Android: Why Google’s cellphone software is making waves

What is Android?


Google’s Android is an operating system for mobile phones, similar to how Windows or Leopard are operating systems for PC and Macintosh computers. Android provides the base on which other software on the phone works. Design of the operating system was originally begun by Andy Rubin, a California-based technology entrepreneur who formed the company Android Inc., which Google bought in 2005. The search-engine company announced in November 2007 that it would enter the mobile phone market through Android.


http://www.cbc.ca/technology/story/2008/09/23/f-android-faq.html

Google needs to be more open, author of new book says

In a short 10 years, Google Inc. has become one of the most valuable companies in the world, and certainly the hottest commodity on the internet. Along the way, the company that started out as a simple search engine provider has expanded into other businesses — news, maps, e-mail, productivity software, as well as many others — and has revolutionized virtually every industry it has touched.


http://www.cbc.ca/technology/story/2008/09/26/tech-google.html

Goo-Hoo! faces EU anti-trust probe

The European Union’s Competition Commission is investigating the proposed search advertising tie-up between Google and Yahoo!.

“In mid-July, we decided to open a preliminary investigation on our own initiative into potential effects of the Google-Yahoo agreement on competition in the European Economic Area (EEA) market,” a spokesman for European Competition Commissioner Neelie Kroes has told Reuters.

Under the agreement, Google would serve ads onto Yahoo! search results pages in the US and Canada – not the EU. But we all know the pact would affect European advertisers.

Earlier today, the World Association of Newspapers (WAN) – an organization representing 18,000 papers across the globe – called on the EU (as well as the US Department of Justice and the Competition Bureau of Canada) to bury the proposed deal.

“First, many of our European members are active in North America and will be directly harmed by any anti-competitive conduct there,” the organization said in a letter to European Competition Director Cecilio Madero.

“Second, we believe the deal will result in reduced incentives for Yahoo to compete against Google even in Europe, as Yahoo reportedly expects to earn hundreds of millions annually under the agreement. Also, because Google and Yahoo together control over 95 per cent of advertisers’ search advertising spending in Europe, the two companies could easily set the conditions for competition in the EU if they chose to do so.”

The world was well aware that regulators in the US and Canada were probing the deal, but until news of WAN’s letter hit the web, sparking more than a few phone calls to the EU, the European investigation was on the down low. The EU spokesman said the probe had no deadline.

Google and Yahoo! reached their agreement as a means of fending off Steve Ballmer’s $44.6bn bid to swallow Jerry Yang and company. But a Goo-Hoo ad pact is surely more dangerous than a full-fledged Mircohoo. Even without a Yahoo! tie-up, Google controls 70 per cent of the North American search advertising market. ®


Justice Department signals challenge to Google-Yahoo deal

WASHINGTON – In a possible blow to Yahoo Inc.’s hopes for an advertising partnership with Google Inc., the Justice Department has hired an antitrust litigator to review evidence for what could become a legal challenge to the deal.


The Wall Street Journal reported Tuesday that the attorney is Sanford Litvack, a former vice chairman at Walt Disney Co. and chief of the Justice Department’s antitrust division during the Carter administration.


Litvack is reviewing evidence the department has gathered in what could become an antitrust case focused either on Google itself or on the search advertising partnership it announced with Yahoo in June, the Journal reported. That deal was part of Yahoo’s attempt to ward off a takeover attempt by Microsoft Corp.


A Justice Department spokeswoman declined to comment on the report.


But Yahoo said in an e-mailed statement, “We have been informed that the Justice Department, as they sometimes do, is seeking advice from an outside consultant, but that we should read nothing into that fact. We remain confident that the deal is lawful.”


Blair Levin, a regulatory analyst at Stifel Nicolaus, said in a note to clients that the hiring of an outside lawyer such as Litvack is a “rare” move by the department that likely indicates a legal challenge against a company or transaction.


“The stakes are … far higher for Yahoo,” Levin wrote, because Google has “already succeeded in keeping Yahoo out of the arms of Microsoft.”

The partnership between the two companies would allow Google to sell some of the ads displayed alongside search results on Yahoo’s website. Yahoo and Google have insisted the deal would benefit consumers and advertisers, but they have delayed it until early October to give the Justice Department time to review it.


“We are confident that the arrangement is beneficial to competition, but we are not going to discuss the details of the regulatory process,” Google spokesman Adam Kovacevich said in a statement.


Microsoft has strongly opposed the deal in testimony before Congress. A Microsoft spokesman declined to comment.


On Sunday, a group of major advertisers said they had written the Justice Department in opposition to the deal, arguing it would give Google and Yahoo control of 90 per cent of the online search advertising market. The group includes Coca-Cola Co., Procter & Gamble Co., and General Motors Corp.


Antitrust litigator looking at Yahoo-Google ad deal

In a possible blow to Yahoo Inc.’s hopes for an advertising partnership with Google Inc., the U.S. Justice Department has hired an antitrust litigator to review evidence for what could become a legal challenge to the deal.


The Wall Street Journal reported Tuesday that the attorney is Sanford Litvack, a former vice chairman at Walt Disney Co. and chief of the Justice Department’s antitrust division during the Carter administration.


Litvack is reviewing evidence the department has gathered in what could become an antitrust case focused either on Google itself or on the search advertising partnership it announced with Yahoo in June, the Journal reported. That deal was part of Yahoo’s attempt to ward off a takeover attempt by Microsoft Corp.


A Justice Department spokeswoman declined to comment on the report.


But Yahoo said in an e-mailed statement, “We have been informed that the Justice Department, as they sometimes do, is seeking advice from an outside consultant, but that we should read nothing into that fact. We remain confident that the deal is lawful.”


Blair Levin, a regulatory analyst at Stifel Nicolaus, said in a note to clients that the hiring of an outside lawyer such as Litvack is a “rare” move by the department that likely indicates a legal challenge against a company or transaction.


“The stakes are … far higher for Yahoo,” Levin wrote, because Google has “already succeeded in keeping Yahoo out of the arms of Microsoft.”


The partnership between the two companies would allow Google to sell some of the ads displayed alongside search results on Yahoo’s website. Yahoo and Google have insisted the deal would benefit consumers and advertisers, but they have delayed it until early October to give the Justice Department time to review it.


“We are confident that the arrangement is beneficial to competition, but we are not going to discuss the details of the regulatory process,” Google spokesman Adam Kovacevich said in a statement.


Microsoft has strongly opposed the deal in testimony before Congress. A Microsoft spokesman declined to comment.


On Sunday, a group of major advertisers said they had written the Justice Department in opposition to the deal, arguing it would give Google and Yahoo control of 90 per cent of the online search advertising market. The group includes Coca-Cola Co., Procter & Gamble Co., and General Motors Corp.