Got battery problems with Surface 3? There’s a fix!

If you have a Surface 3 and the battery doesn’t last long, there is a firmware fix available from MS.

Catastrophic Surface Pro 3 battery life finally has its firmware fix

Top tools for preventing data leaks

If you are a corporation and want to protect vital or legal documents like HIPAA data, here some examples of software that can help.

Top tools for preventing data leaks

Removal instructions for Get-a-Clip

What is Get-a-Clip?

The Malwarebytes research team has determined that Get-a-Clip is adware. These adware applications display advertisements not originating from the sites you are browsing.

https://forums.malwarebytes.org/topic/187642-removal-instructions-for-get-a-clip/

Optimising WMI calls–part 1

Recently saw some code where user was running this

$bootupMemory = gwmi -Query "SELECT * FROM Win32_OperatingSystem" -ComputerName $srv
$cpuLoad = gwmi -Query "SELECT * FROM Win32_Processor" -ComputerName $srv

$tSessions = gwmi -Query "SELECT * FROM Win32_TerminalService" -ComputerName $srv

$ima = gwmi -Query "SELECT * FROM Win32_Service WHERE name=’imaservice’" -ComputerName $srv
$mfcom = gwmi -Query "SELECT * FROM Win32_Service WHERE name=’mfcom’" -ComputerName $srv
$ctxPrintMgr = gwmi -Query "SELECT * FROM Win32_Service WHERE name=’cpsvc’" -ComputerName $srv
$msmqstatus = gwmi -Query "SELECT * FROM Win32_Service WHERE name=’msmq’" -ComputerName $srv

$cDrive = gwmi -Query "SELECT * FROM Win32_Logicaldisk WHERE deviceid=’c:’" -ComputerName $srv
$dDrive = gwmi -Query "SELECT * FROM Win32_Logicaldisk WHERE deviceid=’d:’" -ComputerName $srv

 

against 300 machines.  There were some more calls they involved WMI classes installed by Citrix which I don’t use in my lab

 

Question was why was it running slow

 

Two thoughts initially are that repeated calls to Get-WmiObject involve creating, using and removing DCOM connections. This assumes that DCOM isn’t blocked by a firewall or the network. Using a single CIM session should speed up the process.

 

Secondly making multiple calls to the same class is inefficient.

 

In addition using the WQL query involves more typing which makes things more difficult to maintain.

 

Last point is that everyone knows how much I love aliases so you won’t be surprised if I point out that using them is BAD

 

I don’t have 300 servers in my lab – though using nano server VMs on a machine with 64GB ram you could do that – so I used some PowerShell looping to get round that

Measure-Command -Expression {

$srvs = ‘W16TP5TGT01’, ‘W16TP5TGT02’

for ($i=1; $i -le 150; $i++){

foreach ($srv in $srvs) {
$bootupMemory = gwmi -Query "SELECT * FROM Win32_OperatingSystem" -ComputerName $srv
$cpuLoad = gwmi -Query "SELECT * FROM Win32_Processor" -ComputerName $srv

$tSessions = gwmi -Query "SELECT * FROM Win32_TerminalService" -ComputerName $srv

$ima = gwmi -Query "SELECT * FROM Win32_Service WHERE name=’imaservice’" -ComputerName $srv
$mfcom = gwmi -Query "SELECT * FROM Win32_Service WHERE name=’mfcom’" -ComputerName $srv
$ctxPrintMgr = gwmi -Query "SELECT * FROM Win32_Service WHERE name=’cpsvc’" -ComputerName $srv
$msmqstatus = gwmi -Query "SELECT * FROM Win32_Service WHERE name=’msmq’" -ComputerName $srv

$cDrive = gwmi -Query "SELECT * FROM Win32_Logicaldisk WHERE deviceid=’c:’" -ComputerName $srv
$dDrive = gwmi -Query "SELECT * FROM Win32_Logicaldisk WHERE deviceid=’d:’" -ComputerName $srv
}
}
}

Measure command will run the commands but it reports the time taken rather than the results

 

I have 2 servers and loop 150 times round connecting to them and getting the results

Some caching of connectivity information occurs but this is close enough

 

Days              : 0
Hours             : 0
Minutes           : 8
Seconds           : 59
Milliseconds      : 419
Ticks             : 5394194858
TotalDays         : 0.00624328108564815
TotalHours        : 0.149838746055556
TotalMinutes      : 8.99032476333333
TotalSeconds      : 539.4194858
TotalMilliseconds : 539419.4858

 

A time of just under 9 minutes isn’t bad. This is fast enough to run during the day and can definitely be run over night

 

But we should be able to do better than that

 

Lets use a CIM session instead of individual DCOM sessions

Measure-Command -Expression {

$srvs = ‘W16TP5TGT01’, ‘W16TP5TGT02’

for ($i=1; $i -le 150; $i++){

foreach ($srv in $srvs) {
$cs = New-CimSession -ComputerName $srv
$bootupMemory = Get-CimInstance -Query "SELECT * FROM Win32_OperatingSystem" -CimSession $cs
$cpuLoad = Get-CimInstance -Query "SELECT * FROM Win32_Processor" -CimSession $cs

$tSessions = Get-CimInstance -Query "SELECT * FROM Win32_TerminalService" -CimSession $cs

$ima = Get-CimInstance -Query "SELECT * FROM Win32_Service WHERE name=’imaservice’" -CimSession $cs
$mfcom = Get-CimInstance -Query "SELECT * FROM Win32_Service WHERE name=’mfcom’" -CimSession $cs
$ctxPrintMgr = Get-CimInstance -Query "SELECT * FROM Win32_Service WHERE name=’cpsvc’" -CimSession $cs
$msmqstatus = Get-CimInstance -Query "SELECT * FROM Win32_Service WHERE name=’msmq’" -CimSession $cs

$cDrive = Get-CimInstance -Query "SELECT * FROM Win32_Logicaldisk WHERE deviceid=’c:’" -CimSession $cs
$dDrive = Get-CimInstance -Query "SELECT * FROM Win32_Logicaldisk WHERE deviceid=’d:’" -CimSession $cs
Remove-CimSession -CimSession $cs
}
}
}

 

Time is now

Days              : 0
Hours             : 0
Minutes           : 8
Seconds           : 31
Milliseconds      : 839
Ticks             : 5118397269
TotalDays         : 0.00592407091319444
TotalHours        : 0.142177701916667
TotalMinutes      : 8.530662115
TotalSeconds      : 511.8397269
TotalMilliseconds : 511839.7269

 

That’s a 5% speed increase for minimal coding effort

 

Next step is to remove the redundant WMI calls which we’ll do in the next post

Installing and Configuring SharePoint Server 2013 on premise for Microsoft Azure

In case you are wondering this is completely different than the Quick and Dirty install video. This video goes through all of the steps to build a production grade install of SharePoint.

What? That seems really confusing. How do you do on-prem SharePoint 2013 on Azure? You use IaaS (Infrastructure as a Service) of course.

In this video, we start with nothing and build out all of the pieces to install SharePoint Server 2013. While the video shows it how to do everything in Azure you can adapt the steps to do an install inside your own network just as easy.

Domain Controller

  • We create a VM DC1 and set a static IP
  • We make changes to the Azure Virtual Network
  • We DCPromo the server and create a new Contoso.com domain
  • All of those steps and a lot more are covered in this video: Create a new Active Directory Forest in Azure https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_HmQO43vgNs

SQL Server 2014 SP2

  • We create a VM SQL1
  • We install SQL Server 2014 SP2 180-day trial
  • We set all of the security and settings to make SharePoint happy
  • All of those steps and more are covered in this video: Install SQL Server 2014 for SharePoint https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AXxMONuRN2E

SharePoint Server 2013 Install

  • We create a VM SP1
  • We install SharePoint Server 2013 RTM 180-day trial
  • We install Service Pack 1
  • We install June 2016 Cumulative Update
  • All of those steps and more are covered in this video: Install and Configure SharePoint Server 2013 on-prem using Microsoft Azure – Part 1 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rFElnN8vG20

SharePoint Server 2013 Configure

  • We use PowerShell to create our farm
  • We walk through the service accounts and least privileged security concepts
  • We create all of the service applications with database names without GUIDs
  • SharePoint is up and fully functional for you to use
  • All of those steps and more are covered in this video: Install and Configure SharePoint Server 2013 on prem using Microsoft Azure – Part 2 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-wOlCEm-H5w

That should do it. Walk through all of that content and you can have a SharePoint 2013 Server up and running in Azure. Pretty awesome!

For this video, there is also a premium guide available. The premium guide just documents all of the steps in an easy to following guide with numbered steps, bolded actions, and screenshots. Additionally, it includes automated PowerShell scripts that allow you to avoid all of the typing demonstrated in the video. Finally, there is a script and Excel file that will create the active directory accounts for you. It is preconfigured to create all of the accounts in the video but is easy to update to add additional accounts for testing or to change the names to meet your domain standards. For more information, check out http://www.boldzebras.com/youtube

Let me know what you think and if you have suggestions for future videos.

 Shane

 PS – I have the same thing available for SharePoint Server 2016 http://www.boldzebras.com/sharepoint-2016-on-prem

How to Sign in to Windows 10

By default, you need to dismiss the lock screen and enter your credentials to sign in to Windows 10 with your account.

This tutorial will show you how to sign in to Windows 10 with your user account.

Read more…

Unit Testing .NET Core

Introduction

With the recent arrival of .NET Core, some things that we were used to having are no longer available. This includes unit tests – plus Visual Studio integration – and mocking frameworks. Fortunately, they are now becoming available, even if, in some cases, in pre-release form.

In this post, I will cover:

  • Unit testing frameworks
  • Mocking libraries
  • Validation libraries

I won’t explore everything that exists, just present a simple setup that works well for .NET Core.

Unit Testing

So, you want to do unit testing? There are a couple of frameworks for that purpose that work with .NET Core, which include:

MS Test is Microsoft’s own unit testing library, I’d say a much hated one because of its historical tie to Visual Studio. This was the last one that was announced for .NET Core and it’s still not in release form.

They more or less work the same way, so let’s see how to use xUnit, my favorite one So, you need to add two Nuget packages:

  • xunit: this is the actual library that you will be using
  • dotnet-test-xunit: this is the runner and integration with Visual Studio

I sometimes have a base class for tests, which takes care of loading configuration and initializing stuff, but let’s leave that aside. A unit test class for xUnit looks like this:

using Xunit;

public class MyTests
{
[Fact]
public void Test()
{
}
}

Now, you need to configure the runner so that you can run tests in Visual Studio. Using project.json, it goes like this:

{
"version": "1.0.0-*",
"testRunner": "xunit",
"buildOptions": {
"emitEntryPoint": false,
"copyToOutput": ["appsettings.json"]
},

"dependencies": {
"dotnet-test-xunit": "2.2.0-preview2-build1029",
"Microsoft.Extensions.Configuration": "1.0.0",
"Microsoft.Extensions.Configuration.Json": "1.0.0",
"Microsoft.Extensions.PlatformAbstractions": "1.0.0",
"Microsoft.NETCore.App": {
"type": "platform",
"version": "1.0.0"
},
"xunit": "2.2.0-beta2-build3300"
},

"frameworks": {
"netcoreapp1.0": {
"imports": "dnxcore50"
}
}
}

Notice that I am copying to the output folder the appsettings.json file, I am not going to talk about it, but let’s just say that it has some configuration that my tests will use, and it needs to be on the same file as the unit tests assembly.

With the Visual Studio integration working, we get this:

image

So we can run and debug our tests directly from here. Nice to have coherent behavior for all unit test frameworks!

Mocking

As for mocking, there are also some mocking frameworks that work with .NET Core:

I’ll pick Moq for this exercise. Just add the Moq package to your project. Here’s how to do simple mocking of an interface:

using Xunit;
using Moq;

[Fact]
public void Test()
{
var mock = new Mock<IService>();
mock
.Setup(x => x.Get())
.Returns("Hi there!");

var svc = mock.Object;

var result = svc.Get();

Assert.NotNull(result);

Assert.Equal("Hi there!", result);
}

Exactly the same as you’d do in a classic .NET unit test using mocking.

Validation

As for validations, I know of two libraries that work with .NET Core:

I’ll pick FluentAssertions. Here’s a simple example, for the same test:

using FluentAssertions;
using Moq;
using Xunit;

[Fact]
public void Test()
{
var mock = new Mock<IService>();
mock
.Setup(x => x.Get())
.Returns("Hi there!");

var svc = mock.Object;

var result = svc.Get();

result
.Should()
.BeOfType<string>()
.And
.Be("Hi there!");
}

Again, this should be familiar to everyone.

Conclusion

So, it’s no longer unit tests holding us back from .NET Core! Most of what is done today in classic .NET can be done in Core by now. There are still some more complex libraries, for interception, mapping, serialization, etc, that are not quite there yet, but I expect these to come with time.

Removal instructions for Window Raws Manager

What is Window Raws Manager?

The Malwarebytes research team has determined that Window Raws Manager is adware. These adware applications display advertisements not originating from the sites you are browsing.
This one belongs to the WinRange family.

https://forums.malwarebytes.org/topic/187587-removal-instructions-for-window-raws-manager/

How to Change Picture Password for your Account in Windows 10

You can sign in to your PC with a picture password. You choose the picture and the three gestures you use with it to create a password that’s uniquely yours. When you have chose a picture, you “draw” with the mouse, touchpad, or pin/finger on a touchscreen to create a combination of circles, straight lines, and taps. The size, position, and direction of your gestures become part of your picture password.

When you change your picture password, you can keep your current picture and change your gestures, or choose a new picture.

This tutorial will show you how to change the picture password for your account in Windows 10.

Read more…

How to Remove a Picture Password from your Account in Windows 10

You can sign in to your PC with a picture password. You choose the picture and the three gestures you use with it to create a password that’s uniquely yours. When you have chose a picture, you “draw” with the mouse, touchpad, or pin/finger on a touchscreen to create a combination of circles, straight lines, and taps. The size, position, and direction of your gestures become part of your picture password.

This tutorial will show you how to remove a picture password from your account in Windows 10.

Read more…

How to Replay your Picture Password in Windows 10

You can sign in to your PC with a picture password. You choose the picture and the three gestures you use with it to create a password that’s uniquely yours. When you have chose a picture, you “draw” with the mouse, touchpad, or pin/finger on a touchscreen to create a combination of circles, straight lines, and taps. The size, position, and direction of your gestures become part of your picture password.

If you have forgotten your current set of gestures for your account’s picture password, then you can replay them to see them.

This tutorial will show you how to replay the picture password gestures for your account in Windows 10.

Read more…

How to Add a Picture Password to your Account in Windows 10

You can sign in to your PC with a picture password. You choose the picture and the three gestures you use with it to create a password that’s uniquely yours. When you have chose a picture, you “draw” with the mouse, touchpad, or pin/finger on a touchscreen to create a combination of circles, straight lines, and taps. The size, position, and direction of your gestures become part of your picture password.

This tutorial will show you how to add a picture password to your account in Windows 10.

Read more…

“Toymaster” has released Security Mailer Volume 16 #35

Security Mailer V16 #25

  • Apple rushes out security patches for iOS
  • Microsoft Office for Mac updates
  • Browser updates – Pale Moon for Linux
  • Cisco advisories including new patches related to NSA hack and Shadow Brokers
  • Open Source bulletin from HP for Perl and PHP, Linux 25th birthday, Linux Updates
  • Microsoft Security Bulletin revisions, Windows 10 updates and issues
  • General curity entries including US CERT bulletins
  • There is also information on VM Ware updates and the Microsoft PRO section has some important information.
  • During August I have also made a number of new additions to the Windows 10 resources so if you use Windows 10 be sure to take a look (look by date and you will find the new entries quite easily).

    Part 2 –

    1- JB – Article discussing the Shadow Brokers NSA leak from a different perspective that I happen to agree with completely as it coincides with my research on the issue and it led me to the same conclusions (another Snowden at the NSA)

    2- Leaked Exploits – from Mohit Kumar at The Hacker News, the leaked exploits from the Shadow Brokers are indeed legit and do belong to the NSA

How to Add or Remove Network Icon on Lock and Sign-in Screen in Windows 10

By default, users can click/tap on the Network icon on the sign-in screen to disconnect the PC from the network or connect the PC to other available networks without having to sign in to Windows.

This tutorial will show how to add or remove the Network icon on the lock and sign-in screens for all users in Windows 10.

Read more…

How to Add or Remove Lock in Account Picture Menu in Windows 10

Locking your PC protects it from unauthorized use when you need to step away from the PC, and don’t want to sign out or shut down. When you lock the computer, you will be taken to the lock screen by default to dismiss (unlock) and sign in when ready to continue where you left off. Other users can still sign in to their accounts from the sign-in screen.

This tutorial will show you how to add or remove Lock from the account picture menu on the Start menu for all users in Windows 10.

Read more…

VMware Security Advisories

VMware Identity Manager and vRealize Automation updates address multiple security issues

Use the Opera Web browser? Change password ASAP!

Opera urges sync password reset after breach

Got on with Git

In which I move my version control from ComponentSoftware’s CS-RCS Pro to Git while preserving commit history.

[If you don’t want the back story, click here for the instructions!]

OK, so having watched the video I linked to earlier, I thought I’d move some of my old projects to Git.

I picked one at random, and went looking for tools.

I’m hampered a little by the fact that all my old projects used ComponentSoftware’s “CS-RCS Pro”.

Why did you choose CS-RCS Pro?

A couple of really good reasons:

  • It works on Windows
  • It integrates moderately well with Visual Studio through the VSS functionality
  • It’s compatible with GNU RCS, which I had some familiarity with
  • It was free if you’re the only dev on your projects

But you know who doesn’t use CS-RCS Pro any more?

That’s right, ComponentSoftware.

It’s a dead platform, unsupported, unpatched, and belongs off my systems.

So why’s it still there?

One simple reason – if I move off the platform, I face the usual choice when migrating from one version control system to another:

  • Carry all my history, so that I can review earlier versions of the code (for instance, when someone says they’ve got a new bug that never happened in the old version, or when I find a reversion, or when there’s a fix needed in one area of the code tree that I know I already made in a different area and just need to copy)
  • Lose all the history by starting fresh with the working copy of the source code

The second option seems a bit of a waste to me.

OK, so yes, technically I could mix the two modes, by using CS-RCS Pro to browse the ancient history when I need to, and Git to browse recent history, after starting Git from a clean working folder. But I could see a couple of problems:

  • Of course the bug I’m looking through history for is going to be across the two source control packages
  • It would mean I still have CS-RCS Pro sitting around installed, unpatched and likely vulnerable, on one of my dev systems

So, really, I wanted to make sure that I could move my files, history and all.

What stopped you?

I really didn’t have a good way to do it.

Clearly, any version control system can be moved to any other version control system by the simple expedient of:

  • For each change X:
    • Set the system date to X’s date
    • Fetch the old source control’s files from X into the workspace
    • Commit changes to the new source control, with any comments from X
    • Next change

But, as you can imagine, that’s really long-winded and manual. That should be automatable.

In fact, given the shared APIs of VSS-compatible source control services, I’m truly surprised that nobody has yet written a tool to do basically this task. I’d get on it myself, but I have other things to do. Maybe someone will write a “VSS2Git” or “VSS2VSS” toolkit to do just this.

There is a format for creating a single-file copy of a Git repository, which Git can process using the command “git fast-import”. So all I have to find is a tool that goes from a CS-RCS repository to the fast-import file format.

Nobody uses CS-RCS Pro

So, clearly there’s no tool to go from CS-RCS Pro to Git. There’s a tool to go from CS-RCS Pro to CVS, or there was, but that was on the now-defunct CS-RCS web site.

But… Remember I said that it’s compatible with GNU RCS.

And there’s scripts to go from GNU RCS to Git.

What you waiting for? Do it!

OK, so the script for this is written in Ruby, and as I read it, there seemed to be a few things that made it look like it might be for Linux only.

I really wasn’t interested in making a Linux VM (easy though that may be) just so I could convert my data.

So why are you writing this?

Everything changed with the arrival of the recent Windows 10 Anniversary Update, because along with it came a new component.

bashonubu

Bash on Ubuntu on Windows.

It’s like a Linux VM, without needing a VM, without having to install Linux, and it works really well.

With this, I could get all the tools I needed – GNU RCS, in case I needed it; Ruby; Git command line – and then I could try this out for myself.

Of course, I wouldn’t be publishing this if it wasn’t somewhat successful. But there are some caveats, OK?

Here’s the caveats

I’ve tried this a few times, on ONE of my own projects. This isn’t robustly tested, so if something goes all wrong, please by all means share, and people who are interested (maybe me) will probably offer suggestions, some of them useful. I’m not remotely warrantying this or suggesting it’s perfect. It may wipe your development history out of your one and only copy of version control… so don’t do it on your one and only copy. Make a backup first.

GNU RCS likes to store files in one of two places – either in the same directory as the working files, but with a “,v” pseudo-extension added to the filename, or in a sub-directory off each working folder, called “RCS” and with the same “,v” extension on the files. If you did either of these things, there’s no surprises. But…

CS-RCS Pro doesn’t do this. It has a separate RCS Repository Root. I put mine in C:RCS, but you may have yours somewhere else. Underneath that RCS Repository Root is a full tree of the drives you’ve used CS-RCS to store (without the “:”), and a tree under that. I really hope you didn’t embed anything too deep, because that might bode ill.

Initially, this seemed like a bad thing, but because you don’t actually need the working files for this task, you can pretend that the RCS Repository is actually your working space.

Maybe this is obvious, but it took me a moment of thinking to decide I didn’t have to move files into RCS sub-folders of my working directories.

Make this a “flag day”. After you do this conversion, never use CS-RCS Pro again. It was good, and it did the job, and it’s now buried in the garden next to Old Yeller. Do not sprinkle the zombification water on that hallowed ground to revive it.

This also means you MUST check in all your code before converting, because checking it in afterwards will be … difficult.

Enough already, how do we do this?

Assumption: You have Windows 10.

  1. Install Windows 10 Anniversary Update – this is really easy, it’s an update, you’ve probably been offered it already, and you may even have installed it. This is how you’ll know you have it:
    capture20160826194922505
  2. Install Bash on Ubuntu on Windows – everyone else has written an article on how to do this, so here’s a link (I was going to link to the PC World article, but the full-page ad that popped up and obscured the screen, without letting me click the “no thanks” button persuaded me otherwise).
  3. Run the following commands in the bash shell:
    sudo apt-get update
    sudo apt-get install git
    sudo apt-get install ruby
  4. [Optional] Run “sudo apt-get instal rcs”, if you want to use the GNU RCS toolset to play with your original source control tree. Not sure I’d recommend doing too much of that.
  5. Change directory in the bash shell to a new, blank workspace folder you can afford to mess around in.
  6. Now a long bash command, but this really simply downloads the file containing rcs-fast-export:
    curl http://git.oblomov.eu/rcs-fast-export/blob_plain/c8a2bd6edbb21c1bfaf269ad1ec0e82af72c911a:/rcs-fast-export.rb -o rcs-fast-export.rb
  7. Make it executable with the command “chmod +x rcs-fast-export.rb”
  8. Git uses email addresses, rather than owner names, and it insists on them having angle brackets. If your username in CS-RCS Pro was “bob”, and your email address is “kate@example.com”, create an authors file with a bash command like this:
    echo “bob=Kate Smith <kate@example.com>” > AuthorsFile
  9. Now do the actual creation of the file to be imported, with this bash command:
    ./rcs-fast-export.rb -A AuthorsFile /mnt/c/RCS/…path-to-project… > project-name.gitexport
    [Note a couple of things here – starting with “./”, because that isn’t automatically in the PATH in Linux. Your Windows files are logically mounted in drives under /mnt, so C:RCS is in /mnt/c/RCS. Case is important. Your “…path-to-project…” probably starts with “c/”, so that’s going to look like “/mnt/c/RCS/c/…” which might look awkward, but is correct. Use TAB-completion on folder names to help you.]
  10. Read the errors and correct any interesting ones.
  11. Now import the file into Git. We’re going to initialise a Git repository in the “.git” folder under the current folder, import the file, reset the head, and finally checkout all the files into the “master” branch under the current directory “.”. These are the bash commands to do this:
    git init
    git fast-import < project-name.gitexport
    git reset
    git checkout master .
  12. Profit!
  13. If you’re using Visual Studio and want to connect to this Git repository, remember that your Linux home directory sits under “%userprofile%appdatalocallxsshome”

This might look like a lot of instructions, but I mostly just wanted to be clear. This is really quick work. If you screw up after the “git init” command, simply “rm –rf .git” to remove the new repository.

Haven’t changed your Dropbox password since 2012? Naughty,…Naughty… 🙁   Better do it now!

Dropbox prompts certain users to change their passwords

Office for Mac Updates (Critical)

Security Update for Microsoft Office (3177451)

Reason for Revision: V2.0 (August 22, 2016): Bulletin revised to
announce the availability of the 14.6.7 update for Microsoft
Office for Mac 2011 (3179162) and the 15.25 update for Microsoft
Office 2016 for Mac (3179163). Customers running affected Mac
software should install the appropriate update for their product
to be protected from the vulnerabilities discussed in this
bulletin.

– Originally posted: August 9, 2016
– Updated: August 22, 2016
– Bulletin Severity Rating: Critical
– Version: 2.0

Recent Comments

Archives