Small Business Susan

The moral of this HyperV story is ….

Why am I so blonde when it comes to virtual networking in HyperV?

I have 4 nics, only one in use.

I have the virtual network with the “external” selected and connected to that nic.  I’ve compared the settings I have to my HyperV box at home where I have a similar setup and yet the internal SBS will not get Internet connectivity.  I can’t figure out why it’s not connecting.

Anyone have the once again blonde instructions for Virtual networks in HyperV?


Why is HP so blonde when it comes to HyperV?  I realized that inside the network card properties that there was an HP teaming software.  HP teaming software is starting to be up there with my hatred of broadcoms.  First off do not team nics on SBS 2008.  Secondly I could not figure out WHY I could not get my HyperV/Parent/child networking talking to the Internet.  The parent could, the child would not.  

 I disabled all nic cards except for the one I was using.  I turned off everything that said “offload” or “receive side scaling”.  Still nothing.  I compared my working HyperV to my non working one at the office.  


I googled and bingled and hit Ben’s blog http://blogs.msdn.com/virtual_pc_guy/archive/2008/01/08/understanding-networking-with-hyper-v.aspx  and then when I was looking at his nic card images it hit me.  There was a HP networking helper protocol that came in with the driver update and the check box was greyed out and you couldn’t uncheck it.  Dang.  So I go looking for something in add/remove Programs and features.  Nothing.  Dang again.  Hang on, I CAN uninstall it from the networking properties [note to self in anticipation of later blogging/ranting I should have gotten a screen shot here] and I told the item to be uninstalled.  It needed a reboot of the box.  The minute the box came back up, voila.  SBS 2008 now has Internet connection like it should.

The moral of this story is MAKE SURE the nic card doesn’t have ANYTHING ELSE but bog standard stuff.  Get rid of anything HP driver ish in the nic setting properties.  And don’t do nic teaming on SBS.




1 comment so far ↓

  • #   Joe Raby on 10.30.09 at 3:08 pm     

    I build servers, but I use Intel motherboards almost exclusively because support is so good. The onboard LAN is “Intel PRO LAN 8xxxx Gbe whatever”. Anyway, it’s not Broadcom. Intel allows you to install the driver software from a setup program, but ALL of the extra stuff is optional, including the advanced device property sheet that shows up in the Device Manager. If you only want drivers, you can install JUST drivers if you want, but you can still do that from the Setup.EXE program….OR you can do an INF install – it’s your choice.

    Also, almost all Gbe Intel PRO LAN controllers are supported out of the box by Windows [Vista+] operating systems now. Whenever I need extra ports, I use Intel-branded network cards. I’ve never once had a problem with them, especially not with drivers.