An ability of Firefox to detect irrecoverable tabs

An ability of Firefox to detect irrecoverable tabs



A while back we discussed about the ability of Firefox to restore tabs and sessions if the browser had closed unexpectedly. However there may be occasions that one of the tab is misbehaving and causing the crash. With the above auto-restore feature there is a likely risk that the browser would close again. I just observed that there is another feature in Firefox which detects the frequent crash of the browser and in that case displays a message to this user to manually select which tabs/windows that he feels are safe to restore. You can see a screenshot something similar as below:


 



 


 


 


 

Embedded Object treated as an image

Embedded Object treated as an image


I just wanted to share a little personal experience with Microsoft Word. I have my personal word document which contains an embedded zip object containing my Todolist files. I keep it as a single capsule for portabiity reasons. I just have one observation that when the object is copied using Word’s clipboard operations and pasted to Explorer and even after that closing the Word document you would be getting a message like ‘You placed a large image in the clipboard’.


I admit that binary objects are images from the DEV perspective but just thought Word should be more explanatory in the nature of the message when it comes to addressing and clearing the doubts of a non-tech-savvy person.


This applies to Microsoft Word 2003.

Invisible Textboxes with FireFox

Invisible Textboxes with FireFox


Today morning, as my FireFox requested an upgrade to the newer version and I religiously clicked yes. When it completed the update, it wanted to restart itself and I adhered to its order too. But after restart interestingly, some of my most commonly used websites presented their login pages with invisible textboxes. But when click somewhere in the context, it could recognize the textbox element.


An amazing persistence ability of session of FireFox to Task Manager End Process

An amazing persistence ability of session of FireFox to Task Manager End Process


Today morning my system behaved little weird. I am trying to be little optimistic. The good old system with its meagre resources on RAM had been that way for long though anyway. But that is another story. :) The FireFox was getting too much of memory and after a good deal of haggling and bargaining for well over five minutes, I chose to outsource the deal of paying tribute to the process life of FireFox.


When I restarted FireFox, I was amazed to see the following message like ‘FireFox session was killed and if I wanted to restore session’. Task Manager warned me before end process that sessions would be destroyed without any chance of resurrection but interestingly,  FireFox offered me to help restore damaged and sabotaged sessions.



This is one good example that we should also try getting into our applications like persisting data so that the user can be spared for his hard word in case of catastrophic failures.

DOM Inspector Tool in FireFox

DOM Inspector Tool in FireFox

Those of you developing extensive JavaScript or UI based web-based applications would have encountered and spent most of the time in creating alert to see if a div exists and document.getElementById (width) etc.

Just was trying out FireFox (same as Netscape family, I hope).

It has a real cool tool embedded called DOMInspector, which aides in inspecting the DOM Structure of the URL that is being viewed.

Check out FireFox at: http://www.mozilla.org/products/firefox/ 


/* Migrated from Daffodilnet Express — posted on December 3, 2005 */

Working with System.Web.Mail namespace…

Working with System.Web.Mail namespace…

We use System.Web.Mail namespace to send emails from our .NET Applications. It uses two main classes called MailMessage and SmtpServer. The latter having a single static property to indicate the email server (smtp host) to use and a public method taking an instance of MailMessage carrying the mail to be delivered.

Internally it is supposed to be a wrapper on the CDO Object and lot of P/Invoke stuff being builtin, the exception stack too can be significantly larger. Quite interestingly, there is one website called http://www.systemwebmail.com/ which I would like to share with the readers which discusses at length, System.Web.Mail namespace, FAQ etc.


/* Migrated from Daffodilnet Express — posted on 11th December 2005 */

Managing Remote Terminal Sessions — The Easy Way

Managing Remote Terminal Sessions — The Easy Way

Windows 2000 brought in an elegant way of working on remote desktops by the concept of Terminal Services. But it was an additional Windows component that needed to be installed and configured, which meant additional license costs and administerial functions to setup and followup. However, it did gain in a perspective that the dependency on a third party application be it commercialware (like pcAnywhere etc) or an opensource (VNC, RealVNC etc) was broken down.

Windows XP took this one step ahead with the concept of Remote Desktop by way of RDP protocol. However, it allowed only one user to work on the system, transferring the control appropriately.

I have been using Windows 2000 Terminal Services for a long long time and one daunting and nightmarish problem that I had to face is that to ensure that users logoff rather than disconnect. When you disconnect a session, Windows Terminal Services remembers this and prevents any new users from opening a connection unless the free sessions are available. The default session count, I guess, is 2 for Windows Terminal Services.

Last week, while casually surfing the web, I came across two nice tools to manage this scenario:

  1. qwinsta.exe:  Displays information about Terminal Sessions
  2. rwinsta.exe: Resets the session subsystem hardware and software to default values. Effectively, you can use this tool to reset disconnected users so that other users can login.

From a developer’s perspective, I feel, that we can have a simple Windows Form application in C# to manage these. Perhaps this weekend, I would try to get a small application and publish it over my personal website for other readers’ use.

From C#, we just need to use WTSAPI32.dll using DllImport to manage the functionalities of QWInsta and RWInsta. More information about this tool over here:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/default.asp?url=/library/en-us/termserv/termserv/run_time_linking_to_wtsapi32_dll.asp


/* Migrated from Daffodilnet Express — posted on January 1, 2006 */

Developing Applications for the Web is a breeze with Internet Explorer Developer Toolbar…


Developing Applications for the Web is a breeze with Internet Explorer Developer Toolbar…


Debugging a web application, particularly its HTML counterpart like image path, Stylesheet, Scripting and design template issues has always been a nightmare for web developers and this always never fails to spark off arguments between the designers of the team, who would be stubborn for look and feel and developers reluctant to apply apprehending the implementation difficulties and browser compatibility issues.


There had been little tools to this perspective from various vendors like DOMInspector from Mozilla FireFox, MyIE2 had its own Scripting Inspector.


Now you can check out an Internet Explorer Developer Toolbar from Microsoft, which is available from this URL: http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?FamilyID=e59c3964-672d-4511-bb3e-2d5e1db91038&displaylang=en.


However,  please take note of the following:


  1. The Toolbar is still in BETA stage.
  2. The Toolbar gets installed only if IE 6 is installed.

/* Migrated from Daffodilnet Express — posted on February 22, 2006 */

Clearing IE Cache

Clearing IE Cache

Cache — the five letter buzz word remains as a double-edged sword. System Administrators and Network Administrators appreciate it and recommend it for simple reason, that network bandwidth is conserved. Developers, to an extent blame it since sometimes Old data crops up.

There has been a lot of programmatic options we stipulate from our webpages to clear cache like Pragma, Cache-Control directives.

Here comes one solution from Microsoft called ClearCache. Check it out at: http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?familyid=5CBD4659-3B28-4801-8729-05335902CE79&displaylang=en


/* Migrated from Daffodilnet Express — posted on February 2, 2006 */

Access to the path containing ‘hash.web’ is getting denied.

 


Access to the path containing ‘hash.web’ is getting denied.


After installing Visual Studio .NET and F5 a couple of times, I used to get this error frequently. The only resolution was to wait for upto 5 to10 mins or restart system, since a folder in Temporary ASP.NET files containing web.config gets locked up automatically.


After searching a while in KBs, Forums, I found one closest matching solution, which solved my problem. Just wanted to share with other readers who would also be experiencing this issue. The problem occurs significantly if you touch web.config and ASP.NET has significant memory consumption (as seen in Windows Task Manager)


There is a service called Indexing Service which runs in the system. During F5, ASP.NET tries to JIT compile the new dll (as my understanding goes) and when simultaneously ASP.NET and Indexing service goes to the specified set of cache files, the deadlock occurs and ASP.NET throws this exception.


Solutions:


  • Keep Indexing Service Manual or Stop It
  • In Indexing Service Preferences, Make C:/Winnt/Microsoft.NET to be excluded or placed in the exclusion catalog so that Indexing Service will not access this location.

/* Migrated from Daffodilnet Express — posted on October 15, 2004 */