Mail clients.. setting up for a fall?

Published on: Author: Mike Hall Leave a comment

How do you receive email?

  1. An email client?
  2. Online?

I get mine through an email client, Outlook 2010. If you don’t know, this is part of the Microsoft Office Professional Plus set which includes Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Outlook, OneNote and Publisher. Mainly, I use Word, Outlook and OneNote, and occasionally the others. Re Outlook, I have four email accounts covering personal, business, registrations and Microsoft specific stuff, and I use the Contacts, Calendar and Notes sections all of the time.

I would find life very difficult without Microsoft Outlook and OneNote, and have Genie Timeline backing them up every 8 hours to a safe place.

The advantage of an email client is that you can pipe more than one account into it. The disadvantage is that if you lose the email client data files for any reason at all, you have lost everything except for what was still on your ISP mail server. It is absolutely imperative that you back up your files.

But wait.. if you only ever receive and send email, and you never use the other features apart from contacts, there is a way to always have your email and address book preserved.

Use the online access which ALL ISP’s provide these days. I will admit that the interfaces can be messy, BUT everything is safe, no backups required.

I picked up a new client recently who had lost her mail and contacts more than once in the past, and I suggested to her that she goes online for her mail. It has been plain sailing for her ever since ever since.

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