profiles-and-Folder-Redirection.aspx+lazyadmin+folder+redirection&cd=1&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=us&source=www.google.com  


 


 


 


DFS and Folder Redirection


This is not supported nor recommended.


Microsoft’s Support Statement Around Replicated User Profile Data
http://blogs.technet.com/b/askds/archive/2010/09/01/microsoft-s-support-statement-around-replicated-user-profile-data.aspx


Replicating User Profiles Between Sites (With or Without DFS) – Why it Should be Avoided
http://blogs.sepago.de/helge/2009/07/30/replicating-user-profiles-between-sites-with-or-without-dfs-why-it-should-be-avoided/


Roaming Profiles using DFS? – is it possible?
http://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/winserversetup/thread/af23abbc-2d35-4f92-a1c1-8068cdd74cd4/


 


Summary


- Make sure you have a recent backup of the server where the redirected files are prior to making any changes. If you don’t, and this may be a good practice whether you do have a good backup or not, I would suggest to recover the files from the offline cache on the machine you want to remove from the Redirection GPO. You can do that by copying the files from the My Documents folder and any other redirected folders that are in the policy, to another location on the harddrive.  Make sure you do that prior to removing the machine from the GPO or from the domain, otherwise if there are any problems or if you have no backup, it’s may be impossible to recover them afterward.


- You will probably want to include other files from the machine that may not have been part of the Redirect policy, or even if they were, such as Favorites, Desktop items, Downloads folder, etc.


If there are any PST files, you may want to copy them, as well. However, keep in mind, PST files, along with MDB and other database files, do not work well with Redirection. FYI, the default PST location is:
C:\Documents and Settings\Username\Local Settings\Application Data\Microsoft\Outlook


One important file you may want to also copy is the Outlook nickname drop-down list file. That’s the names that show up in the drop-down list box that shows up when you start typing something in the To:, Cc: and Bcc: boxes. Many a user will claim this is their “Address Book.” However we all know it is not, but they’ve come to rely on this feature and will complain if missing in their new profile. This file can be copied from machine to machine. Just rename it to the Outlook profile name of the target machine. It’s stored in a file called the <OutlookProfileName>.NK2 file and is located in (depending on operating system version):


XP and Windows 2000:
c:\Documents and Settings\UserName\Application data\Microsoft\Outlook


Windows Vista:
C:\Users\UserName\AppData\Roaming\Microsoft\Outlook


If Vista was upgraded from Windows XP:
C:\Documents and Settings\UserName\AppData\Roaming\Microsoft\Outlook


- Use Group Policy to set folder redirection back to the default location, which is your profile folder on the PC. You can’t just remove the policy, because the folders will stay where they are. You need to redirect them back to where they were.


- Re-initialize the offline cache. Redirected folders by default are synchronized to be available offline. That’s the little arrow in the corner of the icon. Unfortunately Offline files in XP will keep trying to synchonize until you re-initialize it.


How to re-initialize the offline files cache and database
Provides two methods to re-initialize the offline files cache and database.
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/230738


- If you used the method to use a group to control Folder Redirection, Remove the user from the folder redirect group. If not, move the user out of the OU where Folder Redirection GPO is linked to.


 


Related Links


Implementing Folder Redirection using Group Policy
http://www.tech-faq.com/implementing-folder-redirection-using-group-policy.html


Folder Redirection (with a step by step video)
http://www.folderredirection.com/


Recommendations for Folder Redirection: Group Policy
http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc785925(WS.10).aspx


Folder Redirection feature in Windows
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/232692


How To Configure Folder Redirection, Aug 22, 2007 … How to use Group Policy to redirect the “Desktop”, “My Documents”, “Start Menu” and “Application Data” folders.
www.msterminalservices.org/articles/Configure-Folder-Redirection.html


How to Configure Folder Redirection
http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc782799.aspx


How To Configure Folder Redirection
http://www.msterminalservices.org/articles/Configure-Folder-Redirection.html


User Profiles and Folder Redirection FAQ
http://www.microsoft.com/technet/community/en-us/management/manage_faq.mspx


Enabling the administrator to have access to redirected folders
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/288991


Folder Redirection in a mixed environment XP/Vista
http://www.gpanswers.com/community/viewtopic.php?t=2257


When you redirect the Documents folder on a Windows Vista-based computer to a network share, the folder name unexpectedly changes back to Documents
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/947222


Profile and Folder Redirection In Windows Server 2003 (Explains the differences between a Roaming profile and a non-roaming profile, recommending to not use Roaming Profiles and just use Folder Redirection:
http://www.windowsnetworking.com/articles_tutorials/Profile-Folder-Redirection-Windows-Server-2003.html



Ace Fekay
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