So how many SBS 2011 Essentials are you selling?

https://training.partner.microsoft.com/learning/contentserver/msrecordings/jkncdvn48fwktnm6/jkncdvn48fwktnm6.wmv


So how many SBS 2011 Essentials are you selling?


How many SBS 2011 Standard are you selling?


Recording of the most recent SBSC Live meeing. 

5 Thoughts on “So how many SBS 2011 Essentials are you selling?

  1. SBS Essentials – 0
    SSB Standard – about one every four months

  2. Joe Raby on March 16, 2012 at 7:41 pm said:

    I can’t say that SBS *anything* is an easy sell these days. Sold a number of SBS Essentials SKU’s in the last few months though, but then I also build custom boxes too, so creating a hardware+software solution that is custom-made (not just an off-the-shelf OEM box) is more attractive to customers.

    Generally speaking, my customers like the benefits of on-premise AD, and many have LOB database apps and/or files that either can’t be cloud-hosted due to regulatory issues, or just are far too large to work with over any speed of connection, like 2 clients that have TERRAbytes of AutoCAD files. Most don’t have email regulatory issues (ones that do use SBS Standard or some form of digital certification system like PGP or whatever).

    I think when Microsoft rethinks SBS Essentials in the future, what they should do is just integrate the features into Server 8 in a low-cost SKU. I’ve used the new management console, and it’s AWESOME! They give you more control over the functionality in SBSe’s consoles, and yet you’re not relegated to using MMC. I LOVE the “Features On Demand” installation option too. Just give us low-cost Server 8, with Add-ons, and the default roles installed and I’d be extremely happy.

  3. I’m moving lots of SBSe servers. They’re perfect for smaller hardware, like a Lenovo ts130 or HP microserver. Total package around $4k. Around 1 per month. These work nicely for active directory and Quickbooks.

    I know all the cool kids are moving to mint, freshbooks, and other cloud “accounting” packages but ALL of my clients now use QB or Peachtree. I don’t recommend QBOnline because it’s limited and there’s no realistic way to export your data if the cloud dies. And Intuit’s cloud has been crappier than most.

    I’m still moving SBS 2011, mainly for mid-sized offices where people actually work in the office.

    Sad to say, it’s 2012 and there are still places in my service area where broadband faster than 2M is just. not. available.

    No internets, no cloud.

    -Greg C
    Charland Tech

  4. Jules Wilkinson on March 24, 2012 at 10:50 am said:

    Two SBS Essentials…
    Two SBS 2011…

    In the last year :-S

    Spending most of my time keeping SBS 2003 up and running.

    Heck, I didn’t do many SBS 2008’s either as 2003 was that good.

    I *will* be doing more full fat SBS 2011’s as people can do the math vs. how long their previous server lasted, and I shouldn’t have any less faith in the lifetime of SBS 2011 (should I?)… Even if the horsepower requirements have gone *way* up…

  5. Jules Wilkinson on March 24, 2012 at 3:27 pm said:

    Great webinar – not seen this before…
    LOL @ Upsell – SBS 2011 to Windows Foundation Server?? Eh?
    I wonder why Server 2008 Standard doesn’t have O365 UX integration? I wonder if it’s in the works?
    Oh no… I remember… Microsoft doesn’t migrate any more.

Post Navigation