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PowerShell Summit Europe 2014 – All videos available

All of the recordings from the recent PowerShell Summit in Amsterdam are now available through the PowerShell.org channel on youtube. The playlist for the Summit is https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLfeA8kIs7Coehjg9cB6foPjBojLHYQGb_

 

Thank you again to the speakers, and attendees, who made for a wonderful first Summit in Europe and more thanks to the people who donated to our appeal to raise funds for the recording equipment.

PowerShell Summit Europe 2014 – – videos from day 1

The videos from day 1 of the Powershell Summit Europe 2014 are now available on the PowerShell.org youtube channel. The European Summit playlist can be found at
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLfeA8kIs7Coehjg9cB6foPjBojLHYQGb_

 

Uploading of day 2 is in progress and I'll supply notification when complete

 

Enjoy.

PowerShell Summit Europe 2014 – – slides and code

All of the slides and demo code the speakers wanted to share are available for your enjoyment at http://1drv.ms/1vMWmtm

 

I'm currently uploading the videos which is a slow process.  I'll post when hat activity is completed.

PowerShell Summit Europe 2014 – – Wednesday afternoon

Tobias Weltner started the last part of the Summit with a session on AST – Abstract Syntax Tree - and the PowerShell parser.

You can access the tokens used by the parser for instance to create a variable inventory.

AST takes you beyond the parser tokens and enables to do wonderful things to your scripts such as applying code formatting standards and expanding alias to the full

cmdlet and parameter names.

 

The second session was delivered by Jeff Wouters – Securing Remoting.  How do you secure remoting across the Internet?  How do you authenticate users?

Jeff showed us the issues around credentials and how to manage authentication – especially how to manage passwords.

 

The third session was a Best Practice discussion lead by Don Jones.

Code – If you don’t understand it don’t run it

PowerShell gallery – trusting the code?  Who wrote it? Feedback on code. Code should have ratings.

Module storage – where and why?

What are your thoughts?

 

Jeffrey Snover closed the Summit with a look at Just Enough Admin – RBAC through PowerShell.

Admins are part of the attack surface.

Need to Incrementally reduce admin exposure

JEA controls admin actions through PowerShell constrained endpoints and proxy functions.

JEA toolkit available for download through DSC resource kit

Use DSC for endpoint configuration – makes it simpler and easier

Example – allow access to manage file system but not view contents of files

PowerShell Summit Europe 2014 – Wednesday morning

The last morning started with me covering OMI (WMI) and DSC on Linux. OMI can be set up but wed need more classes; DSC on Linux works in push mode and integrates very nicely with DSC for Windows.

 

The second session consisted of Lee Holmes and Jim Truher introducing the Await module which provides Expect type functionality for PowerShell.

They demonstrated using FTP through ISE; automating Vi and automating SSH.

I can think of lots of uses for this.

 

Final session of the morning was Bartosz Bielawski on dynamic parameters

Dynamic parameters only work in context – the provider context

After demonstrating using dynamic parameters Bartek then showed how to add dynamic parameters to your code – and the hoops you have to go through to get them to work

Quotes from the Summit

Two quotes that stuck in my mind for the future of IT:

 

DSC is last chance for click next admins”

 

If you can just click you’re not a professional

PowerShell Summit Europe – Tuesday afternoon

Mike Pfeiffer kicked off the afternoon talking about DSC in the AWS cloud.  Using DSC to bootstrap new machines and configuration scripts to complete configuration. This works in push mode but pull servers being experimented with.

 

Second session was Jim Truher, a founder member of the PowerShell team, talking about Testing Frameworks.

Testing frameworks are essential.  Pester is a an excellent test framework for Test Driven Development. Pester is extensible as its a script module.

 

Our third session was Mike Marin speaking about PowerShell, devops and Windows Azure.

 

The final session was Lee Holmes - What Goes Bump in the Night? – looking at auditing to see what PowerShell is doing on your system

Security boundaries – once attackers get access to your machine its not your machine. Post exploitation.

Compromising administrators – means need just enough admin – don’t give unfettered access

Event forwarding great for detecting intrusions.

Forwarding occurs over WSMAN

Two days down and more good stuff to come

PowerShell Summit Europe 2015

No not a typo. We, at PowerShell.org, will be repeating the European Summit next year. Location hasn’t been finalised but will be Northern Europe.  The Summit will occur at about the same time of year.  Look to PowerShell.org later in the year for more information. We are hoping to be able to put on a larger event though that has yet to be confirmed.

 

Your support is critical to determining the size of the event, and ensuring the future of the event.

 

Look forward to seeing you next year

PowerShell Summit Europe – Tuesday morning

After a very successful DSC hackathon on Monday evening we reconvened on Tuesday morning with Steve Murawski delivering his second session on DSC.

A brief discussion on devops lead into looking at DSC configurations:

  • Configuration names can’t be hyphenated
  • Circular dependencies are detected
  • Partial named configurations allow multiple configurations working against same machine

The morning’s second session was me talking about creating cmdlets from the CIM StdRegProv class using a CDXML approach.  The talk started with using a single method and demonstrated how to add validation, simplify parameter input by the use of enumerations and how CDXML modules are used within PowerShell.

 

Dan Harman closed the morning session by talking about classes written in PowerShell – this functionality was introduced in the September preview of WMF 5

You can already define a class and load it with Add-Type but you have to write the class in C# or another .NET language. Now you can write the class in PowerShell

Classes can have overloaded constructors and methods.  All class members are public by default.

Enums are possible. Scoping is lexical not dynamic as in PowerShell

PowerShell Summit Europe 2014–Monday afternoon

 

Mike Pfeiffer started the Monday afternoon session with a demonstration of using PowerShell to manage Amazon Web Services.

 

Dan Harman, from the PowerShell team, followed with PowerShell Repositories Unleashed. Oneget is a software package manager

Oneget has PowerShell cmdlets; a C# API and a WMI provider may follow. Originally released against a Chocolately provider – others will follow.  Dan showed a nuget provider being installed

PowerShellGet is overlays OneGet and provides the ability t0 install and manage PowerShell modules

Package providers aren’t trusted by default. You can configure repositories to be trusetd – especially useful if you create your own

 

The third session of the afternoon was supplied by Tobias Weltner on Sophisticated Techniques of Plain Text Parsing.

PowerShell is based on text but often need to work with unstructured text data.  He started with using –split and lead into using regular expressions.

Can force into CSV format by supplying headers

Experience based learning enables more sophisticated processing

Select-string can also be used to parse textual data

 

The final Monday session was Do custom objects dream about ETS? by  Bartosz Bielawski

Bartek showed how to create custom objects and set its type.  Once you have that done you can create formatting and type data to control how the data is displayed.