Wi-Fi Security – Queen to WPA.. Checkmate..

Published on: Author: Mike Hall 1 Comment
  • In the beginning, nobody really cared
  • Then we heard that wireless Internet and networks could be intercepted
  • So we all set up WEP encryption
  • Last year, WEP Wi-Fi encryption was cracked in under a minute
  • So we all moved to WPA encryption
  • This year, WPA Wi-Fi encryption has been cracked. It takes between 12 and 15 minutes.
  • Time to move to WPA2, guys and gals..

This is from PC World (the magazine)

The work of Tews and Beck does not involve a dictionary attack, however.

To pull off their trick, the researchers first discovered a way to trick a WPA router into sending them large amounts of data. This makes cracking the key easier, but this technique is also combined with a “mathematical breakthrough,” that lets them crack WPA much more quickly than any previous attempt, Ruiu said.

Tews is planning to publish the cryptographic work in an academic journal in the coming months, Ruiu said. Some of the code used in the attack was quietly added to Beck’s Aircrack-ng Wi-Fi encryption hacking tool two weeks ago, he added.

One Response to Wi-Fi Security – Queen to WPA.. Checkmate.. Comments (RSS) Comments (RSS)

  1. lol It doesn’t“Malicious associations” are when wiselers devices can be actively made by crackers to connect to a company network through their cracking laptop instead of a company access point (AP). These types of laptops are known as “soft APs” and are created when a cracker runs some software that makes his/her wiselers network card look like a legitimate access point. Once the cracker has gained access, he/she can steal passwords, launch attacks on the wired network, or plant trojans. Since wiselers networks operate at the Layer 2 level, Layer 3 protections such as network authentication and virtual private networks (VPNs) offer no barrier. Wireless 802.1x authentications do help with protection but are still vulnerable to cracking. The idea behind this type of attack may not be to break into a VPN or other security measures. Most likely the cracker is just trying to take over the client at the Layer 2 level.

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