Web Site Performance

I came across a post on StackOverflow.com regarding web site performance. Quite often you can take a look at your application and find 10 different ways to make it more efficient. Depending on your environment, you may have many different ways to increase performance. For instance, in a shared hosting environment, you’ll likely be limited as to what you can do on the server, but can tweak your application appropriately.


Here are a few things I’d recommend:


  1. Compress your HTML output using built-in compression or third party software like GZip.
  2. If you are using ASP.NET, make sure you minimize your ViewState by turning it off for everything and then determining what items actually need it. ViewState can add quite a bit to your output and as site hits begin to add up, so won’t your traffic.
  3. Move your images, CSS, and JavaScript files to a content delivery network (CDN) or sub-domain. Keep in mind that there are many parts to retrieving a site such as server through-put and bandwidth. At a minimum, you should use a sub-domain to send your files to the browser. This will allow the browser to load your page completely, even if the images, CSS, and JavaScript are not done loading. Finally, when using traffic tools, your images and other files will dominate the results. By moving your content files to another domain, you can provide better traffic reports.
  4. JavaScript files should be at the bottom of your HTML output. If your JavaScript files are at the top of the page and are rather large in size, the browser will attempt to download those before continuing down the page.
  5. Use a tool like CompressJavaScript.com to compress your JavaScript files. It’s also a good idea to compress your CSS.

If you have any more tips, or corrections to anything that I’ve listed above, be sure to comment about it here.


Digg this story here: http://digg.com/programming/Web_Site_Performance

Installing Team Foundation Server 2008 on SQL Server 2008

One of the prerequisites for TFS 2008 is that it must be installed to work with SQL Server 2005 SP2 or SQL Server 2008. However, TFS 2008, by itself, will not work with SQL Server 2008. You’ll receive an error message that your SQL Server instance is not compatible as I’ve mentioned at http://tinyurl.com/4shjod. You’ll receive other error messages such as Full Text not being installed. After struggling for a couple of days, I decided to ask one of my local TFS guru’s, Steve Andrews. He pointed me to an article that led me to Abdelhamid’s blog post at http://blogs.msdn.com/aabdou/archive/2008/05/13/team-foundation-server-sp1-beta-now-available.aspx. Following this, I was able to get it installed.

My MVC Talk at Philly.NET Code Camp 3

I’ll be presenting at the third code camp of 2008 for the Philly.NET code camp. Apparently, several other Microsoft MVPs and ASPInsiders will as well. It should be a great time. Be sure to register on phillydotnet.org.

Anyway, if you’ll be coming to my MVC talk, be sure to check back on my blog before the event. I’ll be posting some source code that will allow attendees to follow along during my talk.

Hope to see you there!

Microsoft Responds About Seinfeld Advertisement

After many technology professionals and marketing organizations questioned the first in a series of advertisements involving Bill Gates, Jerry Seinfeld, and Microsoft, an explanation was delivered. Earlier today, Microsoft published a response to several questions regarding the first advertisement; first by sending an internal message to employees of Microsoft, then by posting a public explanation at http://www.microsoft.com/presspass/windows/featureStories.aspx?story=660dee9e-9606-4e77-843e-ed81d83c0bfe.

It seems as though Microsoft is going to work with retailers such as Circuit City and Best Buy to offer store with-in a store concepts with Microsoft. Verizon Wireless, a US based cellular phone service provider, follows this method by providing store with-in a store concepts through Circuit City.

Microsoft’s Explanation of Seinfeld Advertisement

After many technology professionals and marketing organizations questioned the first in a series of advertisements involving Bill Gates, Jerry Seinfeld, and Microsoft, an explanation was delivered. Earlier today, Microsoft published a response to several questions regarding the first advertisement; first by sending an internal message to employees of Microsoft, then by posting a public explanation at http://www.microsoft.com/presspass/windows/featureStories.aspx?story=660dee9e-9606-4e77-843e-ed81d83c0bfe.


It seems as though Microsoft is going to work with retailers such as Circuit City and Best Buy to offer store with-in a store concepts with Microsoft. Verizon Wireless, a US based cellular phone service provider, follows this method by providing store with-in a store concepts through Circuit City.

Technology In Political Views

I usually don’t like mentioning anything political in my blog. However, this I found interesting. BetaNews has written several entries regarding the democratic and republic president and vice-president candidates. Here they are in order of publish date:

What do you think of their reviews?

IIS7 Integrated Mode and Global.asax

In IIS7, there are two modes for ASP.NET application pools: classic mode (only mode available for IIS6) and integrated mode. Integrated Mode offers quite a bit with IIS7 and is the recommended mode for application pools (more details at http://learn.iis.net/page.aspx/244/how-to-take-advantage-of-the-iis7-integrated-pipeline/). One of the changes is that the Integrated mode does not have access to the HttpContext during the Application_Start method in the global.asax. It also has an affect on HttpModules and HttpHandlers that reference the HttpContext as well. You’ll want to keep this in mind when building your application structure.

The First Microsoft and Seinfeld Advertisement

Mary Jo Foley posted a summary of the first Microsoft advertisement that played during tonight’s NFL game. Her full blog posting can be found at http://blogs.zdnet.com/microsoft/?p=1569#comments. For those of you that want to see the video, here it is:

Anyway, I must agree. While it did have an old Seinfeld humorous twist, it didn’t really advertise the company. What did you think? On a scale of 1-10 where 10 is the best, I’d give it a 4. There was no negativity towards Apple which is a plus, but the lack of Microsoft products being pushed kept it below a 5.

UPDATE: Now that I think about it more, I’m sure the upcoming advertisements will have to relate to this one in some sense. If not, it’s a waste of $300 million that could have been spent on improving some products.