Category Archives: 6587

Compiling .NET 1.1 Projects In Visual Studio 2008

After having put my .NET 1.1 application running on the .NET 2.0 runtime (^), I’m planning on migrating it to .NET 2.0, but not all at once.

Because I don’t want to have 2 solutions (one on Visual Studio 2003 for the .NET 1.1 assemblies and another on Visual Studio 2008 for the .NET 2.0 assemblies) I decide to try using MSBee and have only one Visual Studio 2008 solution.

MSBee has a CodePlex project. You can download it from there or from Microsoft Downloads. Because the build on Microsoft Downloads seemed to be the most stable one, that was the one I downloaded and installed. The package comes with a Word document that explains all that needs to be done.

Before you can install and use MSBee you’ll need to install the .NET 1.1 SDK.

Having everything installed, I just opened the Visual Studio 2003 solution in Visual Studio 2008 and let it convert the solution and projects (near 30).

After the conversion, for building the projects with the .NET 1.1 C# compiler, the project files need to be edited to add the override the default targets with the MSBee ones by adding the MSBee imports after the default imports for the language:

<Import Project="$(MSBuildBinPath)\Microsoft.CSharp.targets" />
<Import Project="$(MSBuildExtensionsPath)\MSBee\MSBuildExtras.FX1_1.CSharp.targets" />



Another change needed (for Visual Studio 2008 – I don’t know if it was needed for Visual Studio 2005) is the tools version. MSBee needs version 2.0. To change that you’ll have to change the ToolsVersion attribute of the project’s root element:



<Project DefaultTargets="Build" ToolsVersion="2.0" xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/developer/msbuild/2003">



MSBee likes has own idea about output paths and I had set up custom output paths on my project. There’s information about this on the documentation but I decided to simply comment that out of the $(MSBuildExtensionsPath)\MSBee\MSBuildExtras.FX1_1.Common.targets file:



<!-- Paulo
<Choose>
  <When Condition=" '$(BaseFX1_1OutputPath)' == '' ">
    <PropertyGroup>
      <OutputPath>bin\FX1_1\</OutputPath>
    </PropertyGroup>
  </When>
  <Otherwise>
    <PropertyGroup>
      <OutputPath>$(BaseFX1_1OutputPath)</OutputPath>
      <OutputPath Condition=" !HasTrailingSlash('$(OutputPath)') ">$(OutputPath)\</OutputPath>
    </PropertyGroup>
  </Otherwise>
</Choose>
-->

<!-- Paulo
<PropertyGroup>
  <BaseIntermediateOutputPath>obj\FX1_1\</BaseIntermediateOutputPath>
  <IntermediateOutputPath Condition=" '$(PlatformName)' == 'AnyCPU' ">$(BaseIntermediateOutputPath)$(Configuration)\</IntermediateOutputPath>
  <IntermediateOutputPath Condition=" '$(PlatformName)' != 'AnyCPU' ">$(BaseIntermediateOutputPath)$(PlatformName)\$(Configuration)\</IntermediateOutputPath>

  <OutputPath Condition=" '$(PlatformName)' == 'AnyCPU' ">$(OutputPath)$(Configuration)\</OutputPath>
  <OutputPath Condition=" '$(PlatformName)' != 'AnyCPU' ">$(OutputPath)$(PlatformName)\$(Configuration)\</OutputPath>
  
  <- Once OutputPath is determined, set OutDir to its value. ->
  <OutDir>$(OutputPath)</OutDir>
</PropertyGroup>
-->



This all seemed to work fine on my old Windows XP machine without any third party Visual Studio plug-ins, but when I tried it on my Windows Vista X64 machine, I came across some problems:



  • License Compiler

    Because I’m using Infragistics‘ controls, there’s a licences.licx file and the build will compile it. And that proved to be a problem.

    MSBee copies all the files it needs to the build process to a temporary folder, builds it in there and then copies the result to the output path.

    LC.exe seemed to never be able to find all the assemblies it needed. Searching seemed to me to be an old issue (even from the .NET 1.1 times) and the solution always pointed to not compile the license file. So, I commented that part out of the $(MSBuildExtensionsPath)\MSBee\MSBuildExtras.FX1_1.Common.targets file:

    <Target
        Name="CompileLicxFilesCondition="'@(_LicxFile)'!=''"
        DependsOnTargets="$(CompileLicxFilesDependsOn)"
        Inputs="$(MSBuildAllProjects);@(_LicxFile);@(ReferencePath);@(ReferenceDependencyPaths)"
        Outputs="$(IntermediateOutputPath)$(TargetFileName).licenses">
    
      <!--
      <LC
          Sources="@(_LicxFile)"
          LicenseTarget="$(TargetFileName)"
          OutputDirectory="$(IntermediateOutputPath)"
          OutputLicense="$(IntermediateOutputPath)$(TargetFileName).licenses"
          ReferencedAssemblies="@(ReferencePath);@(ReferenceDependencyPaths)"
          ToolPath="$(TargetFrameworkSDKDirectory)bin\">
    
        <Output TaskParameter="OutputLicense" ItemName="CompiledLicenseFile"/>
        <Output TaskParameter="OutputLicense" ItemName="FileWrites"/>
    
      </LC>
      -->
    </Target>
  • Resource Generator

    Although this worked fine on the command line, inside Visual Studio ResGen.exe would throw some error and needed to be closed.

    Looking at the Windows Application Log I found out this:

    Faulting application Resgen.exe, version 1.1.4322.573, time stamp 0x3e559b5f, faulting module MockWeaver.dll, version 0.0.0.0, time stamp 0x4adb072e, exception code 0xc0000005, fault offset 0x00018fac, process id 0x4a50, application start time 0x01ca53c14488a2fb.

    MockWeaver.dll belongs to Isolator and I just disable it when building inside Visual Studio. I was hoping to start using Isolator on this project, but, for now, I can’t.



I hope this can be of some help and, if you need more, you’ll probably find it at the MSBee’s CodePlex forum.



The bottom line is: You don’t need Visual Studio 2003!

Typemock Is Launching The ASP.NET Bundle – Get Free Licenses


Typemock is launching a new product for ASP.NET developers – the ASP.NET Bundle – and for the launch they are giving out FREE licenses to bloggers and their readers.


The ASP.NET Bundle is the ultimate ASP.NET unit testing solution, and offers both Typemock Isolator and Ivonna, the ASP.NET Isolator add-on, for a discounted price.


ASP.NET Bundle launch giveaway:
For the ASP.NET Bundle launch Typemock are giving away free licenses to bloggers and their readers.


How do I get the free license?


Are you a blogger, webmaster, or internet columnist? Get your free license by helping Typemock launch their new ASP.NET Bundle, the ultimate ASP.NET unit testing solution.


Post the text below on your blog (as is, with links) and tell them about it . If you are in the first 60 to mail us after posting, your license will be on its way!


If you have an ASP.NET dedicated blog, you’ll get a license automatically (even if more than 60 submit) during the first week of this announcement.


8 bloggers will also get an additional 2 licenses (each) to give away / raffle to their readers or friends.


A few simple requirements:


  1. You must own a website, blog space or internet column, older than 2 months, or get permission from the owner of such a site.
  2. Your post must include the text below (including the links) between *Begin* and *End*.

*Begin*


Unit Testing ASP.NET? ASP.NET unit testing has never been this easy.


Typemock is launching a new product for ASP.NET developers – the ASP.NET Bundle – and for the launch will be giving out FREE licenses to bloggers and their readers.


The ASP.NET Bundle is the ultimate ASP.NET unit testing solution, and offers both Typemock Isolator, a unit test tool and Ivonna, the Isolator add-on for ASP.NET unit testing, for a bargain price.


Typemock Isolator is a leading .NET unit testing tool (C# and VB.NET) for many ‘hard to test’ technologies such as SharePoint, ASP.NET, MVC, WCF, WPF, Silverlight and more. Note that for unit testing Silverlight there is an open source Isolator add-on called SilverUnit.


The first 60 bloggers who will blog this text in their blog and tell us about it, will get a Free Isolator ASP.NET Bundle license (Typemock Isolator + Ivonna). If you post this in an ASP.NET dedicated blog, you’ll get a license automatically (even if more than 60 submit) during the first week of this announcement.


Also 8 bloggers will get an additional 2 licenses (each) to give away to their readers / friends.


Go ahead, click the following link for more information on how to get your free license.


*End*


Once you post this in your site, just drop them a line at asp@typemock.com with your name and the post URL to get your free license.


Hurry up – this offer is limited to the first 60 bloggers, or to ASP.NET dedicated bloggers who will post this in the first week.


Make sure to follow their Blog, Site or Twitter for updates on this event.


Unit Test Today! Get Typemock Isolator!

Help Typemock Launch Its New Visual Basic .NET Friendly API And You Might Get A Free License


Typemock is announcing today a new version of Typemock Isolator (5.2).


One of the coolest features in the new version is the inclusion of a new VB .NET unit testing API. This ‘VB friendly’ API was designed and written in VB.NET, for VB.NET developers. It uses the strengths of the VB.NET language to allow easy and intuitive use of the isolation API, for easier unit tests on any piece of .NET code.


If you are you a blogger, webmaster, or internet columnist, you can get your free personal license by helping Typemock launch their new 5.2 version for Isolator – the best tool to unit test VB.NET applications.


Although this version is targeted to unit test VB.NET applications, C# applications with unit tests built using Visual Studio 2005 can also benefit from this API.


How can you get the free license?


Post the text below on your blog (as is, with links) and tell them about it . If you are in the first 25 to mail them after posting, your license will be on its way!


If you have a VB.NET dedicated blog, you’ll get a license automatically (even if more than 25 submit) during the first week of this announcement.


A few simple requirements:


  1. You must own a website, blog space or internet column, older than 2 months, or get permission from the owner of such a site.
  2. Your post must include the text below (including the links) between *Begin* and *End*.

_


*Begin*


Programming Visual Basic applications?


Typemock have released a new version of their unit testing tool, Typemock Isolator 5.2.
This version includes a new friendly VB.NET API which makes Isolator the best Isolation tool for unit testing A Visual Basic (VB) .NET application.


Isolator now allows unit testing in VB or C# for many ‘hard to test’ technologies such as SharePoint, ASP.NET MVC, partial support for Silverlight, WPF, LINQ, WF, Entity Framework, WCF unit testing and more.


Note that the first 25 bloggers who blog this text in their blog and tell us about it, will get a Free Full Isolator license (worth $139). If you post this in a VB.NET dedicated blog, you’ll get a license automatically (even if more than 25 submit) during the first week of this announcement.


Go ahead, click the following link for more information on how to get your free license.


_


*End*


Once you post this in your site, just drop them a line at vb@typemock.com with your name and the post URL to get your free license.


Hurry up – this offer is limited to the first 25 general bloggers, or to VB.NET dedicated bloggers who will post this in the first week.



Disclaimer: This is an offer from Typemock as announced at http://blog.typemock.com/2009/01/get-free-isolator-licnese-for-helping.html. I’m just a fan.

Improving Debugging And Testing Through Assertions

Reading through the The Typemock Insider blog, I came across this post from Gil Zilberfeld.

I myself tend to fall in Gil’s practice ("binary search" debugging), but I don’t think Kent Beck has the right solution.

Gil’s suggestion of using Isolator is tempting (I don’t miss an opportunity to use it), but still not my favorite one.

I prefer to use debug assertions. Debug assertions can be used when running a debug version of the application to pop-up assertion messages and when running unit tests to fail tests.

In order to use debug assertions in unit tests a “special” trace listener is needed to make the test fail when its Fail method is called.

public class UnitTestTraceListener : global::System.Diagnostics.DefaultTraceListener
{
     public UnitTestTraceListener() : base()
    {
        this.Name = "UnitTest";
        this.AssertUiEnabled = false;
    }

    public override void Fail(string message, string detailMessage)
    {
        Microsoft.VisualStudio.TestTools.UnitTesting.Assert.Fail("Debug.Assert Failed: " + message + " " + detailMessage);
    }
}



Now, all you need to do is register it.




Registering the trace listener can either be done in code:




System.Diagnostics.Trace.Listeners.Remove("Default");
System.Diagnostics.Trace.Listeners.Add(new UnitTestTraceListener());



or configuration:




<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8" ?>
<configuration>
  <system.diagnostics>
    <assert assertuienabled="false"/>
    <trace>
      <listeners>
        <clear/>
        <add name="UnitTest" type="UnitTestTraceListener"/>
      </listeners>
    </trace>
  </system.diagnostics>
</configuration>



And if I’m using Isolator I have the take in account the accesses made in the call to the Assert method. More fun to me.


Typemock Isolator 5.1 Released

This major version adds static method support and non-public method faking to the AAA API. Check out the release notes.

I don’t like the reflective approach to testing private methods.

With the new additions to the AAA API, testing this class:

public class MyClass
{
    public string Public()
    {
        return this.Private();
    }

    private string Private()
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }
}



can be done like this:




[TestMethod]
[Isolated]
public void PrivateTest()
{
    MyClass fake = Isolate.Fake.Instance<MyClass>();

    Isolate.WhenCalled(() => fake.Public()).CallOriginal();

    Isolate.NonPublic.WhenCalled(fake, "Private").WillReturn("FAKE");

    string fakePublic = fake.Public();

    Assert.AreEqual("FAKE", fakePublic);

    Isolate.Verify.WasCalledWithExactArguments(() => fake.Public());

    Isolate.Verify.NonPublic.WasCalled(fake, "Private");
}



I would like it better if it was like this:




[TestMethod]
[Isolated]
public void PrivateTest()
{
    MyClass fake = Isolate.Fake.Instance<MyClass>();

    MyClass_Accessor fakeAccessor = MyClass_Accessor.AttachShadow(fake);

    Isolate.WhenCalled(() => fakeAccessor.Private()).WillReturn("FAKE");

    Isolate.WhenCalled(() => fake.Public()).CallOriginal();

    string fakePublic = fake.Public();

    Assert.AreEqual("FAKE", fakePublic);

    Isolate.Verify.WasCalledWithExactArguments(() => fake.Public());

    Isolate.Verify.WasCalledWithExactArguments(() => fakeAccessor.Private());
}



Looks almost the same but there aren’t any method names in the test code.




They were able to do it for Natural Mocks. I’m sure they will eventually do it for AAA.

Faking Output Parameters With Typemock Isolator

Some time ago I was asked if it was possible to fake output parameters with Typemock Isolator.

It’s actually very easy using any of the APIs.

Given this class:

public class MyClass
{
    public bool MyMethod(string input, out int output1, out double output2)
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }
}




Using the new AAA API, it’s as clean as:



[TestMethod]
[Isolated]
public void TestMethodIsolated()
{
    MyClass target = Isolate.Fake.Instance<MyClass>();

    string input = "test value";
    int expectedOutput1 = 1;
    double expectedOutput2 = 2;

    Isolate.WhenCalled(() => target.MyMethod(input, out expectedOutput1, out expectedOutput2)).WillReturn(true);

    int output1;
    double output2;
    bool result = target.MyMethod(input, out output1, out output2);

    Assert.IsTrue(result);
    Assert.AreEqual<int>(expectedOutput1, output1);
    Assert.AreEqual<double>(expectedOutput2, output2);
}



Using Natural Mocks, it’s as easy as:




[TestMethod]
[VerifyMocks]
public void TestMethodNatural()
{
    MyClass target = RecorderManager.CreateMockedObject<MyClass>();

    string input = "test value";
    int expectedOutput1 = 1;
    double expectedOutput2 = 2;

    using (RecordExpectations recorder = RecorderManager.StartRecording())
    {
        recorder.ExpectAndReturn(target.MyMethod(input, out expectedOutput1, out expectedOutput2), true);
    }

    int output1;
    double output2;
    bool result = target.MyMethod(input, out output1, out output2);

    Assert.IsTrue(result);
    Assert.AreEqual<int>(expectedOutput1, output1);
    Assert.AreEqual<double>(expectedOutput2, output2);
}



It’s also possible using Reflective Mocks:




[TestMethod]
[VerifyMocks]
public void TestMethodReflective()
{
    MockObject<MyClass> targetMock = MockManager.MockObject<MyClass>();

    string input = "test value";
    int expectedOutput1 = 1;
    double expectedOutput2 = 2;

    targetMock.ExpectAndReturn(
        "MyMethod",
        new DynamicReturnValue(delegate(object[] parameters, object context)
            {
                parameters[1] = expectedOutput1;
                parameters[2] = expectedOutput2;
                return true;
            }));

    int output1;
    double output2;
    bool result = targetMock.Object.MyMethod(input, out output1, out output2);

    Assert.IsTrue(result);
    Assert.AreEqual<int>(expectedOutput1, output1);
    Assert.AreEqual<double>(expectedOutput2, output2);
}



All you have to do is choose which one you like most.


Typemock Isolator 5.0 Is Out With Its New AAA API

Typemock has released version 5.0 of its unit testing tool: Isolator. Check out the release notes.

This new version comes with a new API: Arrange Act Assert:

I’ll have to say that I liked Isolator better over Isolate.

Also new in this version is the inclusion of the help file in the installation package.

Isolator 4.3 Released!

Today Typemock released version 4.3 of Typemock Isolator. Download it from here.

What’s new?

  • Support for Ivonna. For those of you who develop ASP.Net applications, Ivonna is a great tool, built on top of Isolator’s platform, to simplify writing tests for ASP.NET.
  • Typemock.Integration.Packs namespace APIs added to support license management through Isolator, the way Ivonna does.
  • As announced when it was released, version 4.2 was the last version of Isolator to support .NET 1.1. Version 4.3 only supports the 2.0 runtime and its Visual Studio counterparts: VS2005 and VS2008.
  • For 64 bit machines, now there’s a single installer. (don’t forget to uninstall both previous 32 and 64 installers prior to installing 4.3.)
  • RecorderManager.GetMockOf(instanceRef) and MockManager.GetMockOf(instanceRef). To retrieve the mock controller object based on a reference to the instance. (more…).

Bug fixes:

  • Fixes to DLINQ support. LINQ Queries with data tables now work better, for example with GroupBy.
  • Static constructors in Natural Mocks are now invoked correctly.
  • A bug that caused an exception to be thrown when mocking interfaces ("Method XX in type IMyInterface has no matching overload that returns TypeMock.Mock+a) was fixed.
  • A bug that caused an exception to be thrown when the mocked object was overriding Equals was fixed.
  • A bug that caused failure in mocking explicit interface with the same name was fixed.
  • A bug occurring im multithreading scenarios in VerifyWithWait was fixed.
  • A bug that causes NullReferenceException to be thrown when using Auto Deploy was fixed.

See also:

Why Use Random Values For Unit Testing

On a previous post I introduced a library for generating random values for purposes of unit testing.

I received a few comments and questions on my blogs [^][^][^][^].

Simon says that he’d “generally want every instance of the test I run to be repeatable on *every* run” and he’d “inclined to use the data source functionality in VSTS Unit Tests”. I couldn’t agree more.

Hugo pointed me to Pex. Looks nice. I’ll have to take a deeper look at it.

Other commenters were worried that in the case of a test failing to pass they were unable to reproduce the conditions of the test and thus would be unable to understand why the test had failed. As I see it, all data used in a failed test should be in the test output (at least, the data that made the test fail). Being it predictable data or random data.

I guess that most of the comments “against” my idea were due to the fact that I didn’t explain it well. I’ll try to do a better job now.

I use these random values when the value itself is not important, what’s important is its uniqueness.

Imagine you have  Costumer class where it’s enough to tell that the costumer is the same in any two given instances if the costumer ID is the same. In order to test the comparison code, I don’t need any particular reproducible set of values. I just need them to be different or the same depending on the test.

Imagine I have some code that needs to access the database with the connection string in a specific connection string settings element. I don’t care what the connection string is because I won’t be really accessing the database (this is really easy to accomplish with Isolator).

I hope I’ve explained myself better this time.