Webcasts On ADO.NET

Repost from 24th March 2004Did another webcast on ADO.NET v2 and Whidbey this morning for the US MSDN folk. Have part 2 of it coming up Friday morning (3am Brizzie time) – 9am PST Thursday (their time).

Didn’t have any performance problems with the equipment today. I’ve added more memory to my notebook to take it up to 1GB. Makes such a difference when running Virtual PC as I was able to give the pc image around 600M of memory to work with. That fits VS/Whidbey, Yukon, SQL Profiler, etc. in memory just fine.

One thing that’s changed with VB.NET that I’m not keen on is the removal of the variable name after the “Next” statement by default ie:

For intCntr = 1 To 10

Next

I really prefer having “Next intCntr” because when you get lots of nested loops and big code blocks, it’s useful to be able to know which loop is which.

Basic Grids

Repost from 13th March 2004Was looking for a really basic (ie lightweight also) grid control. In VB6, we used to use the MS Flexgrid. It was ok but a bit too basic. For example, you needed to handle all keystrokes yourself.

It’s a pity a non-bound grid wasn’t part of the standard toolkit for Windows Forms in .NET.

However, the VB Resource Kit for .NET (free) includes a number of cool components. The one that provided the answer was the FlexGrid from Component One. Having now worked with it for a few days, I really like it. It’s simple and it seems to work. It’s well upgraded since the version in VB6. They also include a FlexGrid Classic which is closer to the old control but I like the enhancements they’ve made to the new one. Very easy to use and the help file for it gets installed into the standard help in VS.NET. The help file was also “helpful” which is always a good thing 🙂

A few things about using it weren’t too intuitive (like setting different colors for individual rows) but the help file had examples.

Recommended if you need a lightweight grid!

Fish

Repost from 8th March 2004Finished another book. “Fish” by Stephen Lundin, Harry Paul and John Christensen. It was billed as “a remarkable way to boost morale and improve results”. A lot of the business schools refer to it. My second-oldest step son manages a maccas restaurant and they use it in training.

I was left with the feeling that they’d stretched a 4 page story to over a hundred pages. The basic message was:

Choose your attitude (first thing you can do each day is choose the attitude you bring to work)
Play (have fun at work even if the work is boring)
Be Present (for your customers – make them feel important and that you are completely “present” when dealing with them – not distracted)
Make Their Day (do something special for them)

It’s based on the Pike Place Fish Market in Seattle. The basic message was fine but the case studies in the book were made up. They didn’t sound real to me while I was reading them.

The overall message is good though.