How to trouble-shoot Publisher web upload issues

applies to versions 2003, 2002, 2000


Firstly a word of advice.. if you must contact you web host support avoid telling them you have a Publisher web. Most of them will freak out if they hear that and cause you more grief in the end. This reaction is based on ignorance. For the most part issues are fundamental and it is irrelevant as to what generated html files. If you are having FrontPage Extension issues just let the host assume you are using a FrontPage web, most hosts don’t know that Publisher is using FP components.


If you are having an issue with Publisher publishing the web publication to the web server there are some basic trouble-shooting steps to work through. Such an issue is usually a connectivity and/or host side issue versus a Publisher issue. Use these steps to help determine the problem and/or isolate it.


Note: if you have a form page in your web publication – which requires FrontPage Server Extensions (FPSE), or you are wanting to use http uploading (requires FPSE) – then disregard any ftp procedures. Forms do not work if using ftp publishing, ftp publishing will break FPSE. You should only use one protocol all the time and not both

– check firewall settings, application/user privileges.


– if behind a network, verify with network admin that you have ftp privileges.

– reboot your machine (you may have a hung connection).

– verify you have the correct FTP url from the host.

– if using http verify the url with the host.

– verify with host the user login.

– verify your publishing steps (see how to publish articles)


– see if you can connect to the server using a different ftp client (i.e. wsftp le).

– if it’s ftp that is failing, then if possible try publishing in http.

– delete the ftp location and create a new one.

– if http then delete the network place and create a new one.

– log in host control panel and verify file and directory permissions are read/write.

– is the issue before or after the login is prompted and/or accepted. When after a successful login the likelihood increases that the issue is on the host side and not on your end. Contact host support.

– verify that you have no page in the web publication that has “hanging” objects, an object that straddles the document area and the scratch area. This can confuse and lock up publishing. The Design Checker should be used to identify issues prior to publishing.

– verify with the host that the server has the correct permission settings to allow Publisher to create and modify directories and XML files.

– verify that you have the disk space on your host account, that you aren’t surpassing your alloted web space (this is very commonplace!)

– if your login was accepted then verify that you are in the correct directory on the web server when trying to publish.



 

How to publish a Publisher web in HTTP


applies to versions 2003, 2002, 2000 (Note: 2002 users must explicitly type in the file name – index.htm) (Note: 2000 users disregard some options and settings)


If your domain hosting account has FrontPage Server Extensions (FPSE) installed you can upload your web site files in the HTTP Protocol. When FPSE is loaded on your account it is recommended that you use HTTP uploads exclusively because using FTP at any time may corrupt the FPSE files.


You must understand that the server processing functionality provided by FPSE requires HTTP publishing to deliver that functionality.


For example if you have a web page form in your Publisher web publication that form will only be functional on the server if it’s published in HTTP. Publisher uses FPSE to deliver the processing functionality to Publisher web forms. So if you designed a web form in your web publication you then need to have FPSE installed (that’s a host support function) and you have to publish the web publication in the HTTP protocol.


This article assumes the following:


  • you have a completed Publisher web publication
  • you have an available web hosting account
  • you have the http protocol url from your web space provider (not always the same as the ftp)
  • you have a web hosting account login from the provider


With that information at hand and your web publication file open and saved and your internet connection on we’ll start with a few recommended web settings.


We start with a visit in the Options. Go to the Tools menu, click on Options to open the Options dialog, go to the Web tab.


On the web tab uncheck the “Rely on VML…” option, and uncheck the “Allow PNG…” option. Checkboxes under Encoding and under E-mail should also be unchecked.


The top two options I suggest having checked, but aren’t required.


The Organize… option means that Publisher will create a sub-folder for your site and all site files except for the home page will be in this folder. If you prefer a folder structure and may be wanting to expand the site and build upon this then you’d want the option on. If you prefer to keep it simple and keep all site files together then you’d want the option off.


The Enable… option means that Publisher will create on the server a special XML file that is used to keep track of your pages. At a later time when you make a modification to the web publication and need to publish it again, Publisher will use this file to know what pages in the publication are effected by the modification and only upload those files rather then the entire publication.


If you have a small site or if you plan to make changes that are across the publication the use of this option would be unnecessary. If you have a large site that can take considerable time to upload or if you plan to make very limited changes then the use of this option can be a time saver.


Click the OK button to save the settings and close the Options dialog.


Now go the File menu and click on “Publish to the Web…” You may receive a dialog box informing you that you need a Web host. As stated earlier this article assumes you have such already. Click OK to close the dialog. Optionally check the Don’t show option to avoid the dialog in the future. Next the Publish to the Web dialog appears.


In the Publish to the web dialog box click the My Network Places icon in the menu.


That will list your current Network Places, you’ll now create a new Network Place to your domain hosting account. In the “File Name” box type in the HTTP protocol URL for your hosting account (this is not always the domain name so check with your host first) including the “http://” – for example: http://www.yourdomainname.com – and then click the Save button.


Publisher then locates the web server and you will then receive the login dialog box prompting you for your hosting account username and password. Input the login information and when it accepts your login the Publish To The Web dialog box then updates showing it is connected to your web server space.


The domain name will be shown in the “Save In” box at the top of the dialog and your server folders and files will be displayed. Do not change, move, or delete any file or folder on the server that you (or Publisher) did not create. Such files and folders are created by the provider and may be critical to the function of the web space they are providing you.


Some providers may state that you have to upload to a specific folder, if that is the case with your providers directions and you see that folder in the file list then click that folder to move into it.


The file name box will already have the sites home page file name of index.htm filled in so now all you have to do is click the Save button.


Once the Save button is clicked Publisher generates the html web page files and the image files and writes all the site files to the server. The time this process takes varies by several factors. Such as publication size, image sizes and number of, and your ISP connection speed, and the web server itself.


Once the process has completed close dialogs and close Publisher and then open your browser to your web address and test the site. If you have a form be sure to test it. Web forms cannot be tested in Publisher’s Web Page Preview. You can only test them from the server. This is because they are a server side function.


That’s all there is to publishing your Publisher web publication in HTTP.


If you are using a Publisher form here’s an FYI, the confirmation page displayed on the submit of the form is dynamically generated by the FPSE. There is no option available to customize that confirmation page or to use your own confirmation page.


I’ll close this article with a helpful tip. If you experience issues with using HTTP uploading or you experience issues with your published web form, you’ll want to verify your host has installed FPSE. That is very easy to do, simply browse to a hidden web page called “_vti_inf.html” on your domain. For example – http://www.yourdomainname.com/_vti_inf.html


If they are indeed installed you’ll be reading a FrontPage Configuration web page, if you don’t get the page then talk to your host. If you do get the page and you are having HTTP issues that may indicate FPSE corruption, so talk to your host.

How to publish a Publisher web publication (FTP)


applies to versions 2003, 2002, 2000 (Note: 2002 users must explicitly type in the file name – index.htm) (Note: 2000 users disregard some options and settings)


You’ve finally finished it. Your web publication is complete, at least for now. You’re ready to share it with the world. But how exactly do you get your pride and joy onto the World Wide Web?


It’s actually quite simple, once you know the steps. Which is what I’m going to teach you in this article.


First this article assumes a few things-


  • you have a completed Publisher web publication  (if you created a print publication you must convert it)
  • you have an available web space (a host provider or ISP)
  • you an upload url from your web space provider (for ftp publishing)
  • you have a web space login from the provider (your account username and password)


Have these items ready, have your web publication open and saved, and we’re ready to begin the steps to move your creation from your desktop to desktops around the planet.


We start with a visit in the Options. Go to the Tools menu, click on Options to open the Options dialog, go to the Web tab.


On the web tab uncheck the Rely on VML… option, and uncheck the Allow PNG… option. Checkboxes under Encoding and under E-mail should also be unchecked.


The top two options I suggest having checked, but aren’t required.


The Organize… option means that Publisher will create a sub-folder for your site and all site files except for the home page will be in this folder. If you prefer a folder structure and may be wanting to expand the site and build upon this then you’d want the option on. If you prefer to keep it simple and keep all site files together then you’d want the option off.


The Enable… option means that Publisher will create on the server a special XML file that is used to keep track of your pages. At a later time when you make a modification to the web publication and need to publish it again, Publisher will use this file to know what pages in the publication are effected by the modification and only upload those files rather then the entire publication.


If you have a small site or if you plan to make changes that are across the publication the use of this option would be unnecessary. If you have a large site that can take considerable time to upload or if you plan to make very limited changes then the use of this option can be a time saver.


Click the OK button to save the settings and close the Options dialog.


Now go the File menu and click on Publish to the Web… You may receive a dialog box informing you that you need a Web host. As stated earlier this article assumes you have such already. Click OK to close the dialog. Optionally check the Don’t show option to avoid the dialog in the future. Next the Publish to the Web dialog appears.


Click the drop down list arrow in the Save in: box. At the very bottom of this list, scroll if necessary, you’ll see two lines – FTP locations and Add/Modify FTP locations. Since this is your first upload you’ll need to first Add your upload URL so click on Add/Modify FTP locations. (Next time you publish you’ll skip the following steps)


You now have the dialog box to Add your web space publishing information. Please recall you were to have this information ready.


In the Name of FTP site type in the full URL for uploading that was provided to you by your web space provider. This is not case-sensitive. Next, in the Log on as: area check the User button and in the adjacent box type in the Username your provider gave you. Then in the Password box type in the Password the provider gave you. These two are case-sensitive so be sure to enter your login exactly as the provider provided it.


Double-check your entries and then click the Add button. If the Add button is grayed out then the URL is not a valid address type or login information was not entered. Check with your provider if you need assistance. Clicking the Add button enters your site into the FTP sites: list box. Click OK to close the dialog.


You then return to the Publish dialog and you’ll see your upload address displayed. (Next time you upload you’ll skip the above Add steps and come to this point) Click on your URL and then click the Open button. (The file name should say index.htm and the Save as type: should be Web Page, Filtered- these are default settings)


You may receive a log on dialog. Verify the Username is correct and type in the Password and click the OK button.


Publisher now makes a connection to the web server. Once the connection is made the file list will change and now display the files/folders on the server. Do not change, move, or delete any file or folder on the server that you (or Publisher) did not create. Such files and folders are created by the provider and may be critical to the function of the web space they are providing you.


Some providers may state that you have to upload to a specific folder, if that is the case with your providers directions and you see that folder in the file list then click that folder to move into it and then click the Save button. Otherwise just click the Save button.


Once the Save button is clicked Publisher generates the html web page files and the image files and writes all the site files to the server. The time this process takes varies by several factors. Such as publication size, image sizes and number of, and your ISP connection speed, and the web server.


Once the process has completed close dialogs and close Publisher and then open your browser to your web address and spend some time testing out the site before sharing the address with others.


Keep in mind that the world doesn’t know about your site just because you published it. So take your time – test it out, and make sure it’s user friendly, and above all else that it accomplishes what you intended.

Publisher 2003 – What’s new in web design for this version

applies to version 2003


Personally my favorite thing about this version is that the products Personal Info Dialog Box finally has an option to turn it off. Through each version I have never used the Personal Info feature and that pop up dialog on each new publication has always annoyed me. The dialog now has a check box so if you aren’t planning to use the Personal Info feature and you check that box you can launch your future new publications a little faster and with a few less mouse clicks.

I do have another favorite thing about this version and like that dialog this has been a Pet Peeve of mine through previous versions. A feature that’s been long over due and in fact has been present in Word for at least the prior two versions. That new feature being Pixels as a measurement unit option. Pixel measurement provides the accuracy to achieve a more professional look and feel in your layout and designs.

Of more significant importance this version corrects issues that were introduced with the 2002 version, such as variable page lengths, hyperlinks in filled text boxes, and custom page naming.

Version 2003 introduces new templates that make it very easy to create a professional looking web site and new wizards and visual cues that make web publications simpler and easier to understand.

This version introduces what MS has coined “Incremental Uploading”. What that means in English is that the whole site no longer has to be uploaded after modifying the web publication file. This feature when turned on keeps track of which pages are modified in the publication file and only uploads those files.

Publisher achieves this through the use of XML. Which is one of the factors behind the larger web file size in this version compared to previous versions.

The more code in a file the larger the file size. Here is a comparison:

Under v.2002 SP2, select Accent web template, Export as web page, result is :
index.htm (11 kb)
7 image files created equaling 26 kb total
total load size for home page is 37 kb (11 + 26)

Under v.2003, select Accent template, Publish to web, result is :
index.htm (41 kb)
12 image files created equaling a total of 40kb (extra files due to VML in 2003)
total load size for home page is 81 kb (41 + 40)

In testing Incremental Uploading I have been pleased with the results. It will definitely be a time saver for larger sites. Technically you don’t get the full benefits of it until after the third time the site is published.

An issue that was found during testing of this feature is that on some web servers the sites supporting folder (containing all pages after the home page) is hidden, not visible when logged on to the server and viewing the contents. MS identified this as being an issue with the web servers handling of xml files. The user can contact their web host about this permissions issue or they can elect to not use the supporting folder option.

I’ve already pointed out the subject of file size. File size is the only down side I see with this version. In addition to what I’ve already mentioned some other nice things are – a return to naming the home page to index.htm by default, more nav bar placement options, separation of nav bar titles and page titles, and lots of pre-made topic pages.

I’ve published a sample site at this address— http://www.davidbartosik.org/2003samples/network_easy_web/

This sample site generated 114 files with a total file size of 2.2 MB. The index file (home page) is 112 kb. The site is comprised of only 12 pages. You can CLICK HERE to view the file listing for the site. This listing also illustrates the new default file naming convention of this version (yes they changed it again).

Those users with free web space and/or limited web space will most likely find that 2 MB for a 12 page site is an obstacle. Business users implementing a site on a local intranet can be less concerned.

Whether you have an existing web site from Publisher or are considering creation of a web site with Publisher, you the user will need to determine for yourself whether the enhancements of this latest version out weigh the down side of the web page file size.

How to Thumbnail in Publisher Web Publications

applies to version 2003 and 2002 – version 2002 users disregard the sections on Picture Optimization


Thumbnailing is very common in web design and is a very simple design technique easily implemented. Simple though it is, it is one of the most frequently asked Help requests in the Microsoft Community for Microsoft Publisher. In response to that this article will illustrate the concept of thumbnailing, as well as take this opportunity to demonstrate the Picture Optimizer tool introduced in Publisher 2003 Service Pack 1.


What is Thumbnailing?


Well what it is not is something magical or difficult. It is a concept of hyperlinking a small version of an image to a larger version of an image. The technique became popular in the early days of the web mainly due to download speeds available at the time. It could take a long time to download a full size jpeg image file on a page. So rather then display the full image on a web page it became a popular concept to display a smaller copy on the page and then hyperlink that to the full size image. Thereby providing the image to the site visitor faster, albeit smaller, while offering them the flexibility to choose the option of viewing the full size original image file. Typically this is implemented in a “gallery” fashion, where several images are to be on display.


Before you implement thumbnailing you might consider your target audience, with the growth of broadband and higher download speeds today, larger graphics of higher quality can be used with little difference in download time. Keep in mind thumbnailing by its very nature is adding additional mouse clicks to the site visitor. If over-used it may make the use of the site to time-consuming. Instead of a gallery of thumbnails you can consider running the gallery as a series of pages with one or two images per page.


What is the Picture Optimizer Tool for Publisher 2003?


Well, first some background. Publisher 2003 is designed to provide a richer graphic experience in web publications (keep in mind todays higher download speeds). In part by using newer image formats such as PNG, and technology like VML. Both exploit the power of Internet Explorer 6 (and newer). Then also in part, by retaining the quality of the image the customer inserts into the web publication, during the generation of the web site files.


Image quality, image resolution, and terms such as “DPI”, are outside the scope of this article so you are encouraged to research that topic independently. However it is helpful to know that Publisher versions prior to version 2003 would “down-grade” the customers image to a suitable web resolution when making a copy of the image in the web site generation. The smaller resolution translates into a smaller file size which translates into a faster download time. The more images that are on a web page, the more download time increases. The more resolution of such images decreases as well as overall image size, the more download time decreases.


It is the burden of the web designer to balance image resolution, image size, and number of images, in an effort to provide the best experience for the site visitor.


That said, Publisher 2003 does not “down-grade” the customers image. If the customer inserts a 400 dpi image then the web site copy of that image that Publisher generates in the web site files will retain that quality. Actually Publisher 2003 makes multiple copies of the image in various formats and qualities designed to target various browsers, this article doesn’t have time to wander off on that topic. But that covers the background details.


In response to strong feedback from Microsoft’s Publisher MVP’s and customer experiences, Service Pack 1 introduced a Picture Optimizer tool on the Publisher 2003 Picture toolbar. This tool provides the customer the option of “down-grading” their inserted image. This is done prior to the web site generation. On a side note, in my opinion a customer should use a graphics tool to reduce the resolution of their image and to resize it in the dimensions wanted for the web page, – before – they insert that image in the Publisher web publication. In lieu of that the Picture Optimizer tool is a must.


If you have not yet downloaded Service Pack 1 and updated your Publisher 2003, please do so. The Service Pack link is available at http://office.microsoft.com.


Next launch Publisher 2003, open a web publication, have your image(s) close by, and we’ll proceed with thumbnailing.


Thumbnailing


Using Insert, Picture, From File…, browse to the image file you want to place on the web publication page. The image is placed on the page and the Picture Toolbar appears. On the toolbar click the Compress Pictures tool button (requires SP1). The compression dialog will pop-up on the page, which is self-explanatory. For this example I will click on “Selected pictures”, “Web/Screen”, and leave the Options as checked. Then click OK to accept, apply, and close the dialog. I then close the Picture Toolbar. Then select the image and grab one of the points on the outline and resize the image to the desired size and spot it on the page layout as desired. This is the “thumbnail”. You can resize this to any size you desire and whatever looks best in your page layout, but if you want some guideline, then I’ll mention that the common design practice is to size thumbnails at 100 pixels by 100 pixels. You can use the pixel rulers on the publication to size accordingly.


To make the thumbnail functional we need something to hyperlink it to. This means that our full size image file needs to be on the web server. Uploading a file to your web server and upload protocols are outside the scope of this article. Connect to your web server using your preferred method, be it the host file manager, an ftp client, or http web folders in Windows XP, and upload the image file to your web space.


As a side note, before you upload the file you should use a proper file naming convention, refer to my web site advice article for details. Additionally for organization I recommend you first create a directory on your web server called “images”. That folder will be the location you upload your full size image to. Meaning your uploaded image file would have an address path on your server that looks like this – www.yourdomainame.com/images/yourpic.jpg


That address is the files URL. You need to know your files URL in order to hyperlink the thumbnail to your file. So make sure you know it, write it down if need be or copy it to your Windows clipboard. In fact take a moment to verify you have the URL correct, open a browser window, paste the URL or type it in the address bar, and press Enter. If the image file loads in your browser window then you have the URL correct. If you load a 404 error, page not found, in the browser window then you have the URL incorrect (back up and review your work).


That image in the browser window is just what you will see when we finish the thumbnailing steps. Select and copy that URL in the address bar and go back to your Publisher web publication. Do a right click on the image (thumbnail) and select hyperlink. The hyperlink dialog then appears. On the Link To menu select the “Existing file or web page” option. In the address box paste your URL. Click OK.


Hover your mouse cursor over the image for a moment and a tool tip will appear that will display the URL the image is linked to. If it looks correct then press the ctrl key and click and verify that the link opens your browser to your file.


That’s it. There is nothing mysterious about thumbnailing. Afterwards you publish your Publisher web publication. For proper Publisher web publication publishing (uploading), refer to my publishing articles.


For future help in your web design efforts with Publisher visit our forum at Publisher Community.

Web safe fonts in Publisher 2003 web publications

When you open a web publication in Publisher version 2003 you will not find all the fonts installed on your system. Where did all the fonts go?

One of the most important things to remember when designing a web page is that you should only use the standardized “web safe” fonts. If you use a font other than one of the 8 web safe fonts, then your site visitor may view your content in a font their browser substitutes. That result can be unpredictable. To avoid that design ‘mistake’ the web publication only allows the appropriate fonts.


The 8 web safe fonts are: Arial, Comic Sans, Courier, Georgia, Impact, Times New Roman, Trebuchet, Verdana.


Publisher 2003 has not removed your other fonts, it is simply hiding them in a web publication in order to help you design as a Web Professional would.


This hiding of the fonts is optional, it is simply turned on by default.


If you opt to ignore this web safe design you can disengage the safe font setting. While in a web publication go to Format menu, Font, and deselect the “show only web font” option.


Afterwards all fonts on the system will be available to your web publication.

Real World examples – sites by Publisher customers

 I am frequently asked for an example of a web site created in Publisher. In response to that I have compiled the following list of sites that I have come across in assisting customers.

These sites were Publisher built to the last of my knowledge. You may need to review the site source (View menu, Source) to verify the site is still Publisher (details follow). Customers may also move to other versions of Publisher so I do not reference the version in use with a site at the time I reviewed the site.


Publisher 2000 writes a generator tag in the source identifying it as “Publisher 2000”. Publisher 2002 and 2003 make identification a little more difficult. If the 2002/2003 site is produced in Publisher “Rich” html (heavy page) it will indicate “Publisher 10” (2002) or “Publisher 11” (2003). If produced in Publisher’s “Filtered” html (lightest page), and you see lots of VML/XML code and “filelist.xml” in the first few lines of the source it’s 2003. Otherwise, if it starts with meta tags, and goes into the style (CSS) list and/or has “filelist.xml” than the source is likely 2002 SP1 (or SP2/SP3).


http://www.homewineevent.com   http://www.karmadesigngroup.com  http://www.karmamusic.com
http://www.dogwoodindustries.com   http://www.tjbontenbal721.freeler.nl    http://mignonskincare.co.uk
http://www.dresdenframing.com   http://www.lloydminsterbandits.com   http://www.eventservices.ca
http://hilltop.bradley.edu   http://www.advancedaudioinc.com   http://www.russellgraves.com
http://www.solsess.com   http://www.ecuatrade-us.com    http://www.bsccweb.com
http://www3.sympatico.ca    http://www.armstrong-dental.com    http://www.jugendlieberotts.com
http://www.shannondavies.ca   http://www.journeywithin.info   http://homepage.eircom.net
http://www.keithmcdonaldplumbing.com   http://www.lcsmc.com   http://www.geocities.com/gordonsdog
http://www.axiomre.com   http://www.austincockerrescue.org   http://www.frescaaire.com
http://www.myfamilymatters.ca   http://www.riverranchmontana.com   http://www.speakingforbusiness.com
http://www.nicevilleanimalclinic.com  http://www.frankandjudi.com  http://www.dorothydunnettreadingaids.com
http://www.monroegovernment.org  http://www.tikana.co.nz   http://www.timesaversforteachers.com
http://www.myrichelder.com   http://www.nambetechnologies.com   http://www.holtswcd.org
http://www.nierikasol.net   http://www.aptyping.f9.co.uk    http://www.lgi-furniture.com
http://www.wakeupcompany.com    http://www.bnaiisraeltomsriver.org    http://www.biggarage.com
http://members.shaw.ca/tamgarboxers   http://stjohns.intheway.org   http://www.tyconmedical.com
http://www.toolsforgirlz.com   http://www.kingdomfirstacademy.com    http://www.willow-way.com
http://www.xeroid.150m.com   http://www.myrottweilerpups.com    http://www.storehouseonline.com
http://www.benllechholidays.freeserve.co.uk   http://www.awmlaw.com   http://www.griffsservices.com
http://www.itf.ca  http://www.rejoicingspirits.org   http://www.judyminor.ca
http://www.rheemsfire.com  http://www.users.bigpond.com    http://www.hagerforhousega.com
http://www.knittercritter.com    http://www.forefrontstudios.com   http://www.laura.stadler.com
http://www.legal-eaze.com   http://www.book-it.biz   http://www.careerabc.com
http://members.shaw.ca/dalefleury   http://home.online.no/~grokh   http://myweb.tiscali.co.uk/g4ucj
http://www.discovery-europe.biz   http://www.world-wide-virtual.us   http://www.logwell.com
http://bst.atozclassifieds.com    http://www.campos-emert.com    http://www.oldtimer-retiree.org
http://www.janislovesrichard.com    http://www.betsyhendricksmd.com   http://www.mrhd.org
http://www.tacstrategy.com   http://www.centerforlit.com   http://www.professionalcounselling.co.uk
http://www.fengshuisystems.com   http://www.parisconnection.fr    http://www.chinchilla-supplies.co.uk
http://www.mystickerclub.com   http://www.vanusa.org    http://www.mercmedicalsupply.com
http://www.minneapolishomeinspections.com http://www.urglobal.org/  

Web Publication Changes Made in Version 2002 of Publisher

NOTE: Go to Help, About… in your Publisher 2002 and check the version number. If it does not indicate Service Pack 1 (SP 1) or greater then visit http://office.microsoft.com at once and visit the Office Updates to update your Publisher to the most current level. Service Pack 1 contains a vital fix to the HTML coding engine. Do not use Publisher 2002 for a web publication unless it is at version update level SP 1 or higher.


Web page building in Publisher 2002 is very different functionally from that of Publisher 2000. If you come from Publisher 2000 you’ll think you know how the program (2002) works but you won’t. You’ll then likely feel frustrated and feel that Publisher 2002 was made to be harder to use. What happened was that Publisher for the new XP suite was made to look and feel, and function, like the other Office XP Suite products. Shared components, VBA support, same functionality, etc. So the intent was to make everything work the same, it wasn’t to make Publisher hard to use. With this change came an entirely new HTML coding engine. Meaning the HTML code that is generated by version 2002 (and subsequent releases) is entirely different from the HTML code that gets generated by version 2000 (and prior).


Once you start designing your 2002 web page document you’ll notice some interface changes; buttons, outlines, etc., the sorts of things you’d expect with a version change. This article focuses on functional changes. One of the first changes you will discover in 2002 is that the Web Properties dialog is gone. A similar dialog is now located under the Tools menu, Options, Web Option button. Same place you’ll find it in Microsoft Word 2002. One change that is very important to be aware of and effects more than just web page building, is that the WordArt is now the Office Suite’s version of WordArt and as such compatibility issues arise with WordArt created in Publisher 2000 WordArt. Once you’ve created your web pages and are ready to save them and have Publisher write the html files you’ll be faced with some of the most significant changes from that of version 2000.


One of these is the naming convention, 2002 does it differently than 2000. 2000 defaulted the home page file to index.html (as needed by your web host) and numbered pages after that, but did allow you to rename the page file names thru the web properties menu if you so desired. 2002 does not default to index.html, the file name will just default to something in the save as box, it is up to you to change it to index.html (or index.htm). Also 2002 has no custom file naming feature as 2000 did. You are stuck with the html file names that Publisher 2002 creates. On a side note, 2000 defaulted to the .html file extension, 2002 defaults to the .htm extension. Either extension is accepted by the web host and they work the same. You can use whichever you prefer, just be sure to be consistent with one of them. (FYI, naming convention changes again in version 2003) (FYI, custom file naming returns in version 2003)


The additional site pages are numbered, slightly similar to 2000’s technique, but 2002 does not have the option to change those file names as 2000 did. In 2000 that was an available option in Web Properties. The next big change is that 2002 defaults to putting your site’s supporting files into a sub-folder which will carry the same name as what you just saved too, so if you saved to “index.htm” the folder would be named “index_files”. Whereas 2000 placed all site files together into one folder, typically the “Publish” folder unless you had modified that. (FYI, version 2003 returns to defaulting to index.htm) (Note: see my article on including external files in a Publisher 2002 (and greater) web)


That folder and it’s contents that 2002 creates needs to be uploaded to the web server along with the home page file that is outside of that folder for the site to work, because the links have all been written by 2002 to include that sub-folder in it’s path. If you prefer to have all files together with no folder (like 2000 did) you can toggle that on and off. Go to Tools menu, Options, Web Options button, Files tab, and uncheck the top most box and click ok, ok. To keep your site simple I recommend you do not use the sub-folder.


To save the web publication as a web site (generate the html files) you go to File, Export as. This is another change from prior versions as the menu option stated “Save as web” previously. Before the generation of the html files, Publisher will prompt a small dialog indicating that it is using Filtered HTML for the output. This is by design and is part of the new HTML coding engine previously mentioned. If you do not see this prompt then review my “Note” at the top of this article. OK the prompt and continue.


One annoying thing with a 2002 web publication is that the web page doesn’t end with the last object on the page as it does in 2000’s HTML. Instead it will carry the background for the full length of the page length specified in Page Setup. This is because version 2002 codes a height tag explicitly to the publications page length. Version 2000 did not code a height tag. (FYI, version 2003 returns variable page length specific to page content)


As a Publisher 2000 user you may have seen your pub file being rather large in file size. The good news is that 2002 has compression. You’ll typically see a reduction in file size of up to 80% between the two versions. This is only in reference to the .pub file. The .pub file has no relation to the html files generated for a web site from a web publication .pub file.


The HTML generated by the new html coding engine is significantly more abundant then it’s younger sibling. It also has a lower probability of achieving cross browser support. The new HTML is designed to exploit the technologies of the Internet Explorer web browser. This new, more abundant code, results in a larger file size. Meaning the full size of a web site created by 2002 will be greatly larger then a web site created by 2000. You will need to confirm that your web host provides adequate space for the web site. Keep in mind that the larger file size means the pages take longer to load and view in the browser. This amount of time and it’s degree of visible delay will obviously depend on the quality and the speed of the internet service in use with the browser.


(FYI, there are no plans to modify or replace the HTML coding engine nor to reduce html file sizes, for the foreseeable future)


 

Copy Protection for images in a Publisher web site


If your web site is for the purpose of selling artwork or imagary you may be concerned about the “save picture as” in the right-click menu of the IE browser. You might prefer to have some way to “copy protect” images on the website.

First I need to make some common sense points…

– A web browser downloads all web content to the client PC to be able to display it. Any one can go to the Interent temp files folder on their pc and grab image files or any file that is from the site. Basically anything on a web page is available to be taken. That is the nature of the web.

– The technique professionals in the image trade use is that of watermarking images and of only displaying low quality versions. Visit a professional image online seller and you can see these techniques. That is the proper way to implement a “copy protection scheme” to online image content, short of not displaying it at all.

– The no right click menu “trick” you may encounter on some sites is only a little JavaScript “trick”. Any idiot
that likes to copy images knows to go into the browser settings and turn off JavaScript support. That’s all it takes to circumvent that “copy protection”. That then enables them to right click until their fingers go numb.

– The fast way to grab an image off a web page is to just go to View, Source and look at the page source
for the image file name and then go to that URL and viola you have the image. For example the site – www.realsimple.com – the image is at http://i.timeinc.net/realsimple/i/dsgn/logo.gif . No JavaScript routine is stopping that.


You can’t stop the site visitor from doing something, you can only implement a level of security that minimizes your concerns. In the case of protecting image content, the solution is, as mentioned earlier, watermarking.


But, (there is always a but 😉 it just so happens that the “save as picture” being discussed in this article is not available on Publisher 2003 made web pages. For example look at the sample site at http://www.davidbartosik.com/2003samples/network_easy_web/  – try the right click on an image.


Publisher 2003 implements VML technology, which if viewed in a VML browser (IE 6+) you will find that there is no “save picture as” option in the right click menu. If elimination of the right click menu option is the only level of security you desire then this meets your needs. However the image is still available, you only have to view the source code to find the image path – http://www.davidbartosik.com/2003samples/network_easy_web//index_image378.gif  – load this URL in the browser and you have the image. You can then “save picture as” or File, Save as.

Again the answer to actually “copy protect” images is to watermark a lower quality resolution copy of the image.


Publisher is not an image editor so plan on using your own photo editor tool to do watermarking.