Capital ‘I’ Internet

The Atlantic today published a reminder that the Associated Press has declared in their style guide as of today that the word “Internet” will be spelt with a lowercase ‘i’ rather than an uppercase ‘I’.

The title is “Elegy for the Capital-I Internet”, but manages to be neither elegy nor eulogy, and misses the mark entirely, focusing as it does on the awe-inspiring size of the Internet being why the upper-case initial was important; then moving to describe how its sheer ubiquity should lead us to associating it with a lower-case i.

Here’s my take

The "Internet", capital I, gives the information that this is the only one of its kind, anywhere, ever. There is only one Internet. A lower-case I would indicate that there are several "internets". And, sure enough, there are several lower-class networks-of-networks (which is the definition of “internet” as a lower-case noun).

I’d like to inform the people who are engaging in this navel-gazing debate over big-I or small-i, that there functionally is only exactly one Internet. When their cable company came to "install the Internet", there was no question on the form to say "which internet do you want to connect to?" and people would have been rightly upset if there had been.

So, from that perspective, very much capital-I is still the right term for the Internet. There’s only one. Those other smaller internets are not comparable to “the Internet”.

From a technical perspective, we’re actually at the time when it’s closest to being true that there’s two internets. We’re in the midst of the long, long switch from IPv4 to IPv6. We’ve never done that before. And, while there are components of each that will talk to the other, it’s possible to describe the IPv6 and IPv4 collections of networks as two different "internets". So, maybe small-i is appropriate, but for none of the reasons this article describes.

Having said that, IPv6 engineers work really really hard to make sure that users just plain don’t notice that there’s a second internet while they’re building it, and it just feels exactly like it would if there was still only one Internet.

Again, you come back to "there is only one Internet", you don’t get to check a box that selects which of several internets you are going to connect to, it’s not like "the cloud", where there are multiple options. You are either connected to the one Internet, or you’re not connected to any internet at all.

The winner is…

Capital I, and bollocks to the argument from the associated press – lower-cased, because it’s not really that big or important, and neither is the atlantic. So, with their own arguments (which I believe are fallacious anyway), I don’t see why they deserve an upper-case initial.

The Atlantic, on the other hand – that’s huge and I wouldn’t want to cross it under my own steam.

And the Internet, different from many other internets, deserves its capital I as a designation of its singular nature. Because it’s a proper noun.

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