Removing capabilities from my first Windows Phone app

So, I thought I’d write a Windows Phone app using Visual Studio 2012 the other day. Just a simple little thing, to help me solve my son’s algebra homework without getting into the same binds he does (failure to copy correctly, fumbled arithmetic, you know the thing…) And I run into my first problem. The app uses no phone capabilities worth advertising – you know, things like the choice to track your location, so that the app’s install will ask the user “do you want to allow this app to have access to your location”, and you say either “allow”, or … Continue reading Removing capabilities from my first Windows Phone app

Could Google prompt Microsoft to provide easier syncing?

As a Windows Phone user, and trying to persuade my wife to one day become one (instead of the Blackberry she totes around), I’m constantly stopped by the prospect that there is no way to sync my calendar and contacts without going through some online service. This is a very strange situation, because even Apple’s iPhone can apparently synchronise Outlook contacts and calendar entries over the USB connection. Microsoft’s answer to date has always been that we should rent or borrow an Exchange Server of some sort, push our calendar and contact details to that server, and then fetch them … Continue reading Could Google prompt Microsoft to provide easier syncing?

On new exploit techniques

Last year’s discussion on “Scriptless XSS” made me realise that there are two kinds of presentation about new exploits – those that talk about a new way to trigger the exploit, and those that talk about a new way to take advantage of the exploit. Since I didn’t actually see the “Scriptless XSS” presentation at Blue Hat (not having been invited, I think it would be bad manners to just turn up), I won’t address it directly, and it’s entirely possible that much of what I say is actually irrelevant to that particular paper. I’m really being dreadfully naughty here … Continue reading On new exploit techniques