Deborah's Developer MindScape






         Tips and Techniques for Web and .NET developers.

Archive for AngularJS

May 15, 2015

Clearing the Internet Explorer Browser Cache

Filed under: AngularJS @ 10:49 am

When working on an Angular application, it is important to ensure that the browser does not keep prior versions of your JavaScript or other files cached. Otherwise, when you make a change to a JavaScript or HTML file and re-run the application, you may not see your changes.

Here are the steps to ensure that Internet Explorer does not cache your files:

1) Select the Tools icon and select Internet options:

image

2) Click the Settings button (on the General tab)

image

3) Select the desired option. I often pick “Every time I start Internet Explorer”

image

Enjoy!

April 30, 2015

What Developers are Saying About: "Angular Front to Back With Web API"

It is sometimes difficult to find detailed step-by-step guidance for building an application using Angular and ASP.NET Web API. The Pluralsight course: “Angular Front to Back With Web API” covers the following topics from front to back:

  • Retrieving Data
  • CORS and Formatters
  • Passing Parameters
  • Using OData Queries
  • Saving Data
  • Action Results, Error Handling & Validation
  • User Authentication & Authorization

(If you don’t have a Pluralsight membership, sign up for a free trial here.)

Here are some of the comments about the course from Twitter and the course discussion page:

Awesome WebAPI + Angular course!

Thanks for your great course, it helped me to understand how to establish different CURD action between front end and back end.

oh yea! Your course rocks too! Even a beginner can view this course and your other one and be successful.

Great course, it is really concise and to-the-point.

First of all I would like to congratulate you on publishing a fantastic set of courses on AngularJS Line of Business Apps and more so recently Angular Front to Back with Web API. I think what stands out for me is the way in which you provide holistic approach to delivering excellent technical content.

I Love your angularjs pluralsight courses. Learnt a lot and using at work.

Your classes on AngularJS on pluralsight is my reason am better than my peers, thanks

Thank you for building a .Net course F2B that uses (vm = this) and (controller as) syntax!!! You rock.

ScreenShot

Enjoy!

January 12, 2015

What Developers are Saying About: AngularJS Line of Business Applications

Filed under: AngularJS @ 8:56 am
Tags: , ,

Developers interested in building great business applications with AngularJS are finding the Pluralsight course: AngularJS Line of Business Applications to be just what they need.

(If you don’t have a Pluralsight membership, sign up for a free trial here.)

Here are some of the comments in the discussion section for the course:

You’ve built a complete application, which is awesome!

Excellent course. One of the best ones I have ever seen.

Deborah, this is by far the best Angular.js course I’ve seen in the last two years. And believe me, I watch them all. But somehow you’ve managed to explain it so well that I really feel like I can finally make my own applications!

Great course, wish I would of started with it :)

Deborah, you speak human language. I loved your style of teaching!

Thanks for the great course! I really appreciated the systematic reinforcement of software engineering best practices that never fell by the wayside, even while building a demo app.

One of the best course on AngularJS at intermediates level. What i liked the most is the pace & clarity on each of the topic covered. I would highly recommend this course.

image

This course covers the following topics:

  • Introduction
  • Building the First Page
  • Accessing Data
  • Routing to Multiple Views
  • Building Data Entry Forms
  • Validating Forms
  • Defining Business Logic in an Angular Service
  • Visualizing Data With Charts
  • Exception Handling
  • Final Words

Enjoy!

December 17, 2014

Reusing Validation Messages in AngularJS

Filed under: AngularJS @ 1:03 pm
Tags: ,

One of the many new features in AngularJS 1.3 is the ability to reuse validation messages.

When displaying validation messages, you may find that you often reuse very similar messages:

“Class name must be entered.”  “Start date must be entered.”  “End date must be entered.”

Wouldn’t it be nice if you could reuse error messages instead of repeating them throughout the application? Angular 1.3 provides an ngMessagesInclude directive as part of the new Angular ngMessages module that allows you to share error messages throughout an application.

This post shows you how to use this new feature.

For more information about the new features in AngularJS 1.3, check out my latest Pluralsight course, authored with Joe Eames:

What’s New in Angular 1.3

screenshot

Reusing validation messages in Angular requires the following steps:

  1. Create an HTML file for the common messages.
  2. Include the HTML file in the same element as ngMessages.
  3. Override any messages as required.

Let’s take it one step at a time.

NOTE: If you are new to using ngMessages, check out the Angular 1.3 course.

Create the Messages File

The first step is to create the HTML template file for the common message text. In this file, add HTML with an ng-message attribute for each message. The value of the ng-message attribute must be a valid $error object key. That key is often the name of the validation type, for example: required, minlength, or maxlength.

The message text itself should be generic, meaning it should not refer to specific field names or field requirements.

The resulting HTML file could look something like this:

<span ng-message=”required”>
This item cannot be blank.</span>
<span ng-message=”minlength”>
You have not met this item’s minimum length.</span>
<span ng-message=”maxlength”>
You have exceeded this item’s maximum length.</span>

Include the HTML File

The next step is to include the messages HTML file for each input element that wants to reuse the messages using ng-messages-include. Insert this directive in the same element containing the ng-messages directive.

The following shows an Email field with a label, textbox, and validation. The entire form-group is shown below to provide context for the validation messages.

<div class=”form-group”
     ng-class=”{‘has-error':classForm.inputInstructorEmail.$invalid &&
                            classForm.inputInstructorEmail.$touched}”>
    <label class=”col-md-2 control-label”
           for=”inputInstructorEmail”>Instructor’s Email</label>

    <div class=”col-md-4″>
        <input class=”form-control”
               type=”email”
               id=”inputInstructorEmail”
               name=”inputInstructorEmail”
               placeholder=”instructor’s email”
               ng-model=”vm.class.instructorEmail”
               required
               minlength=”6″ />
    </div>
    <span class=”help-block has-error”
          ng-if=”classForm.inputInstructorEmail.$touched”
          ng-messages=”classForm.inputInstructorEmail.$error”
          ng-messages-include=”app/errorMessages.html” >
        <span ng-message=”email”>
            Instructor’s email must be a valid email address.
        </span>
    </span>
</div>

Notice that the only ng-message directive included in the code above is for an invalid email address. This one is required here because it was not included in the messages html file.

Override Messages as Required

There may be times when you want a customized message. In those cases, you can easily override a message by simply adding a child element with an ng-message directive. The child element ng-message will always override any message defined for the same key in the included messages file.

    <span class=”help-block has-error”
          ng-if=”classForm.inputInstructorEmail.$touched”
          ng-messages=”classForm.inputInstructorEmail.$error”
          ng-messages-include=”app/errorMessages.html” >
        <span ng-message=”email”>
            Instructor’s email must be a valid email address.
        </span>
        <span ng-message=”minlength”>
            Instructor’s email must be at least 6 characters in length.
        </span>

    </span>

Use this technique any time you want to reuse messages throughout your application.

Enjoy!

November 25, 2014

Exception Handling in an AngularJS Application

Filed under: AngularJS @ 9:25 am

Wouldn’t it be great if everything always just worked? That we never had a runtime error… That the server-side Web services were always available and worked? But we know that is not the case. Things go wrong.

The most common ways to handle exceptions in an Angular application are:

  • With a JavaScript try/catch block
    • You can add a try/catch block around code that could fail
    • That allows you to catch specific errors and handle them appropriately.
  • You can use the Angular global exception handler
    • Angular has a built-in service, called $exceptionHandler, that catches exceptions
    • By decorating this service, you can tailor it to the needs of your application.
  • When working with promises, you can also add failure or catch functions

This post covers the second option, using the Angular global exception handler.

If you are interested in more information, I cover exception handling in detail in my Pluralsight course: “AngularJS Line of Business Applications“.

image

Decorating $exceptionHandler

Angular provides a built-in global exception handling service called $exceptionHandler. Any uncaught exception is delegated to this service. This service only catches exceptions, not communication errors (such as 404 not found) or syntax errors.

The default implementation of $exceptionHandler logs any exceptions to the browser console. You can change this functionality by decorating the $exceptionHandler service.

Say we wanted to change the default global exception handler to display a message to the user. We could accomplish this by decorating the $exceptionHandler service as shown in the code below:

image

  • Line 14:
    • The above code configures the application with a decorator.
    • The code needs the Angular built-in $provide service, so it is passed as a parameter to the configuration function.
  • Line 15:
    • The $provide service is used internally as part of Angular’s component registration process.
    • The decorator method of this service can intercept requests and provide different or additional functionality.
    • The decorator method takes two parameters:
      • The first parameter is the string name of the service being decorated. In this case, it is the $exceptionHandler service.
      • The second parameter is a min-safe array containing the name of each decorator function parameter and then the decorator function itself.
  • Line 16:
    • The decorator function has a dependency on $delegate. So $delegate is listed in the min-safe array.
    • $delegate provides the original service to the method. This allows you to call the base implementation of that service.
  • Line 17:
    • $delegate is passed as a parameter to the decorator function.
  • Line 18:
    • This method returns a decorated $exceptionHandler service object.
    • The returned function has two parameters: the exception and the cause.
  • Line 19+20:
    • In this example, the code in the returned function replaces the exception message with a custom message.
  • Line 21:
    • Then it uses $delegate to call the base implementation of the service.
    • The base implementation simply logs the error to the console.
  • Line 22
    • Lastly, this code adds an alert to notify the user of the issue.

Now, any time that an unhandled exception occurs, the message is logged to the console (the default behavior) *and* the user is notified with an alert.

You can add anything you need to this function. For example, you may want to add more extensive logging or a more detailed message.

Enjoy!

November 24, 2014

Creating Pretty Tabs with HTML and CSS

Filed under: AngularJS @ 4:31 pm
Tags: , ,

If you are building data entry forms with HTML (using AngularJS or ASP.NET or other technologies), you may find that you need more space than can fit onto one page. In that case, you may want to implement tabs.

In my AngularJS course entitled “AngularJS Line of Business Applications“, I demonstrate how to build data entry forms using tabs. The result looked like this:

image

I also showed a version with styled tabs like this:

image

This blog post details how to change the rectangular tabs from the first image to the more stylized tabs in the second image.

To keep the example simple, we’ll work with just the tabs:

image

The code for the page shown above with the rectangular tabs is as follows:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head lang=”en”>
    <meta charset=”UTF-8″>
    <title>Acme Product Management</title>

    <!– Style sheets –>
    <link href=”css/bootstrap.css” rel=”stylesheet”/>
    <link href=”css/app.css” rel=”stylesheet”/>
</head>

<body>
  <div class=”panel panel-primary”>
    <div class=”panel-heading” style=”font-size:large”>
        Acme Product Management
    </div>

    <div class=”panel-body”>
        <div class=”wizard”>
            <a>
                Basic Information
            </a>
            <a>
                Price Details
            </a>
            <a>
                Search Tags
            </a>
        </div>
   </div>

  </div>
</body>

</html>

Notice that the tabs are defined with anchor (<a>) tags. Notice also that this HTML links to two css files:

body {
    background-color: #C6D9F1;
}

.wizard a {
    background: #efefef;
    display: inline-block;
    margin-right: 5px;
    min-width: 150px;
    outline: none;
    padding: 10px 40px 10px;
    position: relative;
    text-decoration: none;
}
.wizard .active {
    background: #007ACC;
    color: #fff;
}

We’ll need to add some additional styles to the app.css file in order to implement the arrow-style tabs as shown below:

image

First, we’ll add a before selector for the anchor tag:

.wizard a:before {
        width: 0;
        height: 0;
        border-top: 20px inset transparent;
        border-bottom: 20px inset transparent;
        border-left: 20px solid #fff;
        position: absolute;
        content: “”;
        top: 0;
        left: 0;
    }

This creates the “cut out” on the left side of the tabs.

Then we’ll add the triangle shaped arrow on the right side of the tabs using an after selector for the anchor tag:

.wizard a:after {
        width: 0;
        height: 0;
        border-top: 20px inset transparent;
        border-bottom: 20px inset transparent;
        border-left: 21px solid #efefef;
        position: absolute;
        content: “”;
        top: 0;
        right: -20px;
        z-index: 2;
    }

Lastly, we want to ignore the “cut out” border on the left side of the first tab and the arrow on the right side of the last tab. This gives us a clean look for the far left and far right of the tab bar:

.wizard a:first-child:before,
.wizard a:last-child:after {
        border: none;
    }

And if you want to round the corners at the far left and far right of the tab bar, you can round them with this:

.wizard a:first-child {
        -webkit-border-radius: 8px 0 0 0px;
        -moz-border-radius: 8px 0 0 0px;
        border-radius: 8px 0 0 0px;
    }

.wizard a:last-child {
        -webkit-border-radius: 0 8px 0px 0;
        -moz-border-radius: 0 8px 0px 0;
        border-radius: 0 8px 0px 0;
    }

Try building this simple page and then adding each css class and running the application to see its effect on the tabs before adding the next css class.

Enjoy!

October 2, 2014

AngularJS: Visualizing Data with Charts

Filed under: AngularJS @ 5:20 pm

Data visualization can help users see patterns in an often overwhelming amount of data. One key technique for visualizing data is to display that data in a set of charts.

image

Because charting is a common requirement, there are JavaScript libraries available for building charts. D3.js is one such library. D3.js is a JavaScript library for manipulating documents based on data. It provides powerful data visualization components. With all of its power and flexibility comes a steep learning curve.

Luckily, you won’t have to learn d3 to build charts with Angular. Angular-charts is a wrapper around basic d3 features for use in Angular. You can use Angular-charts to build pie, bar, line, point, and area charts.

If you want to create charts in your Angular application, try out the charting example on the Angular-charts page.

Or check out the “Visualizing Data with Charts” module in my “AngularJS Line of Business Applications” course.

Enjoy!

October 1, 2014

Angular Talk at Visual Studio Live! in Washington DC on October 7th, 2014

Filed under: AngularJS,Visual Studio @ 5:25 pm

I am very excited to talk about AngularJS at the upcoming Visual Studio Live! conference in Washington DC!

The session is entitled “Build an Angular and Bootstrap Web Application in Visual Studio from the Ground Up“. It is aimed at intermediate level developers that are new to or just getting started with AngularJS. Because this *is* a Visual Studio conference, the sample application is built using a Visual Studio Web Site for the Angular application and ASP.NET Web API for the back-end Web service. (Though the talk only walks through the Angular code, not the Web API code … we only have 75 minutes!)

If you are looking for the code for this session, you can find it on github here.

If you are not familiar with github, just click the Download ZIP button in the bottom right to download a zip file containing the code.

image

If you are interested in more information about Angular, check out my latest Pluralsight course: “AngularJS Line of Business Applications”. The sample application for the course is built from scratch using WebStorm, but could be created using Visual Studio.

Enjoy!

August 1, 2014

Boldly Code With Us: Preview of Visual Studio Live! Washington, D.C.

Filed under: AngularJS,General,Visual Studio @ 4:09 pm

Earlier this week I presented a preview of my two sessions for the Visual Studio Live! conference coming up in Washington DC on October 6-9, 2014. My two sessions at the conference are:

  • New IDE and Editor Features in Visual Studio 2013
  • Build an Angular and Bootstrap Web Application in Visual Studio from the Ground Up

In the preview, I outlined some of the new IDE and Editor features and then selected one to demonstrate.

I then provided an introduction to AngularJS, specifically what it is and why you may want to use it for development of client-side Web applications.

If you are interested, the recording of this preview presentation is posted here.

Enjoy!

PS circleCheck out my Pluralsight courses!

July 30, 2014

Learn AngularJS at VSLive in Washington DC

Filed under: AngularJS,General @ 5:24 pm

If you’ve ever been to Washington DC you know that it is filled with pomp and circumstance. It seems every activity is wrapped in ceremony.

That may be fun when touring history … but no so much when you are writing a Web application. When building an application you want to get work done, not spend lots of time on ritual and setup and ceremony.

AngularJS is all about simplification … getting rid of ritual and ceremony. With AngularJS …

  • You don’t have to write code to navigate the document object model (DOM) as you do with JQuery. No need to id everything and find the Ids on the page.
  • You don’t have to write any code that maps properties from your model to the UI and back again … AngularJS provides automatic two-way data binding.
  • You can easily call a Web service such as Web API.
  • You can write clean Web code!

Join me in Washington DC October 6-9 and learn how to use Angular to build your next Web application.

Use this promo code: DCSPK13 or click on the image below for more information or to register. You’ll save $400!

DCSPK13

Enjoy!

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