Listening to the TWIT podcast

http://live.twit.tv/


Listening to the podcast where I hear Paul Thurrott say that there are a small group of partners (apparently we are insignificant) who are freaking out because they rely on SBS to make money and if you move to the cloud it removes their ability to make money.


Paul, it’s not all about that… it’s about lousy Internet connectivity that means that one needs to stay more on premises, it’s about better uptime and reliability on an on premises box – as compare the uptime of Office 365 to my server and my server wins hands down.  It’s also about what the client wants and needs for compliance and regulatory issues.  It’s about getting the ability to be able to easily edit and adjust and customize Exchange to how you need it and Office 365 doesn’t give enough adjustability.  One size does not fit most and not all small businesses want the cloud as the location for their Exchange.


Windows Server 2012 Licensing In Detail:
http://www.aidanfinn.com/?p=13042


Interesting post there… Windows server 2012 is allowed to do 2 virtualization instances on the host (if I’m reading that right).

One Thought on “Listening to the TWIT podcast

  1. Colin on July 6, 2012 at 3:48 pm said:

    Yes, in the US we simply don’t understand the limited availability of internet access around the world, low bandwidth caps, etc. Having recently been in South Africa which is considered 1st world with respect to internet access, it’s still very expensive and most people only have 1 Gb per month available. An offsite solution just simply is not effective nor affordable, let along what alternatives from Microsoft to Small Business Server cost!!

    I have just worked out that what would have cost my client around $1,500 for Small Business Server 2011 Standard with an entry level server, will now cost them around $3,825 with less functionality. This means two servers as Microsoft does not support Exchange on the DC, so two licenses of Windows Server 2012 Standard with Exchange Server 2010 (or later).

    Simply put, this means that I will not be installing servers in the SMB market like I have been and being forced to look outside of the Microsoft products to provide a similar service or solution to Small Business Server. That might mean that I have less work but it’s certianly going to be mean less Microsoft products being used and resold!!

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