LA.NET [EN]

Jul 23

[Disclaimer: I’ve received a copy of this book for review]

I’ve just finished reading the Professional IIS 7 and ASP.NET integrated programming book by Dr. Shramram. If you’re trying to understand how to leverage the new IIS 7 managed features, then this book is just what you need. If you don’t know what you must to to add a GUI interface to your own custom modules/handlers, then this book is for you too!If you want to learn how to administer IIS 7, then this book isn’t for you.

The book is really complete (in fact, it’s too complete, if such a thing exists – more details on this in the next paragraphs) reference that contains lots of examples that show you how to integrate your ASP.NET code with IIS 7 and how to extend IIS 7.  Having said this, I’ve found one or two things that annoyed me while I read the book.

For starterts, you’ll see lots of C# 2.0 code. Why not use C# 3.0? It simply doesn’t make sense to me, but ok, I can live with that…The second thing that I really didn’t like is the ammount of repetition that you’ll get in the book. For instance, you’ll get at least one chapter on how to extend the integrated configuration system which are illustrated with “dummy” classes. And then, in a following chapter you’ll end up developing “real” config classes for supporting an url module. My question is simple: why not build the necessary config classes for the module instead of “wasting” paper with the dummy classes?

And since I’m talking about repetitions,there’s really one thing I hated: why do we see pages of code which are repeated under the form of snippets so that the author can explain what each one of them do? Including the InitializeComponents is really really uncessary,if you ask me…

In conclusion, this book will give all you need if you’re interested in understanding how to integrate your ASP.NET code with IIS 7 or if you’re interested in seeing how to expand IIS 7. I’m giving it a 7.5/10 due to the ammount of unnecessary repetition that the book contains. If it weren’t for that, I wouldn’t have any problems in giving it an 8, but I can’t simply ignore the fact that this book has over 600 pages and it could really just have about 400 without any content loss!

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