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Installing .Net 3.5 (and earlier) on Windows 8 and Windows 8.1

There are some older applications that require earlier versions of .NET than the version included and enabled by default on Windows 8 and Windows 8.1. Normally you can enable the .NET Framework 3.5 (which includes .NET 2.0 and .NET 3.0) as a Windows Feature. (Control Panel, Programs and Features, Turn Windows Features on or off.) But in some environments, especially those using SBS and WSUS, you may get an error message:

0x800f0906: “Windows couldn't connect to the Internet to download necessary files. Make sure that you're connected to the Internet, and click Retry to try again.”

This, of course, is totally bogus because the computer IS connected to the Internet, but save yourself some grief and do it from the command line in the first place. The files you need are part of the DVD (or USB stick or whatever) that you used to install Windows. Just insert that media and from an elevated command or PowerShell prompt type:

PSH> DISM /Online /Enable-Feature /FeatureName:NetFx3 /All /LimitAccess /Source:E:\Sources\SxS

Deployment Image Servicing and Management tool
Version: 6.3.9600.16384

Image Version: 6.3.9600.16384

Enabling feature(s)
[==========================100.0%==========================]
The operation completed successfully.

Where the E: drive in E:\Sources\SxS  is replaced by the drive letter of the DVD, USB or other media source or your Windows distribution media. Or, the pure PowerShell way:

PSH> Enable-WindowsOptionalFeature -Online -FeatureName "NetFx3" -All -LimitAccess -Source "E:\Sources\SxS"

Now, whatever application it is that needs this older version of the .NET Framework will be happy. (Zune 4.8, in my case.)

Updated: 13 November 2013: Added PSH equivalent.
:   2 June, 2014: Fixed curly quotes
:   13 October, 2014: Confirmed, the same command works in Windows 10 Preview

 

Office 365 Integration Module Beta

The beta of the Office 365 connector (officially known as the "Office 365 Integration Module") for Windows Small Business Server 2011 Essentials is now available. See the post on the Official SBS Blog. This is still only a beta, but is now widely available. I haven't heard any news about when we will finally have a released version of this connector.

Charlie.

Microsoft ITPro Satisfaction Survey

A couple of times a year, Microsoft sends out a satisfaction survey to ITPros. I have no idea how one does, or does not, end up on that list, but should you happen to get an email, I’d strongly suggest you take the time to fill it out. If you’re like me, you undoubtedly have a few issues you’d like to raise, and this can be a good way to do it. But you should also take the time to make sure you tell them what they’re doing right, not just what they’re doing wrong.

 

A few thoughts on things to think about as you’re filling out the survey:

1.) Help and support – how well do you think MS is doing? How easy is it to find the answers you need? And how useful are the support people when you really need help? What are some of the resources for answers? Here are a few:

One of the changes I’ve appreciated is the ease of getting hot fixes – either automated fix-its, or just the ability to download a hotfix without having to go through a bunch of rigmarole .

2.) Security – Here, I think MS is doing an excellent job. Are there things I would like? Yes – Forefront Endpoint Protection for my SBS Server. But meanwhile, Security Essentials for home and very small businesses, or Microsoft InTune for small to mid-sized businesses are both great solutions on the desktop. And IE9 is safer even than IE8, and I thought IE8 was a darn good browser.  Some security resources:

3.) Licensing – they keep telling us they’ve made it easier and simpler. Sorry, I’m not seeing it. I just spent 4 days in Las Vegas at SMBNation (good show for any one in the SMB space, by the way.) And the one thing I’m sure of is that people do NOT understand Microsoft licensing and they don’t much like it either. I’m annoyed no end that I can’t buy a copy of Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Essentials (WSSE) from HP or Dell or my favourite distributor to build my own. So far, there’s only one OEM of WSSE available in North America, and that’s from High Rely. But by all means, put MS to the test on their licensing claims. Try one of these resources, and let them know what you think:

4.) Training and Online Resources – OK, I think they are doing a pretty good job here. There are quite a few free or reasonably priced resources available for training, and TechNet has some excellent content. Even if you have to use a third-party search engine to find it sometimes.

For training, try: .  The Microsoft Virtual Academy

For eval versions to train with: Microsoft Eval Center

Is Windows XP Good Enough?

Check out the latest Springboard Virtual Roundtable on TechNet where several of us talk about why the move to Windows 7 in the enterprise makes sense and why Windows XP just isn’t good enough any more.

FWIW, I found the format interesting, and fun, and enjoyed the chance to contribute. Even managed to get a plug in for PowerShell.

 

New Theme

My personal thanks to Barb Bowman for the new theme I'm using now. Very much appreciated! What I especially like is that it gives me a reasonable font (Consolas) for code blocks.

Hello world!

Welcome to the my new blog. I'll keep the old one up and alive as long as Susan keeps the server up. There's still some useful 64-bit information there that folks can use. 

On this blog, however, we're going to focus on Windows and Windows Server topics, including Windows PowerShell, Windows deployment, Hyper-V, and Remote Desktop Services. And anything else I work on.

Right now I'm working on a blog post around PowerShell and Windows Server Backup. Stay tuned. (Though the initial work is up on the TechNet Wiki already at: http://social.technet.microsoft.com/wiki/contents/articles/windows-server-2008-r2-powershell-backup.aspx)

Charlie.