Cooking up some R2 virtualization without Windows 2008 R2

Here’s the ingredients


1 HyperV Server.  The Free one.  http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?FamilyID=48359dd2-1c3d-4506-ae0a-232d0314ccf6&displaylang=en  This is a standalone no GUI that you can build R2 solutions on.  But… no GUI. Ick.  I want GUI. 


So we “make” a GUI for it.


1 Windows 7.  Must be Professional, Enterprise or Ultimate.  This is our GUI.


1 set of RSAT tools.  http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?FamilyID=7D2F6AD7-656B-4313-A005-4E344E43997D&displaylang=en


1 download of HVRemote (install on both the server and the client). 
Hyper-V Remote Management Configuration Utility – Home:
http://code.msdn.microsoft.com/HVRemote


Download all of these ingredients and let’s see what we’re planning.  One of the issues one has with the SBS 2008 premium sku is that the extra Windows 2008 standard that you get is not automatically upgradable to R2 under Open Value License/Software Assurance (and this isn’t just because we can’t get into the VLSC web site, it flat out is not a SA/OV upgrade right under that suite platform).


But the virtualization of R2ism is really cool mainly due to the ability to hot add/drop SCSI drives on the fly.  You can’t do that with non R2.


So as it takes a few hours to download this, so watch the blog for a blog series on setting this up and using THIS as your second server virtualization platform.


The tag for this series is HVRemote

4 Thoughts on “Cooking up some R2 virtualization without Windows 2008 R2

  1. I actually just did this, and it works, but in the end the frustrations of the GUI-less Hyper-V server proved to be an undoing for me. I can understand using Hyper-V for a solution where you’re rolling out tens or even hundreds of standardized server images. But the work involved in getting 1 machine to just do what you want it to do is frustrating – little things like there is simply no good solution to the problem of stopping an attached USB drive for removal without a GUI. In the end, I just set the thing up on full 2008 R2 with Hyper-V role. I’m very happy with it – for $1300 (Xeon 3450/Supermicro X8SIL-F/16GB Kingston ECC RAM, etc) I built a machine that has happily virtualized an SBS 2008, Win2K3/BES, and Ubuntu 9.10/ISPConfig3 setup, and leaves me room to fool with about 3 other VMs besides.

    I can’t say enough good things about the X8SIL-F, either – really great board for a small server with IPMI 2.0 for true lights-out management too.

  2. Jeff @ BTS on January 7, 2010 at 5:06 am said:

    The lack of Gui isn’t the end of the world Susan!

    Codeplex is your friend again:

    Powershell frontend:
    http://psconfig.codeplex.com/Release/ProjectReleases.aspx?ReleaseId=31671#DownloadId=79537

  3. Joe Raby on January 7, 2010 at 12:13 pm said:

    Ok, so yes, you can use you Server Standard 2008 (non-R2) from Premium to create a GUI hypervisor setup for SBS.

    BUT….

    Is SBS 2008 *SUPPORTED* as a VM on a Server 2008 R2 box, if you already have separate licensing for R2, or does that matter at all?

    I’m sure there are others that are asking this same question. (I bet there are others asking why you don’t just use your MAPS copy for your own setup)

  4. HVRemote (http://code.msdn.microsoft.com/HVRemote) and CoreConfigurator (http://coreconfig.codeplex.com/) make it onto my Hyper-V Core installs.

    CoreConfigurator 2.0 is sporting a nice GUI now.

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