Small Business Susan

Step 29 — moving mailboxes

BEFORE doing this… check your default mailbox sizes


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Okay first I checked the overall limits of the mailbox database.  Just like I did in SBS 2008 era.  http://msmvps.com/blogs/bradley/archive/2009/11/09/migration-step-nineteen-moving-the-mailboxes.aspx


Go to the organization configuration – then to mailbox, then right mouse click on properties.  Then go to the limits tab.



Untick the issue warning/prohibit send and prohibit send and receive before you begin.  Chances are someone in your office has a larger than 2 gig mailbox.



Now we’re ready to go.



On the Destination Server, click Start, click All Programs, click Microsoft Exchange Server 2010, and then click Exchange Management Console.

2.   In the User Account Control dialog box, click Yes.

3.   In the Exchange Management Console navigation pane, expand the Recipient Configuration node, and then click Mailbox.

4.   In the results pane, select all of the legacy mailboxes.






1.   On the Destination Server, click Start, click All Programs, click Microsoft Exchange Server 2010, and then click Exchange Management Console.

2.   In the User Account Control dialog box, click Yes.

3.   In the Exchange Management Console navigation pane, expand the Recipient Configuration node, and then click Mailbox.

4.   In the results pane, select all of the legacy mailboxes.

5.   Click New Local Move Request in the task pane. The New Local Move Request Wizard starts.

6.   Click Browse, select the Destination Server, and then click OK.

7.   Click Next.

Note

We recommend that you click Skip the corrupted messages on the Move Options page of the wizard and that you set the maximum number of messages to skip. If mailboxes are skipped because the maximum number of corrupted messages is exceeded, you must delete those mailboxes before you uninstall Exchange Server 2007 from the Source Server later in the migration process, or you must run the Move Mailbox Wizard again.

Pick a value here.  I’ve seen 100, I’ve seen 9999.  I picked 200 this time around.

8.   Click New on the New Local Move Request page.

9.   Click Finish, and then review any issues that occurred.

And hit the issue where if you specify anything larger than 50, it will indicate you need to use PowerShell.

http://blog.ronnypot.nl/?p=252

For purposes of this blog I’ll pick 49.

And 49 works.

That’s it?  That was fast

10.  In the details pane of the Exchange Management Console, verify that no legacy mailboxes are listed, and then close the Console.

But wait, why do I still see legacy mailboxes?

11.  In the Exchange Management Console navigation pane, click the Recipient Configuration node, click Move Request. Clear all move requests after they are marked as complete.

Hang on click on move requests and you can see the queued mailboxes.


Note


If you are using ActiveSync®, but you cannot sync emails for some of the accounts, those accounts may be members of a protected group, such as Domain Administrators. For detailed information on how to fix this issue, see Exchange ActiveSync Returned an HTTP 500 Error (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=208651).


Okay I’m heading to bed and letting this run.



1 comment so far ↓

  • #   Ronny on 01.23.11 at 1:47 pm     

    Thanks for the link!

    My experience is that I have never seen a mailbox move with more than 49 corrupted items. In most cases at most 1 or 2 items were corrupted.