Small Business Susan

So you have a ton of folks with Outlook 2003 and the are the ones looking to possibly upgrade to SBS 2011?

So you have a ton of folks with Outlook 2003 and the are the ones looking to possibly upgrade to SBS 2011?


If so read this:


Prepare client side environment to Upgrade from Exchange 2003 to Exchange 2010 – Team blog of MCS @ Middle East and Africa – Site Home – TechNet Blogs:
http://blogs.technet.com/b/meamcs/archive/2010/12/19/prepare-client-side-environment-to-upgrade-from-exchange-2003-to-exchange-2010.aspx

As it will impact you.  While Microsoft will want you to upgrade to Office 2007 or 2010, you can still use Outlook 2003 to connect to Exchange 2010.


SBS 2011 ships with Exchange 2010 sp1.  So step one to make it easier to connect those Outlook 2003′s is install update rollup 2 (which includes the rollup 1 stuff)



1 comment so far ↓

  • #   Joe Raby on 12.19.10 at 8:03 pm     

    Just out of curiosity, who buys volume license versions of Windows upgrades and who targets customers with the OEM versions in hardware refresh cycles?

    Likewise, how about Office? Office is still cheaper in OEM versions (unless it’s for a charity), but you CAN add SA to OEM licensing, thereby being able to get probably at least one full software upgrade during the life of the computer.

    If you’re looking at a hardware refresh, why not consider getting that Office 2010 in an OEM version?

    Honestly, SA is still quite a bit of money. If a client was looking at getting SA strictly for the upgrades, but they have a regular hardware refresh cycle, and they don’t need the direct support, I’m not sure I would recommend SA over just refreshing their OEM licenses.

    Sometimes clients look to the solution provider for answers and don’t want direct support from Microsoft, especially in the SMB space. SA is a hard sell to them.

    The one thing I do like is the support for cold backup servers though.