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My first misadventure with the As-seen-on-TV brownie miracle device

March 13th, 2010 by

Do you all remember that miraculous cookie pan-system, with the dividers that you plunked down in the batter, and pulled out when the baking was done, and then you placed it on its special stand and the sides dropped leaving the evenly cut peices displayed ready for ravenous children to come and disappear them instantly. Just $19.99, but if you order right now in the next 10 minutes, you get two. Well, while desparately looking for a gift of Ann last December 21, I bought one and wrapped it up. Had the sense to say it was To Us, just to be sure it wasn’t taken wrong. We had decided during the pitch, that it wouldn’t be valuable for us, because we don’t make a lot of baked deserts. But, I then picked up three brownie mix packages just to see what was available.


So today, I make my first batch of brownies in the device. I put the mix in the mixing bowl, and then read that the mix is sopposed to be added to the water/oil mixture. Wat? Me worry? I spoon in the egg replacer for three eggs, add the extra 6 tablespoons of water for the egg with the one for the mix. It called for 1/3 cup of oil, so I put a couple of glugs in the water and whisk it up. Dump the water in the mixture and mix it up. Coat all the pieces of the pan with a thick coating of Pam. Pour the brownie mixture in the pan, spread it sort of evenly, and insert the dividers. Carry the whole setup to the stove to put in the preheated oven. Damn! The rack is in the top position–wot me worry? Position the pan on the rack. Find a cookie sheet to put under it, and set the timer.


The timer goes off and I look and see a coating of bubbly liquid all around the edges of the sections. This is supposed to be cake-like. I get a consult from Ann. “That looks wierd.” says she. Tells me I have to measure when baking. Suggests a toothpick test. It comes out clean. How could it not? So out of the oven, take out the dividers. Not much sticking. Let it cool. Move the stand to the table from the stove top, almost letting the cookie sheet with contents slide off the the floor because the sides are down. Finally, the taste test. It is great as fudge candy, though a bit oily. One needs to have a napkin to clean up the fingers afterward. I am not sure that Marie C would call it a success. It probably won’t pull like taffy, but it sort of makes you want to try.


Life in the kitchen can only get better after 70, no?

Posted in Good Things in Life | No Comments »

Surprising thoughts that bubble up from the seething, gray ooze of the unconscious mind.

February 2nd, 2010 by

Last evening, after House, I tried to watch the ABC video about Young’s tell all of John Edwards.  Alas, it did not go well, as the video first didn’t play, then did, but jumped to another story, etc.  Afterwards, when I was telling Ann about what was making so much noise from the computer room, and was relating how one commenter from Iowa asserted that , if this had been known at the time of the election, Edwards would not have split the vote and Hillary would have one that election, and many more afterwards.  Ann remarked that Edwards was the great white hope for the elections.  Later, as I was spitting out the cinnamon-flavored solution that is supposed to re-mineralize my teeth, the seething, gray ooze of my unconscious mind blurped and painted the following thought across my stream of consciousness:  If John Edwards is the Great White hope, then is Moby Dick doomed?  I returned to the bedroom and sprang it on Ann, at which point we collapsed into virtual ROFLOL.


Hollis

*******************


OK, I admit to a very constrained life and I don’t read Text. ROFLOL?
Translation please.

Lee


*******************


Rolling On Floor, Laughing Out Loud. Simple, even if cryptic.


Hollis

******************


OK. Poor Johnny……. What’s a poor Southern Gentleman to do?


This isn’t to your point but I take pleasure, perhaps sadistic, knowing that English Majors, at least, will be reading Moby Dick, and his good friend Ahab, long after John Edwards has passed on.


Lee

*****************


” This isn’t to your point…”  Actually, that may be the point; as whatever hope John Edwards embodied was just a mirage.  Moby Dick still swims every time someone picks up the book and reads “My name is Ishmael….”


Southern Gentlemen, obviously need to be fitted with chastity pants; not to mention hair shirts.


Hollis

****************


Hollis, I’m glad to find that I was not too far from your point.


Personally, I’m a skater. I like to stay on the surface of things.
And when you dance across those 19th Century waves, it becomes apparent that, with a friend like Ahab, Moby Dick is doomed from the very first word. Just being out there on that cold ocean is enough.
It is one Hell of a story.


Once you start to ask who, or what, was Ahab and who, or what, was Moby Dick, and why were they attached to opposite ends of a whaling line, things get complicated. There is no end to the possible answers to all that. Under the surface, clarity is not assured.


Actually, I don’t really have a problem with all the who, what and why’s. Or all the answers that get generated. But these all take time and there may be new who, what and why’s. Like who, or what, is behind the closet door, and why? (Or more probably, who cares?)


However and more importantly, how might We (the Specie) find our way to the Stars? And how? And why? These are the questions authors could now be alluding to. Actually, I find, some already do. In what seems to me the strangest places. As in Salman Rushdie’s “The Enchantress of Florence.”


It is those questions I want out there. And those answers to get out there to be contemplated, and absorbed into the cultures.


When I list all the subjects that must be resolved prior to liftoff, it turns out to be nothing less than the Second Coming. Maybe we will go a little less prepared. We usually do.


Lee

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Love Letter to the First Garden

December 12th, 2009 by

 


Bumalakawii_Creating the Garden anew


 


Bum II_Garden in production


 


9-01-2009 September Pictures: Harvest Frenzy


 


Where did all the flowers go?


 


The albums listed above constitute a love letter that Ann’s garden dictated to me during the course of this last growing season.  It all started when I was telling our garden about the exciting times the First Garden had when the First Lady and the kids from the school were having during the ground breaking of the First Garden, while I was laying the hoses for the water system.  Our garden said that they had myths about receiving messages from the East Coast gardens over the continent wide root network.  But that all ended when the homesteaders came and ploughed the prairie.  After that, they got messages from the homestead gardens for a while, but then those disappeared.  Now, messages have to go through Winnipeg or The Alamo.  However, they can only get messages returned from Winnipeg.  If they try to go farther, then the roots get frozen and the message is lost.  Messages through The Alamo only transmit during the brief rainy season, and never get back.  The massive forests that once ran the backbone roots have been disappearing faster than can be imagined.  They commissioned the Kudzu plants to develop a new network, but every time an advance was made, it would mysteriously disappear.  The Mississippi River is now running too fast to float even a Kudzu vine across, and the mud roots keep getting dredged.  The last effort was to piggy back a line across an Interstate bridge, and the system engineers were in the final test phase, when the bridge collapsed.  The West Coast gardens are now resigned to the loss of the contact with the East Coast region, tragic as it is.


 


So I reported what little information there was from the White House about the First Garden.  Which was zilch for a long time.  Then there was news that the peas and lettuce had been used in an official meal for the school kids that were at the ground breaking.  There were speeches and a few pictures, and then the harvest was gobbled down and gone.  After that, a Football Hero, who was just back from some kind of rehab, was walked through and a cook explained that the First House was trying to break the binge eating-rehab cycle with good healthy food, in moderation, from local gardens.  (Like a Football Hero wants to know about that—they are all grab and go.)  Our garden pointed out that nobody at the First Garden was helping it to be as beautiful as it could be.  How could it do well if it hadn’t been double-dug and with no companion flowers?  So, our garden has sat for innumerable photographic sessions just to get the pictures right to communicate with and tell the first garden what it can really be if it sneaks in a volunteer Violet or two.  Perhaps a Calendula or an Oriental Poppy.


 


So, we composed a plan, the garden and I.  We would upload the pictures to a cloud provider.  The gardens had never thought to use the clouds as a communication medium.  They were awestruck.  Then, as the White House had started to use FaceBook as a communication tool, I would send them a message to tell them which cloud to corral to enable the pictures to be rained on the First Garden.  I didn’t have the heart to try and explain that the President would have to use his much vaunted Geek capabilities to bring up the albums on his BlackBerry, put it screen down next to the potatoes, who have the eyes of the garden, and who would see the images, transmit them to the cabbages, who have the heads and brains of the Garden.  Then all the plants in the garden could see what the First Garden could really be, if one of the caretakers had the realization that a garden could be beautiful, as well as productive, and all would be better for it.  But alas, The First House only uses FaceBook for its push technology, and never looks at any of the 6,000,000 messages it might receive therefrom in a week.  There will be no BlackBerries stuffed into the garden to enlighten the plants—it seems the First Man can’t do anything right these days.

Posted in dotP | No Comments »

Matzos Omelet–A variation on a bacon pizza

December 11th, 2009 by

My wife was bringing home a really good pizza which was made on a round thin crust, and topped with just a little bit of cheese, green onions, chopped tomatoes, kippered salmon bits and lots of bacon bits.  I wondered if I could do something similar if I replaced the bacon with gorgonzola and blue cheese, and used a round of matzos for the crust.  I never found the round matzos, so I used a square one.  The result wasn’t nearly so good, and certainly not as good as the fried matzos we used to have.  So I googled fried matzos, and it offered motzo brei and motzo brie.  I picked one entry from the motzo brie:


http://www.chow.com/recipes/10899


Matza Brie Recipe
From: The Jewish Festival Cookbook , by Fannie Engle and Gertrude Blair


I read that thread; then thought about how I could do it differently.


My Matzo Brie doesn’t use water rinses or squeezing the extra water out of the softened matzos, nor added salt.  But I do use pasta sauce, a topping of tomato, red pepper, and green onion and a topping of pepper-jack cheese, crumbled gorgonzola, and crumbled blue cheese.  Consequently, it is a savory dinner entree.


Ingredients:


2 matzos squares, broken into 1 to 2 inch pieces, and smaller crumbles.
3 eggs plus some milk (I use original flavor soy milk- organic)
4 soup-spoons of pasta (I use TJ’s Organic Pasta Sauce, but Haggen’s mushroom pasta sauce would work as well.)
A quantity of pepper-jack cheese cubed small
A quantity of crumbled gorgonzola cheese
A quantity of crumbled blue cheese.
(The three cheeses make a respectable pile in a cereal bowl, but the amount of each is definitely set to your individual taste.  It takes some experimentation, though the ultimate taste is very forgiving.  I think of blue-zola cheese as providing the over-riding taste and the salt.)


Some chopped tomato–again to taste and preference.  I have been using up the tiny green tomatoes that have ripened since the first cold night got the plants in September.  I figure that they are mostly providing acid, and grapefruit sections would work as well, but I am not going to try that.


A chopped green onion, again to taste.  I use a small, thin green onion that Ann is still finding out in the garden, even though most of the garden is frozen solid.


Chopped red pepper-a quarter of a small one, but I am sure you can use more of you really like them.


Enough margarine to keep it from sticking when you dish it up.  I use TJ’s Earth Balance Organic buttery spread, as that is all we have, but I don’t know how much.  I would estimate about half a stick, if it came in  sticks, but it comes in a tub.  I take a knife and carve out an angled section, chop it up in the frying pan and estimate if that is enough.  If not, I add more.


 


Equipment:
A whisk
a soup spoon
a table knife, for cracking the eggs, and then slicing out the margarine.
a salad fork, for prying out the frozen cheese crumbles.
a large mixing bowl for the matzos crumble and pasta sauce
a medium mixing bowl in which to whisk the three eggs
a whisk
a silicon spatula for the final mix of the egg and matzos, and helping with spreading of the toppings.
a pancake turner for lifting the omelet by the quarter out of the pan


A stainless-steel skillet with an aluminum heat spreader stuck badly the first time I tried this.  (I later learned to cook at a lower heat.)
an oven


Putting it all together:


1: Dice the pepper-jack cheese so it is about the size of the crumbles of the gorgonzola.  Then add the crumbled gorgonzola and the crumbled blue cheese in the cereal bowl.  (I keep the gorgonzola and blue-cheese in the freezer and loosen the quantity I want with the salad fork.)  Set aside.


2:) Chop the tomato, red-pepper and green onion into fairly small pieces (same size as the crumbled gorgonzola).  Put these in a second cereal bowl and mix.


3:) Crumble the matzos into the large mixing bowl.  Spoon the pasta sauce out of the jar and stir it all together.


4:) Crack the eggs into the medium mixing bowl, add the milk, and whisk it till there is froth and your arm feels like it is falling off.


5:) Start preheating the oven to 375 degrees f, or there about.  Pull out skillet and put the margarine into it.  When you can’t stand it any more, turn on the burner at 6 (not 7 which is full heat all the time) to heat up the skillet and clarify the margarine. 


6:) Add the eggs to the matzos crumble in the large mixing bowl and mix with the silicon spatula.


7:) Switch the preheated oven to bake.


8:) When the margarine has clarified, and there are only small bubbles popping here and there, swirl the fat all around and dump the matzos-egg mix into the skillet.  Use the silicon scrapper to spread the matzo crumble evenly. (I get a lot less sticking to the pan and can use a lot less margarine if I turn the burner down to 5 as soon as I dump in the matzos-egg mix.)


9:)  Quickly, spread the tomato mix evenly over the matzo-egg layer.  And then, just as quickly, spread the cheese mix on top of that.  Place the skillet into the oven.  Make sure the oven is on bake.  Set the timer for 8 minutes and start it timing.  Turn off burner on the stove top before you burn yourself.  (I like it better when I put the tomato mix over the cheese mix.)


10:)  Run hot water into the large mixing bowl, add detergent, and wash up all the utensils  you have used except the pan cake turner, which you have used to spread the margarine in the skillet (yes?).  Finish preparing the table.  Place the plates near the stove top.


11:) Pull the skillet out of the oven when the timer goes off.  The cheeses will have all melted, and the omelet will have a reddish cast.  Divide in quarters in the pan, and lift out each quarter separately, and in one piece, if you can.  Of course, no harm is done if it folds or falls apart. 


Ann and I will each eat a half of the omelet with just a green salad afterwards.  (You should prepare that first, if you don’t have any left over, as I do.)


Preparation seems to be glacial while you are dicing the pepper-jack and the tomatoes.  But it picks up when you turn on the oven, mix the eggs with the matzos, and start heating the skillet.  Then it is bam-bam-bam and it is in the oven and you are cleaning up the mixing bowls.  You can speed the start up by using a salsa mix, instead of chopping the tomato and onion, but I have never found shredded pepperjack, which would really be nice.  (You can dice the pepperjack all at once and keep it in the freezer with the other cheeses.  Take out what you want, add the gorgonzola and blue crumbles, and let the whole thaw while you fix everything else.)


The salt, for which Matzos Brie is famous, comes from the blue cheese and gorgonzola cheese.  So you do not have to add salt, even when using unsalted matzo.  I would not serve this to someone who had been placed on a low-salt diet.  I have never tried to determine how much salt is in the final product, but I scarf it down faster than French fries, so I think it is a lot more than I usually have in a dinner entrĂ©e.


Edited and revised -March 12, 2010

Posted in Good Things in Life | No Comments »

The pitfalls of Net Neutrality

November 4th, 2009 by

The pitfalls of Net Neutrality in a Christian country with mostly Christian legislators and legislatures


Idols and craven images in the modern world



The Sins of our Forefathers Bear Bitter Fruit


Net Neutrality seems like such a simple feature to preserve in the infrastructure of a constitutionally free country like the United States of America.  However, we do have to remember that the country was founded by Puritans and a puritanical streak a mile wide sweeps down through the ages and colors every law or policy that is created by our government.  It is built into our laws, like the death penalty; blue laws about what commerce can happen on the Sabbath; laws about who can marry whom and who cannot marry; and laws that interdict medical procedures that violate current perceptions of Biblical prohibitions (abortions, death with dignity, and the provision of even information about birth control and family planning).  Another area of long standing Puritanical suppression in this country is the suppression of specific sexual practices and the control of publication of images of the body or those sexual practices.  And it is specifically this control of publication of images of the body or those sexual practices that collides with the notion of net neutrality.



Setting the Stage


Kugel has introduced a marvelous image gallery and display application that goes under the name of gauginweb.  This includes the Galleries and the Gaugin App and the downloadable Gaugin 3 picture management application.  All this is currently free and, when you set up your gallery, you get 1 Gig space free for your images.  I have currently documented our garden and flower development cycle from frost to frost, and have some bird pictures and still lifes in my gallery.  However, one soon tires of looking at the pictures one has produced.  In response to a Smithsonian Magazine article about the Cahaba Lilly and river of the same name, I entered Cahaba Lilly as the search term in the search box, and got a marvelous slideshow about the rafting the Cahaba river to see the lilies.  I went on to view slideshows of meadow larks (Did you know that there is a Peruvian meadow lark with a red breast and no V?), bobolinks, ravens, meerkats, tapers, gnu’s, wildebeasts, lemurs, and okapi.  Sadly, chipmunks did not appear, so one can be disappointed.  The search term “Flowers that bloom in the spring” produces a long series, and was initially headed by one of my own pictures.  Now, it is only 8th in the series.  It seems that one is limited only by one’s ability to dream up search terms that capture the collective name for objects, animals, and plants.  “Autumn Leaves” led me to one of my favorites: http://gauginweb.kugel.com/PatCrosby/AutumnLeavesExtravaganzaCatskillMountainsNY#5253732166178708242
But there is more to the Gauginweb gallery navigation.  Once you find an image you like, you can click on the owner’s icon in the right pane and open up their gallery and see what albums them have in addition to the picture you have discovered.  Further, there may be a list of galleries, to which the owner has established links, and you can navigate to them and see what they contain.  So, a search of some bird brought up an image by Michelle St.Sauveur, whose album “Best of the Best” (http://gauginweb.kugel.com/michellelynnsts/BestOfTheBest# ) is truly stunning, and she has links to other naturalists who do equally fine work.  And, if you are looking for whimsy, then this album is for you: http://gauginweb.kugel.com/yarving/JvhcND# .
The only problem with Gaugin navigation is that, once you have traversed the galleries to a point where there are no more linked galleries, you can’t get back to the first one so that you can try a different leg.  For completeness, I include my list of great galleries here:


Goodness and light links:


http://gauginweb.kugel.com/yarving
     http://gauginweb.kugel.com/yarving/JvhcND#
     http://gauginweb.kugel.com/yarving/Beauty#
http://gauginweb.kugel.com/lovecoffeeonly
     http://gauginweb.kugel.com/lovecoffeeonly/oEeDQF#
     http://gauginweb.kugel.com/lovecoffeeonly/Pictures#
          http://gauginweb.kugel.com/lovecoffeeonly/Pictures#5289900700506646882
http://gauginweb.kugel.com/mikheilmurvanidze
     http://gauginweb.kugel.com/mikheilmurvanidze/Hawaii#
http://gauginweb.kugel.com/michellelynnsts
     http://gauginweb.kugel.com/michellelynnsts/BestOfTheBest#
http://gauginweb.kugel.com/PatCrosby
     http://gauginweb.kugel.com/PatCrosby/AutumnLeavesExtravaganzaCatskillMountainsNY#
          http://gauginweb.kugel.com/PatCrosby/AutumnLeavesExtravaganzaCatskillMountainsNY#5253732166178708242
http://gauginweb.kugel.com/Xihuibin/DaysOfAutumn#
http://gauginweb.kugel.com/laurie.lotusbeam
     http://gauginweb.kugel.com/laurie.lotusbeam/AppleLaneGardens


 I think of these as the goodness and light of the gaugin web world and will refer to it hereafter as the “Baby”.


The Dark Side of the Gaugin Web World


One sort of stumbles into the Dark Side of GWW.  Having lived in California, I did a search on Redondo Beach, but the images there were mostly of empty beaches, people seemingly far off, and images of the main drag through the beach front.  Boring.  So then I thought about Muscle Beach in Santa Monica.  But that search showed images of empty beach, a building with a façade like a barbell, outdoor exercise areas, and 98-pound weaklings making strange poses with crooked arms.  Again boring.  So I tried “muscle men” as a search term.  That produced, in addition to ordinary men in strange poses, images of men with advanced upper body development, and mostly by three photographers—Chris, Jim, and See-ming Lee.  These proved to be galleries of a large number of albums with hundreds of images in each album.  They were all clothed, though many were in skimpy bathing suits, or underwear, and many were pulled down partially exposing pubic hair, or displaying erections under the garment.  They were all suitable for inclusion in the many print magazines that one can find in newspaper and magazine shops.  These collections are huge—well beyond the 1 gigabyte that Kugel provides free.  Ergo, they were advertizing; but it was unclear how they directed the viewers to the paying sites to generate a revenue stream.  Then I started noticing URLs imbedded in the pictures, and the album owner often included URLs in captions, or other information areas on the album page.  The following is a comment I found in one album:


“If you like my pictures, shop at Amazon from this link and let me earn a small commision:
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/redirect-home/derekrocom-20
Or, browse my personal website for more hot deals:
http://www.DerekRosen.com 
Also, add my blog to your Favorites
http://meboilover.blogospere.com/


But these images, while suggestive, were no smoking guns, and I started looking for them.  First, I looked at the tail end of the image set produced by the muscle men search term.  (The supposedly contains 7783 images, but I was never able to get gaugin web to show me anything past the 1000th entry. At page 6, images from muscleaeron started showing up.  These were images of professionals in the body building contests.  The first image of frontal male nudity, unobscured, now shows up at position 386, and there are two or three more by the 550th image.  These are certainly the smoking guns that will set off Christian calls for censorship in America.  But they were all from muscleaeron, who is clearly a European photographer and does not have the same restrictions and taboos as American photographers.  Turns out, the best search term, that restricts the chaff somewhat, is “nude muscle men”.  But the most efficient way to find these images is to open the gallery at: http://gauginweb.kugel.com/lord.aeron1234


Looking for American smoking guns, I walked the navigation tree, beginning with Chris and Jim.  Eventually, I found this gallery: http://gauginweb.kugel.com/jbukermsp which had an album entitled Cock and Cum Shots, which would have sent any adolescent into a tight fetal curl of inadequacy.  And I found http://gauginweb.kugel.com/rskepek , which contained an album of images of boots for “Working Women”.  In the middle of the images of boots, were images of sex acts between various numbers of men and a woman.  These images were probably out-takes form a XXX magazine or video, but were surprising to see outside the backroom of video shops and adult magazine shops.  However, these images are not in the public albums of that site any longer.  There was a point when all my smoking guns disappeared, but they slowly came back.  I thought that Kugel had enforced their niceness rules, but muscleaeron came back, and so did the above site; but the Cock and Cum Shots album has never reappeared, and the XXX images were removed from the boot album.  They eventually appeared for a short time in an second album, but have since disappeared.


A final smoking gun that I found is this image: http://gauginweb.kugel.com/meboilover/SexyHotShirtlessGuys15#5373369195693380802 .  It shows two youngish teens kissing.  This is guaranteed to push the Christian The-gays-are-recruiting-our-young-boys button, even though it should be noted that the two teens in question are roughly the same age, are not being recruited by older men (at least in the image), and no crime is being committed, except against (Christian, Jewish, Islamic) humanity.


Not all of the Christian Dark Side is evil.  This image of nude seated man, if done in paint on canvas, could grace the walls of any great museum. (http://gauginweb.kugel.com/lord.aeron1234/MuscleExploration#5228836826936607762  )  And this image of a nude on a beach is such a great composition that you don’t notice that the guy has an erection. (http://gauginweb.kugel.com/lord.aeron1234/MuscleExploration02#5363850280094932258 ) And if you still think “A kiss is just a kiss” that occurs as Time Goes By, you should have seen the YewTrunk video at the bottom of Muscleaeron’s blog.  Alas, and this emphasizes the transitory nature of things in the Gaugin Web World, it was replaced by other material.  A search for “The Kiss” on YewTrunk produced such a long list of search results, you would never find it that way.  (I found it using the search term “bear male kiss” and its URL is http://www.yewtrunk.com/watch?v=s07gu3eYZgw ).


The commando site (http://gauginweb.kugel.com/commandodubey ) is probably evil, and, possibly, a terrorist recruitment site.  The kugel standards people seem not to have noticed.


All of this stuff in the Dark Side of the Gaugin Web World will be referred to as “the bath water”, which Christian censorship forces would surely want to toss out.  However, the materials I have seen are no different from those that have been allowed in the print and video media.  The primary difference is that, currently, anyone, of whatever age, can find them.  Much of the Bath Water content would only be available in back rooms available only to people over 21, or perhaps 18 in Texas.  Kugel, in its Terms of Service, asserts that anyone with a Kugel account has stated that they are able to make a contract with Kugel and that implies meeting all existing age limits.  But, I did not generally log into a Kugel account when I searched these galleries.  Kugel may have a cookie on my system that gives them that information, but in leu of a specific statement from Kugel, I have my doubts.  The Baby is the cover that hides or keeps our eyes from seeing the bath water.  However, it is the bath water that pays for the whole facility.  People will not pay for viewing images of flowers but they will for the images in the bath water.  And Kugel will make its fortune on transmitting those images.  This bath water is still in the public view, but we have no knowledge, and access, to what is in the private galleries in the Gaugin Web World.  However, Kugel has created a mechanism by which a gallery owner can allow others to access their private galleries.  And that is where illegal images will be traded.



The Dark Side URLs


http://gauginweb.kugel.com/philippecomps01    no public albums after cleanup
http://gauginweb.kugel.com/rskepek   cleaned out porn after cleanup
http://gauginweb.kugel.com/commandodubey   commando recruitment?
http://gauginweb.kugel.com/jbukermsp   removed cock and cumshots album during cleanup
http://gauginweb.kugel.com/lord.aeron1234    musclearon
http://gauginweb.kugel.com/WorkoutInspirations
http://gauginweb.kugel.com/meboilover
http://gauginweb.kugel.com/hjonez2
http://gauginweb.kugel.com/VarArtistsComps01
http://gauginweb.kugel.com/VarArtistsComps02
http://gauginweb.kugel.com/Huhawted2 Ted’s Gallery
http://gauginweb.kugel.com/JoeyBoy9TN
http://gauginweb.kugel.com/DCPIGBOY
http://gauginweb.kugel.com/WantABoyScout
http://gauginweb.kugel.com/dmtrmgns1
http://gauginweb.kugel.com/fcukjck
http://gauginweb.kugel.com/kennw2008
http://gauginweb.kugel.com/r2.leonino
http://gauginweb.kugel.com/RednSilver01
http://gauginweb.kugel.com/TexasFratBoy
http://gauginweb.kugel.com/mundo.sanchez



Singles:
http://gauginweb.kugel.com/meboilover/SexyHotShirtlessGuys14#5373367968633823794
http://gauginweb.kugel.com/meboilover/SexyHotShirtlessGuys15#5373369195693380802 2 teens
http://gauginweb.kugel.com/lord.aeron1234/MuscleExploration#5228836826936607762 seated man
http://gauginweb.kugel.com/WorkoutInspirations/Unknown#5276927648276722786 sand dune
http://gauginweb.kugel.com/lord.aeron1234/MuscleExploration02#5363850280094932258   beach
http://gauginweb.kugel.com/lord.aeron1234/MuscleExploration02#5363563147905644274
http://gauginweb.kugel.com/lord.aeron1234/MuscleExploration02#5292741033918475778
http://gauginweb.kugel.com/Huhawted2/PtintJune1#5357125811143971618 man on couch
http://gauginweb.kugel.com/r2.leonino/Love#5392044702186840834 Towel rack
http://gauginweb.kugel.com/mundo.sanchez/PICTURETHIS#5203141816087423842 Picture this



What has all this to do with Net Neutrality?


Kugel wants Net Neutrality to justify its assertion that it is just transmitting 0’s and 1’s and censorship should not be imposed at the transmitter level.  An image isn’t an image until an end-user application turns the 0’s and 1’s into pixels. On the other hand, it is assuming that its users of the Gaugin Web World are all adults and is letting any user access to its community image galleries, not to mention blogs and sites for which there is little or no oversight, unless complaints are filed.  That stance is right up there with food advertisers saying that they are policing the advertising of sugary cereals to children, while maintaining ads inside children’s social networking sites, interactive game sites, and product placements.  The predictable result is the pandemic increase of obesity in children and the long term health effects of future generations of kids.  The health costs of these victims will be right up there with the costs of victims of asbestos, and the food industry, like the asbestos industry, is denying all effect and responsibility because nobody is forcing the children to eat the sugary cereals.


Kugel has begun setting up mechanisms by which users can grant collaborative access to “friends” to contribute to and maintain galleries.  If this will apply to private galleries, as well as public, then you have the basic network available for exchange of child pornography, while avoiding the necessity of having the images stored on local computers.  Current laws make possession of child pornography on local computers illegal, and when the police suspect possession, they get warrants to search the personal computers for such images.  If such images are actually stored in the web cloud, and are regularly wiped from the temporary web files immediately after using, then the police lose the proof for which they search. Inevitably, censorship and oversight will move out to the cloud providers, like Kugel and Huhaw, at which point the baby will get tossed out with the bath water.

Posted in Uncategorized | No Comments »

My nomination for Best Ever reframing of an Economics subject

December 7th, 2008 by

http://www.heraldnet.com/article/20081207/BIZ/712079944#Along.with.a.financial.mess..fix.we.need.to.understand


By James McCusker


Corporations are not real persons, of course. That would be silly. They are different from the rest of us in one very particular and important way: They are immortal. In that sense, they are more like vampires than people.

Posted in dotP | No Comments »

Need Help Diagnosing Spam Source

October 11th, 2008 by

From: “Richard K”
Subject: Need Help Diagnosing Spam Source
Date: Fri, 3 Oct 2008 10:17:57 -0400
Newsgroups: microsoft.public.windows.server.sbs


SBS 2003 Std. server (call him Company1) with Windows XP clients
Trend Micro WFBS  on network


I have been working on an issue with spam mail that is causing RBL issues.
At first I was thinking it was a virus somewhere in the network either using
Company1 Exchange as the sourcing to send these spam mails or the XP client
himself was sending port 25 traffic.  Now I’m thinking I may have an open
relay where some outside source is using the Company1 Exchange to send the
mails.  I have found an example which helps explain my thoughts.


1.  I look in the Company1 Exchange MTS for any messages I see for a period
of time.  I see TONS of messages which tells me it is the Company1 Exchange
box sending the messages and not some rougue XP client
2.  I started receiving some more spam to my email address in my office SBS
(Company2) These messages were intended for an email address at Company1
that I have a forward on to my server at Company2
3.  I have found a specific message that is in the Company1 MTS AND that I
received via the forward so I can match up that the email did originate from
the Company1 SBS server.
4.  When I look at the details of the message in the Company1 MTS the
“Sender” is not anyone on the network (“
dolore-’riclite@palpilot.com.tw“)
5.  I have attached the Internet Headers of this message that I get in my
Outlook.  This message was not caught by the AV.


Q1 – How are these messages getting into the Exchange queue of the Comany1
SBS?  From an client machine or am I missing some type of authentication
and/or have a relay open and something is using the Company1 Exchange server
as its engine?
Q2 – What do I need to do to make sure only valid users on the Company1
network may send emails via the Company1 Exchange and that I don’t have any
relay issues?


Thanks!


-Richard K


 



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From: dolore <
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Subject: Warning
To: <
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**************************************


From: “Lanwench [MVP - Exchange]“
Date: Fri, 3 Oct 2008 11:11:04 -0400


Richard K wrote:
> SBS 2003 Std. server (call him Company1) with Windows XP clients
> Trend Micro WFBS  on network
>
> I have been working on an issue with spam mail that is causing RBL
> issues.


What do you mean by RBL issues?


> At first I was thinking it was a virus somewhere in the
> network either using Company1 Exchange as the sourcing to send these
> spam mails or the XP client himself was sending port 25 traffic.


You can block your clients from accessing the Internet on anything besides
80 & 443. That’s not a bad plan in general….do this in ISA or your
perimeter firewall.


>   Now
> I’m thinking I may have an open relay where some outside source is
> using the Company1 Exchange to send the mails.


Unlikely, unless you specifically enabled that. Exchange does not permit
open relay out of the box. It permits authenticated relay, which I generally
disable unless absolutely necessary – but if you have a good password policy
you shouldn’t worry about that overmuch. .


>  I have found an
> example which helps explain my thoughts.
> 1.  I look in the Company1 Exchange MTS for any messages I see for a
> period of time.  I see TONS of messages which tells me it is the
> Company1 Exchange box sending the messages and not some rougue XP
> client


Well, it’s sending *messages* – including NDRs to spammers who tried to send
*you* their junk. This doesn’t demonstrate spammers are relaying through
your server.


> 2.  I started receiving some more spam to my email address in my
> office SBS (Company2) These messages were intended for an email
> address at Company1 that I have a forward on to my server at Company2


OK – not sure what that demonstrates.


> 3.  I have found a specific message that is in the Company1 MTS AND
> that I received via the forward so I can match up that the email did
> originate from the Company1 SBS server.


Well – you demonstrated that it was mail sent to your address at
company1 -not that it *originated* there. Did you look at the headers?


> 4.  When I look at the details of the message in the Company1 MTS the
> “Sender” is not anyone on the network
> (
dolore-’riclite@palpilot.com.tw)


Right. Because the sender is a spammer. The spammer sent mail *to* you – not
*through* you.


> 5.  I have attached the Internet Headers of this message that I get
> in my Outlook.  This message was not caught by the AV.


Sure, why would it be, unless it had a virus-laden or otherwise bad
attachment?
>
> Q1 – How are these messages getting into the Exchange queue of the
> Comany1 SBS?  From an client machine or am I missing some type of
> authentication and/or have a relay open and something is using the
> Company1 Exchange server as its engine?


You’re just getting spam. You aren’t creating it.


> Q2 – What do I need to do to make sure only valid users on the
> Company1 network may send emails via the Company1 Exchange and that I
> don’t have any relay issues?


Look in your virtual SMTP server properties, relay settings. But it’s that
way now, I promise, unless you deliberately changed it.


See http://www.msexchange.org/tutorials/MF005.html for a good overview of
relaying and spam.
>
> Thanks!


**************************************


From: “Richard K”
Date: Fri, 3 Oct 2008 11:58:56 -0400


RBL issues – The external IP address (151.196.94.114) is listed in various
RBLs include CBL and Spamhaus.  We thought we have cleaned the network of
any issues (according to the latest TM WFBS reports we are clean) but then
the IP gets put back on the RBL again as a spam sourcer.  This is the
primary reason for this thread along with some other thread questions I have
had.  I am having trouble identify the culprit.


This is SBS 2003 std so no ISA.  The SBS has a dual nic set up and the XP
clients must go through the server to get outside.


I looked at your link on possible relays and I believe you are correct about
the relay in the case.  All appears set up correctly


I see your point about the NDRs now and it makes sense.  In the example I
included (internet header) as I read it:  it is coming from
dolore-’riclite@palpilot.com.tw” being sent to
postmaster@fergusontrenching.com”  The “postmaster” address is just another
SMTP address attached to the administrator account.  That same administrator
account has a forward set up to my email address (
rkokoski@foxdtechllc.com),
hence that is how I ultimately get the spam.


Bottom line Lanwrench… I’m just trying to figure out how the IP address is
consistently reappearing on the RBL lists and I’m kind of stuck.  This
server is also being bombarded with incoming spam mail and I am looking at
options to have email first “cleaned” to cut down on the amount of incoming
spam mail that may reach the server for it to then have to process in some
form.


Thanks for any assistance and guidance!


-Richard K


**************************************


From: “Lanwench [MVP - Exchange]“
Date: Fri, 3 Oct 2008 12:30:19 -0400


Richard K <rkokoski@foxdtechllc.com> wrote:
> RBL issues – The external IP address (151.196.94.114) is listed in
> various RBLs include CBL and Spamhaus.


Ah, you mean you’ve been blacklisted. The blacklisting should explain why.
Do you send out a lot of mass mailings?


What antivirus/workstation security software do you run?


>  We thought we have cleaned
> the network of any issues (according to the latest TM WFBS reports we
> are clean) but then the IP gets put back on the RBL again as a spam
> sourcer.  This is the primary reason for this thread along with some
> other thread questions I have had.  I am having trouble identify the
> culprit.
> This is SBS 2003 std so no ISA.  The SBS has a dual nic set up and
> the XP clients must go through the server to get outside.


Do you use a good perimeter firewall appliance? I don’t like the two-NIC
setup unless you’ve got Premium and use ISA. Multihomed DCs cause problems.
Your setup isn’t as secure as it ought to be, either, unless you’ve got a
good firewall.


>
> I looked at your link on possible relays and I believe you are
> correct about the relay in the case.  All appears set up correctly
>
> I see your point about the NDRs now and it makes sense.  In the
> example I included (internet header) as I read it:  it is coming from
> “
dolore-’riclite@palpilot.com.tw” being sent to
> “
postmaster@fergusontrenching.com”  The “postmaster” address is just
> another SMTP address attached to the administrator account.  That
> same administrator account has a forward set up to my email address
> (
rkokoski@foxdtechllc.com), hence that is how I ultimately get the
> spam.
> Bottom line Lanwrench… I’m just trying to figure out how the IP
> address is consistently reappearing on the RBL lists and I’m kind of
> stuck.  This server is also being bombarded with incoming spam mail
> and I am looking at options to have email first “cleaned” to cut down
> on the amount of incoming spam mail that may reach the server for it
> to then have to process in some form.


Sure. I’d check out Postini or MailFoundry or MXLogic.


**************************************


From: RichardK
Date: Fri, 3 Oct 2008 10:28:01 -0700


We are using Trend Micro WFBS Advanced for server and XP workstions.  All are
up to date.  The blacklisting only indicates the IP (151.196.94.114) has been
a source of spam mails and not much else.  Maybe you can see something I
cannot see for that IP.


The dual nic set up is the standard setup I employ.  In this case it’s what
I inherited.  Between the external nic and the DSL there is a Netgear FVS318
appliance with limited incoming port openings (443, 4125, 3389, 25) but I
don’t see it with much more  capability.  I know you mentioned possibly one
of the XP clients opening it’s own port 25 and sending the spam.  Am I
assuming correctly this can even be done since it would have to go through
the dual nic SBS box?  In my scheme the FVS318 will only know the SBS
external NIC IP address since the XP clients are natted to a completely
different subnet off of the inside LAN nic.  Without the capability of the
FVS318 to limit outbound port traffic the only thing I came across is a step
by step on how to create and AD policy to shut down port 25 to all XP clients
since none of them should be using it.


I appreciate all of your input!!


-Richard K


**************************************


From: “Lanwench [MVP - Exchange]”
Date: Fri, 3 Oct 2008 13:42:57 -0400


Richard K wrote:
> We are using Trend Micro WFBS Advanced for server and XP workstions.


Have you run a full scan recently?


> All are up to date.  The blacklisting only indicates the IP
> (151.196.94.114) has been a source of spam mails and not much else.
> Maybe you can see something I cannot see for that IP.


I just did a lookup on dnsreport.com and it’s listed in several places.
>
> The dual nic set up is the standard setup I employ.  In this case
> it’s what I inherited.  Between the external nic and the DSL there is
> a Netgear FVS318 appliance with limited incoming port openings (443,
> 4125, 3389, 25) but I don’t see it with much more  capability.  I
> know you mentioned possibly one of the XP clients opening it’s own
> port 25 and sending the spam.  Am I assuming correctly this can even
> be done since it would have to go through the dual nic SBS box?


Yes.


>   In
> my scheme the FVS318 will only know the SBS external NIC IP address
> since the XP clients are natted to a completely different subnet off
> of the inside LAN nic.  Without the capability of the FVS318 to limit
> outbound port traffic


I think it can, but I don’t know how (haven’t used one of those for a
while). I’d get a better firewall appliance that can do this for you. Your
workstations shouldn’t need to access the Internet on anything other than 80
or 443 for most purposes.


>  the only thing I came across is a step by step
> on how to create and AD policy to shut down port 25 to all XP clients
> since none of them should be using it.


I wouldn’t do it this way.
>
> I appreciate all of your input!!


What about mass mailings? Does this client do a lot?


**************************************


From: RichardK
Date: Fri, 3 Oct 2008 11:32:14 -0700


I am running full scans every night until I get this problem solved.  Hence
the “clean” reports I get every morning.  I know it’s listed in several
places with CBL and spamhaus the ones I am really paying attention to.


the ports open are 25,44,3389, 4125 for all INCOMING traffic.  I cannot find
anywhere on that appliance to control outbound traffic ports.  I use 3389 to
RDP directly to the server and 4125 for RWW.  I have not applied the GP for
the port 25 shutdown but without the right hardware I’m limited in my options
right now.  This client does not do alot of mass mailings but indirectly I
think they are doing them with some bot causing the problems.  I just have
not found it yet.


**************************************


Date: Fri, 03 Oct 2008 19:35:35 +0100
From: stephen


Richard K wrote:
> We are using Trend Micro WFBS Advanced for server and XP workstions.  All are
> up to date.  The blacklisting only indicates the IP (151.196.94.114) has been
> a source of spam mails and not much else.  Maybe you can see something I
> cannot see for that IP.


You mentioned that you would like your mail pre-filtered. WFBS Advanced
allows you to set up the Trend Interscan Messaging Hosted Security
service which is a free malware scanning service. You can register for
the service at the Trend site. You basically change your MX to point to
their server and tell them your server’s IP. It’s a half-decent system,
but my major gripe is that they don’t permit messages > 10MB on the
basic, free service and silently discard them (no NDR to sender).



http://cbl.abuseat.org/lookup.cgi?ip=151.196.94.114&.submit=Lookup


says that you are infected with a spam bot. I would change that SBS to a
one nic and block and log port 25 at the firewall from everything bar
SBS. The cuprit workstation will soon be revealed from the logged denials.


Failing that, install a network monitoring tool on your server and
examine the internal nic traffic to find the rogue PC. Ethereal or the
Microsoft Network monitor will do the trick.


Also make sure you have recipient filtering in Exchange to stop you
sending backscatter.


Install and run a quick scan of MalwareBytes anti-malware on every
workstation. It will find a fix stuff that Trend doesn’t.



stephen


**************************************


From: RichardK
Date: Fri, 3 Oct 2008 11:59:01 -0700


I know about the TM WFBS service but I have not set it up yet and tested.  I
did not know about the 10MB limit but glad I found that out.  I’m surprise
their default action would not be to just send it on it’s way vs. reject with
no NDR. 


I do see in the netgear appliance where I can block specific outbound ports
based on LAN address.  I am thinking this obviosly won’t work with the dual
nic since the WAN and LANs are on the seperate subnets or can I (10.0.16.x
WAN and 10.0.0.x LAN).  I am thinking if I specify anything in the 10.0.0.x
range the router does not see that address since it’s natted.  Out of
curiousity…. I have always seen the preaching of using a dual nic model for
the SBS.  What’s with the single nic design “being better”?



Can you please explain more about “Also make sure you have recipient
filtering in Exchange to stop you sending backscatter.”  I’m not sure what
you are referring to here.


**************************************


From: “SteveB”
Date: Fri, 3 Oct 2008 12:20:17 -0700


There has always been a debate about dual NICs on SBS. I have always
preferred that along with ISA for my clients, but again others are adamantly
against that configuration. It now becomes a moot point with SBS 2008 (based
on Windows Server 2008) where you can no longer have dual NICs at all.


**************************************


Date: Fri, 03 Oct 2008 20:26:14 +0100
From: Stephen


Richard K wrote:
> I know about the TM WFBS service but I have not set it up yet and tested.  I
> did not know about the 10MB limit but glad I found that out.  I’m surprise
> their default action would not be to just send it on it’s way vs. reject with
> no NDR. 


I complained about that to Trend. It makes it unusable in my book. Shame
really, because it’s a decent system for the money! I personally use
MailScanner on an external server to prefilter my mail (and our clients).


>
> I do see in the netgear appliance where I can block specific outbound ports
> based on LAN address.  I am thinking this obviosly won’t work with the dual
> nic since the WAN and LANs are on the seperate subnets or can I (10.0.16.x
> WAN and 10.0.0.x LAN).  I am thinking if I specify anything in the 10.0.0.x
> range the router does not see that address since it’s natted.  Out of
> curiousity…. I have always seen the preaching of using a dual nic model for
> the SBS.  What’s with the single nic design “being better”?


Yes, I’m not sure if the Netgear does egress filtering. If not, it’s not
much of a firewall appliance. If you’re handy with Linux or BSD you can
set up your own firewall on an old PC with 2 nics, or install one of the
opensource firewall products on it. Personally, I use OpenBSD pf in
bridge mode so filter my traffic.


The problem with the dual nic setup is that your SBS box is performing
NAT for your workstations so your firewall sees all outbound traffic
with the SBS IP address. You can’t therefore block workstations at the
firewall. I’m not all that familar with the SBS RRAS firewall in the
standard dual nic setup, but you may be able to do something there.


> Can you please explain more about “Also make sure you have recipient
> filtering in Exchange to stop you sending backscatter.”  I’m not sure what
> you are referring to here.


If this is not on, then exchange accepts all mail and then sends an NDR
if the recipient address doesn’t exist on your server to the apparent
sender address, which can be forged.  This is backscatter and spammers
can exploit it to get your server to send out spammy NDRs to arbitrary
victim address. With recipient filtering on, a message to a non-existent
address is rejected at the SMTP stage so the responsibily for the NDR
lies with the sending server, not yours. There are 2 places to check
this setting in exchange: properties of message delivery in global
settings and in the smtp virtual server advanced IP settings.



stephen


**************************************


From: “Lanwench [MVP - Exchange]”
Date: Fri, 3 Oct 2008 15:21:58 -0400


Richard K  wrote:
> I know about the TM WFBS service but I have not set it up yet and
> tested.  I did not know about the 10MB limit but glad I found that
> out.  I’m surprise their default action would not be to just send it
> on it’s way vs. reject with no NDR.


Yep – agreed. I hadn’t known that either. I would check out MailFoundry. If
you have fewer than 10 addresses, they won’t charge for their hosted
service.
>
> I do see in the netgear appliance where I can block specific outbound
> ports based on LAN address.


You need to block all, allow some.


>  I am thinking this obviosly won’t work
> with the dual nic since the WAN and LANs are on the seperate subnets
> or can I (10.0.16.x WAN and 10.0.0.x LAN).  I am thinking if I
> specify anything in the 10.0.0.x range the router does not see that
> address since it’s natted.  Out of curiousity…. I have always seen
> the preaching of using a dual nic model for the SBS.  What’s with the
> single nic design “being better”?


Outside of SBSland a multhomed DC is a real no-no. It isn’t giving you much
in the way of security, and is making life more complex. It isn’t even
supported in SBS2008, to the best of my knowledge.
>
>
> Can you please explain more about “Also make sure you have recipient
> filtering in Exchange to stop you sending backscatter.”  I’m not sure
> what you are referring to here.


Enable recipient filtering in Exchange system Manager – filter on recipients
not in the directory, etc.


http://www.msexchange.org/tutorials/Sender-Recipient-Filtering.html



**************************************


From: “Gregg Hill”
Date: Sat, 4 Oct 2008 00:55:27 -0700


Richard,


Search MS knowledge base for “reverse ndr” attack, make sure you are
protected, including tarpitting, then read on.


Others have recommended blocking port 25 from workstations, and you already
have the tool for it…the WFBS client firewall.


Create a new group on the Security Settings tab (do NOT import settings),
call it Firewalled Workstations, enable the client firewall in advanced
mode, set it to High so inbound/outbound traffic is blocked except for the
exception list, then delete the exception for the SMTP port. Enable the
error message pop-up, add exceptions for normal network traffic (mine popped
errors and required exceptions for port 123 for the time service; 161 and
427 to a networked HP Laserjet 3055; 135 to my SBS; and oddly enough, port
137 that is already on the exception list; port 1025; ICMP protocol). I got
tired of seeing the popup while typing this message, so I just exempted the
range from 1000 to 65535. Yes, it’s overkill, but I was just testing it to
see if it would suit your needs.


To test it, go to a workstation and use Telnet on port 25 to an outside mail
server, for example, “telnet mail.microsoft.com 25″ (but preferably to one
you control).You should get the server’s mail greeting. Type “quit” to kill
the telnet session, then move that workstation into the new Firewalled
Workstations group. It only
takes about a minute or two for the workstation to get the new settings.
Retest with Telnet, and it should fail.


Now look at the reports on the server…oops, I cannot find firewall reports
on the server…but they are on the workstations. Move all the workstations
into that new group, then sit back and wait for someone to start yelling
that a firewall pop-up keeps showing. OK, not really, do this after hours.


Look for any popups related to port 25 (when mail clients are closed, in
case any users have POP accounts that send on port 25).


Gregg Hill



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Much ado about the separation of Church and State III

September 2nd, 2008 by

From The


Eat-Your-Heart-Out-Dorothy-Parker


Virtual Round Table


Bill of Rights
 
Amendment I: Freedom of speech, religion,
press, petition and assembly.

Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.


 


 

 

What if the first admendment had been written with one additional clause “or include any religious term in any law” so that the admendment would read:



Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or including any religious term in the law, or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.




What would be the consequences 200 odd years down the line?  For starters, there would not be a Chapter 26.04 RCW entitled Marriage.  It would have to be entitled something like Civil Union.  And, “26.04.080 Marriage certificate” would morph into something like 26.04.080  “Certificate of Civil Union”.
If the states had been issuing Certificates of Civil Union all this time, to everyone, would there have been such a hullabaloo over the inclusion of gay couples in the list of those who may form a civil union?  Would such an inclusion have made countless religious couples feel that their institution of marriage were threatened by such an inclusion?  I think not.  If we, as a nation, were accustomed to this level of separation between religion and state, this simple conjoining of religious and civil terms would not have been an item of compelling interest.  It makes me wonder if all this posturing has primarily been for the purpose of shaking down the religious and inflating the political budgets of their leaders.  Now that is a point to ponder—should the pastors and priests have political budgets?
Perhaps it is time to “civilize” our laws.  That should give the legislatures something to do besides denying civil rights to the classes of people that religious groups love to hate.



Posted using BlogJet


 

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Testing a coerced style

August 24th, 2008 by

This is a large type Heading


 


This is a large type subheading that extends beyond a single line and needs more space


 


Now we need to see what happened


 Alas, the editor throws in a /span tag before the following text.  I have to remove in using the HTML page.  Bummer.


 


Well, I guess that I can live with that. 


So the current css override just contains the blocks to change the background color of the page and the post.


body {
 font-size : 1.1em;
 font-family : Verdana, Geneva, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;
 margin : 0px;
background-color: #72d8fa;
}
.post {
 border: 1px solid #CCCCCC;
 border-bottom-width: 2px;
 border-right-width: 2px;
 padding: 4px;
 margin-bottom: 20px;
                    background-color : #eeeeb9;
}


The two BlogJet Autoreplace strings are <span style=”font-size: 28pt; color: #008080; line-height: 1.1em;”> and </span>


 

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Testing Styles in the CSS overrides

August 24th, 2008 by

This is a very long title with a large type that I want to see if I can effect with a special format.


 


This is a very long title with a large type that I want to see if I can effect with a special format which I must enter as autocomplete in BlogJet.


In case anyone wants to know, the current css override, which is having no affect on this post is:


body{
 font-size : 1.1em;
 font-family : Verdana, Geneva, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;
 margin : 0px;
background-color: #72d8fa;
}
.post
{
 border: 1px solid #CCCCCC;
 border-bottom-width: 2px;
 border-right-width: 2px;
 padding: 4px;
 margin-bottom: 20px;
                    background-color : #eeeeb9;
}


I need to add the following code before the line: <span style=”font-size: 28pt; color: #008080; line-height: 1.1em;”>  and  </span> after the line.  So two autocompletes.

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