Angular 2: Filtering a List Using a Computed Property and ngModelChanged

In my Pluralsight course: “Angular 2: Getting Started”, I demonstrate how to filter a list of products for display using a custom pipe. However, using a custom pipe does not provide easy access to the filtered result. For example, say you also want the count of the filtered list so you can display “5 of 125” or access other information about the list. In these cases, it is best to filter without using a custom pipe. This post shows you one technique: using a computed property and the ngModelChanged event.

Additional techniques for solving this problem are:

This post updates the code available from my github repo. So starting with that code:

1. Change the declarations adding a productsFiltered computed property. The productsFiltered property will contain the filtered list of products.

pageTitle: string = ‘Product List’;
imageWidth: number = 50;
imageMargin: number = 2;
showImage: boolean = false;
listFilter: string;
errorMessage: string;
products: IProduct[];
productsFiltered: IProduct[];

2. Add an onFilterChanged event handler that executes each time the filter input box is changed:

onFilterChanged(filter: any) { 
    this.listFilter = filter;
    filter = filter ? filter.toLocaleLowerCase() : null;
    this.productsFiltered = filter ? this.products.filter((product: IProduct) =>
        product.productName.toLocaleLowerCase().indexOf(filter) !== -1) : this.products;
}

This code sets the listFilter property and re-filters the list every time the listFilter input box changes. (Recall that we’ve removed the two-way binding, so we need to manually set the listFilter property.)

This is not enough, however. When the page is first displayed the product array is empty so nothing appears on the page. We need to initialize the computed property when the product data is retrieved.

3. One way to set the computed property when the data is retrieved is to modify the ngOnInit() method as follows:

ngOnInit(): void {
       this._productService.getProducts()
                 .subscribe(
                   products => this.onProductsRetrieved(products),
                   error =>  this.errorMessage = <any>error);
}

When the products are retrieved, this code calls the onProductsRetrieved method.

4. Create the new onProductsRetrieved method as follows:

onProductsRetrieved(products: IProduct[]) {
     this.products = products;
    this.productsFiltered = products;

}

This code sets the retrieved products to our product property and initializes our computed property.

5. The only other changes are to the template:

<input type=’text’ (ngModelChange)=’onFilterChanged($event)’ [ngModel]=’listFilter’ />

This separates the two-way binding into its one-way property binding with the [ngModel] and the one-way event binding with (ngModelChange). Whenever the model changes, the onFilterChanged method is called.

6. And change the template binding:

<tr *ngFor=’let product of productsFiltered‘>

This now binds to the productsFiltered property and no longer needs the pipe. We can then also bind other elements to this property or this property’s count method as needed.

Enjoy!

How to Downgrade from Windows 10 Enterprise to Windows 10 Pro

Starting with Windows 10 Insider Preview Build 14352, deploying Windows Enterprise edition gets easier.

Prior to Windows 10, the upgrade from the Pro to Enterprise edition required a complete wipe and reinstallation (clean install) of the OS. In Windows 10, Microsoft enabled bit-less edition upgrade from Pro to Enterprise. This means all the features are on the device already and the upgrade to Enterprise edition can be performed by changing the product key rather than having to download and deploy a new image. However, doing this required a reboot to complete. Microsoft heard a lot of feedback about having to reboot to complete the upgrade so starting with build 14352, a reboot is no longer required when upgrading from the Pro to Enterprise edition.

Luckily, it’s just as easy to downgrade from Windows 10 Enterprise back to Windows 10 Pro.

This tutorial will show you how to quickly and directly downgrade from Windows 10 Enterprise to Windows 10 Pro without losing anything, having to clean install, or restart the computer.

Read more…

Angular 2: Filtering a List Using a Computed Property and Events

In my Pluralsight course: “Angular 2: Getting Started”, I demonstrate how to filter a list of products for display using a custom pipe. However, using a custom pipe does not provide easy access to the filtered result. For example, say you also want the count of the filtered list so you can display “5 of 125” or access other information about the list. In these cases, it is best to filter without using a custom pipe. This post shows you one technique: using a computed property and the input event.

Additional techniques for solving this problem are:

This post updates the code available from my github repo. So starting with that code:

1. Change the declarations adding a productsFiltered computed property. The productsFiltered property will contain the filtered list of products.

pageTitle: string = ‘Product List’;
imageWidth: number = 50;
imageMargin: number = 2;
showImage: boolean = false;
listFilter: string;
errorMessage: string;
products: IProduct[];
productsFiltered: IProduct[];

2. Add an onFilterChanged event handler that executes each time the filter input box is changed:

onFilterChanged(event: any) {
    let filter = event.target.value;
    filter = filter ? filter.toLocaleLowerCase() : null;
    this.productsFiltered = filter ? this.products.filter((product: IProduct) =>
        product.productName.toLocaleLowerCase().indexOf(filter) !== -1) : this.products;
}

This code re-filters the list every time the listFilter input box changes.

This is not enough, however. When the page is first displayed the product array is empty so nothing appears on the page. We need to initialize the computed property when the product data is retrieved.

3. One way to set the computed property when the data is retrieved is to modify the ngOnInit() method as follows:

ngOnInit(): void {
       this._productService.getProducts()
                 .subscribe(
                   products => this.onProductsRetrieved(products),
                   error =>  this.errorMessage = <any>error);
}

When the products are retrieved, this code calls the onProductsRetrieved method.

4. Create the new onProductsRetrieved method as follows:

onProductsRetrieved(products: IProduct[]) {
     this.products = products;
    this.productsFiltered = products;

}

This code sets the retrieved products to our product property and initializes our computed property.

5. The only other changes are to the template:

<input type=’text’ (input)=’onFilterChanged($event)’ [(ngModel)]=’listFilter’ />

This binds the input event to the onFilterChanged event handler, passing in the event information.

NOTE: The input event is not supported in all browsers.

6. And change the template binding:

<tr *ngFor=’let product of productsFiltered‘>

This now binds to the productsFiltered property and no longer needs the pipe. We can then also bind other elements to this property or this property’s count method as needed.

Enjoy!

Angular 2: Filtering a List Using a Computed Property and Setter

In my Pluralsight course: “Angular 2: Getting Started”, I demonstrate how to filter a list using a custom pipe. However, using a custom pipe does not provide easy access to the filtered result. For example, say you also want the count of the filtered list so you can display “5 of 125” or access other information about the list. In these cases, it is best to filter without using a custom pipe. This post shows you one technique: using a computed property and a setter.

Additional techniques for solving this problem are:

This post updates the code available from my github repo. So starting with that code:

1. Change the declarations making the listFilter a private property and adding a productsFiltered computed property. The productsFiltered property will contain the filtered list of products.

pageTitle: string = ‘Product List’;
imageWidth: number = 50;
imageMargin: number = 2;
showImage: boolean = false;
private _listFilter: string;
errorMessage: string;
products: IProduct[];
productsFiltered: IProduct[];

2. Add a property getter and setter for the listFilter property as follows:

get listFilter(): string {
    return this._listFilter;
}

set listFilter(filter: string) {

    this._listFilter = filter;
    filter = filter ? filter.toLocaleLowerCase() : null;
    this.productsFiltered = filter ? this.products.filter((product: IProduct) =>
        product.productName.toLocaleLowerCase().indexOf(filter) !== -1) : this.products;
}

The getter returns the private variable and is used by the template bindings to display the entered filter string. The setter sets the private variable and re-filters the list every time the listFilter property changes.

This is not enough, however. When the page is first displayed the product array is empty. So this code returns an empty collection and nothing appears on the page. We need something to reset this filter when the product data is retrieved.

3. One way to set the listFilter when the data is retrieved is to modify the ngOnInit() method as follows:

ngOnInit(): void {
       this._productService.getProducts()
                 .subscribe(
                   products => this.onProductsRetrieved(products),
                   error =>  this.errorMessage = <any>error);
}

When the products are retrieved, this code calls the onProductsRetrieved method.

4. Create the new onProductsRetrieved method as follows:

onProductsRetrieved(products: IProduct[]) {
    this.products = products;
    this.listFilter = ”;
}

This code sets the retrieved products to our product property and then sets listFilter to an empty string so that our set procedure is executed and our data is displayed.

5. The only other change is to the template:

<tr *ngFor=’let product of productsFiltered‘>

This binds to the productsFiltered property and no longer needs the pipe. We can then also bind other elements to this property or this property’s count method as needed.

Enjoy!

Powershell – Discovery of DLL load vulnerability that can bypass AV and UAC controls

There are probably only limited opportunities to infect in corporate environment.  But it has potential to be a front-end for an exploit kit in bypassing AV & UAC controls.  If successful it can setup up its own “malware ADMIN” account.  Subsequently, other malware could flow  to potentially infect further, including even corporate ransomware (which is a growing trend).

There are some compensating controls for user to be in ADMIN group, plus to do some “clicking” along the way.  However, many developers who constantly install software are setup in the ADMIN group.  Often users are as well.  This is a beneficial finding in terms of security research for strengthening security within a powerful capability 

http://cn33liz.blogspot.co.uk/2016/05/bypassing-amsi-using-powershell-5-dll.html

Bypassing Amsi using PowerShell 5 DLL Hijacking — While doing some research on the inner workings of Microsofts new Antimalware Scan Interface technology within Windows 10, i found a DLL loading vulnerabilty within PowerShell 5. The reason i did some research is because some offensive PowerShell scripts i use within my own Red Teaming tool called p0wnedShell are getting blocked by Windows Defender on Windows 10 “despite of running from memory”, so i wanted to know if it was possible to bypass this technology.

So with these findings, we can conclude that PowerShell 5 is vulnerable for dll hijacking and we can control code execution when copied to a location where we have write access.  With this knowledge we could now use PowerShell to run custom code like backdoors, keyloggers, malware e.d. within a Windows 10 system.  Now when a local admin user runs PowerShell.exe from a command prompt, and clicked Yes on the UAC prompt, a new admin user is added to the local administrator group within the system.

You think your systems are old?? Check these out!!

When you look at some of the systems you have to work with, you can get the idea that you are behind the curve. At the hospice I support we are finally in the process of replacing out Windows 2000 server domain.

I thought we were bad until i read this. This is our government in action (or lack thereof).

Not dead yet: 7 of the oldest federal IT systems still wheezing away

Removal instructions for SweetPacks Mahjong

What is SweetPacks Mahjong?

The Malwarebytes research team has determined that SweetPacks Mahjong is adware. These adware applications display advertisements not originating from the sites you are browsing.

https://forums.malwarebytes.org/topic/183662-removal-instructions-for-sweetpacks-mahjong/

How to Upgrade from Windows 10 Pro to Windows 10 Enterprise

Starting with Windows 10 Insider Preview Build 14352, deploying Windows Enterprise edition gets easier.

Prior to Windows 10, the upgrade from the Pro to Enterprise edition required a complete wipe and reinstallation (clean install) of the OS. In Windows 10, Microsoft enabled bit-less edition upgrade from Pro to Enterprise. This means all the features are on the device already and the upgrade to Enterprise edition can be performed by changing the product key rather than having to download and deploy a new image. However, doing this required a reboot to complete. Microsoft heard a lot of feedback about having to reboot to complete the upgrade so starting with this build a reboot is no longer required when upgrading from the Pro to Enterprise edition.

This tutorial will show you how to quickly and directly upgrade from Windows 10 Pro to Windows 10 Enterprise without having to clean install or restart the computer.

Read more…

How to Turn On or Off Windows 10 Limited Periodic Scanning with Windows Defender

Starting with Windows 10 Insider Preview Build 14352, a new security setting called Limited Periodic Scanning will be included.

Limited Periodic Scanning is a new security setting you can choose to turn on if you use an antivirus program other than Windows Defender. This setting can provide an additional line of defense in scanning and detecting malware on your device. Each month Microsoft’s Malicious Software Removal Tool detects malware on 1 to 2 million devices, even those running other antivirus software. The Limited Periodic Scanning setting can be turned on for unmanaged devices.

When turned on, Windows 10 will use the Windows Defender scanning engine to periodically scan your PC for threats and remediate them. These periodic scans will utilize Automatic Maintenance—to ensure the system chooses optimal times based on minimal impact to the user, PC performance, and energy efficiency—or customers can schedule these scans. Limited Periodic Scanning is intended to offer an additional line of defense to your existing antivirus program’s real-time protection.

This tutorial will show you how to turn on or off Limited Periodic Scanning if you use an antivirus program other than Windows Defender in Windows 10.

Read more…

Maîtrisez Windows 10 en moins de 10 minutes !

Bonjour à tous,

Vous venez d’installer Windows 10 ou vous en avez l’intention et vous désirez tout savoir…

Suivez le guide Winking smilehttp://www.tomsguide.fr/article/maitriser-windows-10,2-1722.html?CR_CC=200645278

Bonne soirée.
Patrice.

DHCP scope

After rebuilding my test machine for Server 2016 (with mixed results) I needed to add a DHCP scope to the environment. I blogged about the DHCP PowerShell module several years ago.

 

To quickly add a DHCP scope to the current server

Add-DhcpServerv4Scope -Name ‘Manticore Scope’  `
-StartRange 10.10.54.2 -EndRange 10.10.54.30 `
-Description ‘Scope for Manticore domain’ `
-Type DHCP -State Active -SubnetMask 255.255.255.0 `
-LeaseDuration (New-TimeSpan -Days 2)

 

Set-DhcpServerv4OptionValue  -ScopeId 10.10.54.0 -DnsServer 10.10.54.201

 

I’ll save this as I’ll have to rebuild the machine when Windows 2016 RTM’s and possibly again if I can’t get the wireless adapter to work then.

How to Hide or Unhide Your Apps in Store My Library List in Windows 10

The Store app in Windows 10 has a My Library feature that shows you all of the apps, games, music, and movies & TV that you installed on all devices while signed in with your Microsoft account. My Library in the Store makes it easy to quickly download and install an app or game owned by a Microsoft account to any account (local or Microsoft) on any Windows 10 PC or device.

Starting with Windows 10 Insider Preview Build 14342, there’s an update available for the Store app that now allows you to hide and unhide your apps listed in “My Library”.

This tutorial will show you how to hide and unhide your apps from showing in the My Library list by default in the Store app for your account in Windows 10.

Read more…

Windows server 2016 TP 5 activation

Having finished the current round of conference speaking I needed to upgrade my system to Windows 2016 TP5. I’m using a 6 year old Lenovo W510 system.

 

First problem is that I couldn’t get the wireless adapter working – after a lot of searching I saw a post with a similar issue due to the Wireless LAN Service which you need doesn’t install correctly. Server Manager and Get-WindowsFeature both show it as installed but the wlansvc service isn’t available – doesn’t show in in the services GUI or through Get-Service.

 

Telephone activation is a pain but works BUT if an internet activation fails you don’t get the telephone option.

 

This post http://www.urtech.ca/2016/02/solved-how-to-activate-windows-10-server-2016-through-command-line/

saved the day.

 

Basically type SLUI 4 in the run dialog to open the manual activation  dialog.

 

Hope this is fixed for RTM otherwise I’ll need a new machine.

Untrusting the Blue Coat Intermediate CA from Windows

So, there was this tweet that got passed around the security community pretty quickly:

Kind of confusing and scary if you’re not quite sure what this all means – perhaps clear and scary if you do.

BlueCoat manufactures “man in the middle” devices – sometimes used by enterprises to scan and inspect / block outbound traffic across their network, and apparently also used by governments to scan and inspect traffic across the network.

The first use is somewhat acceptable (enterprises can prevent their users from distributing viruses or engaging in illicit behaviour from work computers, which the enterprises quite rightly believe they own and should control), but the second use is generally not acceptable, depending on how much you trust your local government.

Filippo helpfully gives instructions on blocking this from OSX, and a few people in the Twitter conversation have asked how to do this on Windows.

Disclaimer!

Don’t do this on a machine you don’t own or manage – you may very well be interfering with legitimate interference in your network traffic. If you’re at work, your employer owns your computer, and may intercept, read and modify your network traffic, subject to local laws, because it’s their network and their computer. If your government has ruled that they have the same rights to intercept Internet traffic throughout your country, you may want to consider whether your government shouldn’t be busy doing other things like picking up litter and contributing to world peace.

The simple Windows way

As with most things on Windows, there’s multiple ways to do this. Here’s one, which can be followed either by regular users or administrators. It’s several steps, but it’s a logical progression, and will work for everyone.

Step 1. Download the certificate. Really, literally, follow the link to the certificate and click “Open”. It’ll pop up as follows:

5-26-2016 3-49-29 PM

Step 2. Install the certificate. Really, literally, click the button that says “Install Certificate…”. You’ll see this prompt asking you where to save it:

5-26-2016 3-49-41 PM

Step 3. If you’re a non-administrator, and just want to untrust this certificate for yourself, leave the Store Location set to “Current User”. If you want to set this for the machine as a whole, and you’re an administrator, select Local Machine, like this:

5-26-2016 3-49-50 PM

Step 4: Click Next, to be asked where you’re putting the certificate:

5-26-2016 3-50-02 PM

Step 5: Select “Place all certificates in the following store”:

5-26-2016 3-50-16 PM

Step 6: Click the “Browse…” button to be given choices of where to place this certificate:

5-26-2016 3-50-23 PM

Step 7: Don’t select “Personal”, because that will explicitly trust the certificate. Scroll down and you’ll see “Untrusted Certificates”. Select that and hit OK:

5-26-2016 3-50-35 PM

Step 8: You’re shown the store you plan to install into:

5-26-2016 3-50-47 PM

Step 9: Click “Next” – and you’ll get a final confirmation option. Read the screen and make sure you really want to do what’s being offered – it’s reversible, but check that you didn’t accidentally install the certificate somewhere wrong. The only place this certificate should go to become untrusted is in the Untrusted Certificates store:

5-26-2016 3-50-52 PM

Step 10: Once you’re sure you have it right, click “Finish”. You’ll be congratulated with this prompt:

5-26-2016 3-50-59 PM

Step 11: Verification. Hit OK on the “import was successful” box. If you still have the Certificate open, close it. Now reopen it, from the link or from the certificate store, or if you downloaded the certificate, from there. It’ll look like this:

5-26-2016 3-51-44 PM

The certificate hasn’t actually been revoked, and you can open up the Untrusted Certificates store to remove this certificate so it’s trusted again if you find any difficulties.

Other methods

There are other methods to do this – if you’re a regular admin user on Windows, I’ll tell you the quicker way is to open MMC.EXE, add the Certificates Snap-in, select to manage either the Local Computer or Current User, navigate to the Untrusted Certificates store and Import the certificate there. For wide scale deployment, there are group policy ways to do this, too.

OK, OK, because you asked, here’s a picture of how to do it by GPO:

5-26-2016 4-49-38 PM

Y shaped people

During the WinOps conference – http://winops.org/ – I attended a session on DevOps culture. At one point the discussion got on to skill sets.

 

I introduced the concept of the Y shaped skillset.

 

You should have a deep understanding on at least one area – C# development, Active Directory, web development, Exchange management – whatever it is you should a ‘go to’ person for that area. That’s represented by the down stroke of the Y

 

In addition in a devops world you ideally need a bunch of skills that span the devops range. At the top you should have a broad understanding across the range of skills – at least enough to have sensible conversations with other practitioners. Those skills can be backed up with a few areas that complement your main skill as you drop deeper into the Y.

 

Over time you may see your main skill set change and what was your primary skill migrate into a secondary area to be replaced by something else.

 

Next time you’re wondering what to learn – think of this model and think about what skills you need to add to complement and build on your current skill set

Windows 10 will require more RAM.. 2GB! OMG!

This is an interesting article in that it states that MS will consider 2 GB of RAM a minimum to run W10 instead of 1 GB. First off, has anyone been able to run it *NOW* with 1GB and not want to smash it to pieces? Second, when was the last time you saw a PC being sold with 1 GB, much less 2 GB?.

If you are someone with 1GB of RAM and you upgrade to W7 or later, you are going to have to upgrade the memory to 2GB *MINIMUM* now, not later.

Microsoft’s “minimum” specs for memory and Windows have lways been a joke.

Windows hardware demands are going up for first time in seven years

Armando una Blockchain (10)

Anterior Post

Esta semana pasado, estuve agregando más lógica a mi proyecto personal de blockchain en JavaScript:

https://github.com/ajlopez/SimpleBlockchain

Como es habitual, usando el flujo de trabajo de TDD (Test-Driven Development). Un primer test creando una blockchain con un bloque genesis:

var blockchains = require('../lib/blockchains');
var blocks = require('../lib/blocks');

exports['create blockchain'] = function (test) {
    var genesis = blocks.block();
    var bc = blockchains.blockchain(genesis);
    
    test.ok(bc);
    test.equal(typeof bc, 'object');
    test.equal(bc.bestBlock(), genesis);
};

Luego, un test agregando un bloque:

exports['add block'] = function (test) {
    var genesis = blocks.block();
    var block = blocks.block(genesis);
    var bc = blockchains.blockchain(genesis);
    
    bc.add(block);
    
    test.equal(bc.bestBlock(), block);
};

El rechazo de un bloque que tiene la misma altura que la blockchain actual:

exports['add block same height'] = function (test) {
    var genesis = blocks.block();
    var block = blocks.block(genesis);
    var block2 = blocks.block(genesis);
    
    var bc = blockchains.blockchain(genesis);
    
    bc.add(block);
    bc.add(block2);
    
    test.equal(bc.bestBlock(), block);
};

Agregar un mejor bloque, y luego, el rechazo de un mejor bloque pero que no deciende del mejor bloque actual:

exports['add block with next height'] = function (test) {
    var genesis = blocks.block();
    var block = blocks.block(genesis);
    var block2 = blocks.block(block);
    
    var bc = blockchains.blockchain(genesis);
    
    bc.add(block);
    bc.add(block2);
    
    test.equal(bc.bestBlock(), block2);
};

exports['add block next height but another parent block'] = function (test) {
    var genesis = blocks.block();
    var block = blocks.block(genesis);
    var block2 = blocks.block(genesis);
    var block3 = blocks.block(block2);
    
    var bc = blockchains.blockchain(genesis);
    
    bc.add(block);
    bc.add(block3);
    
    test.equal(bc.bestBlock(), block);
};

Estos tests fueron escritos uno por uno, y cada test fue seguido de la implementación más simple que pudo hacer pasar el test. Esto es parte del espíritu de TDD: pasos de bebé. implementaciones simples, descripción explícita de la conducta esperada.

Próximos posts: implementando estados de cuentas, estados inmutables, comunicación entre nodos.

Nos leemos!

Angel “Java” Lopez
http://www.ajlopez.com
http://twitter.com/ajlopez

Removal instructions for Dev360 Cleaner

What is Dev360 Cleaner?

The Malwarebytes research team has determined that Dev360 Cleaner is a fake registry cleaner and system optimizer. These programs use intentional false positives to convince users that their systems have problems. Then they try to sell you their software, claiming it will remove these problems.
More information can be found on our Malwarebytes Unpacked blog.

https://forums.malwarebytes.org/topic/183616-removal-instructions-for-dev360-cleaner/

Microsoft Security Bulletin Minor Revisions Issued: May 25, 2016

Summary

The following bulletins and/or bulletin summaries have undergone a
minor revision increment.

Please see the appropriate bulletin for more details.

* MS15-JUL
* MS16-MAY
* MS15-126 – Critical
* MS15-134 – Important
* MS16-003 – Critical
* MS16-054 – Critical

Bulletin Information:

MS15-JUL

– Title: Microsoft Security Bulletin Summary for July 2015
– »technet.microsoft.com/li ··· jul.aspx
– Reason for Revision: V3.1 (May 25, 2016): For MS15-076, added a
Known Issues reference to the Executive Summaries table. For more
information, see Microsoft Knowledge Base Article 3067505. For
information about the solution for this Known Issue, see Microsoft
Knowledge Base Article 3155218.
– Originally posted: July 14, 2015
– Updated: May 25, 2016
– Bulletin Severity Rating: Not applicable
– Version: 3.1

MS16-MAY

– Title: Microsoft Security Bulletin Summary for May 2016
– »technet.microsoft.com/li ··· may.aspx
– Reason for Revision: V2.1 (May 25, 2016): For MS16-065, added a
Known Issue to the Executive Summaries table. After you install
any of the security updates that are included in MS16-065 on a
Front End or Standard Edition server for Lync Server 2010, Lync
Server 2013, or Skype for Business Server 2015, several
conferencing modalities no longer function for internal users.
For information about the solution for this Known Issue, see
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article 3165438.
– Originally posted: May 10, 2016
– Updated: May 25, 2016
– Bulletin Severity Rating: Not applicable
– Version: 2.1

MS15-126

– Title: Cumulative Security Update for JScript and VBScript to
Address Remote Code Execution (3116178)
– »technet.microsoft.com/li ··· 126.aspx
– Reason for Revision: V1.1 (May 25, 2016): Removed redundant
rows from the Vulnerability Severity Rating and Maximum Security
Impact by Affected Software table, and added the applicable
update numbers for clarity. This is an informational change only.
– Originally posted: December 8, 2015
– Updated: May 25, 2016
– Bulletin Severity Rating: Critical
– Version: 1.1

MS15-134

– Title: Security Update for Windows Media Center to Address
Remote Code Execution (3108669)
– »technet.microsoft.com/li ··· 134.aspx
– Reason for Revision: V1.1 (May 25, 2016): Removed the mitigating
factors for CVE-2015-6131 and CVE-2015-6127. These are
informational changes only.
– Originally posted: December 8, 2015
– Updated: May 25, 2016
– Bulletin Severity Rating: Important
– Version: 1.1

MS16-003

– Title: Cumulative Security Update for JScript and VBScript
to Address Remote Code Execution (3125540)
– »technet.microsoft.com/li ··· 003.aspx
– Reason for Revision: V1.1 (May 25, 2016): Removed redundant
rows from the Vulnerability Severity Rating and Maximum Security
Impact by Affected Software table, and added the applicable
update numbers for clarity. This is an informational change only.
– Originally posted: January 12, 2016
– Updated: May 25, 2016
– Bulletin Severity Rating: Critical
– Version: 1.1

MS16-054

– Title: Security Update for Microsoft Office (3155544)
– »technet.microsoft.com/li ··· 054.aspx
– Reason for Revision: V1.1 (May 25, 2016): Corrected the updates
replaced for Microsoft Office 2013 to 3114486 in MS16-004, and
for CVE-2016-0183, clarified that the Preview Pane is an attack
vector for this vulnerability. These are informational changes
only.
– Originally posted: May 10, 2016
– Updated: May 25, 2016
– Bulletin Severity Rating: Critical
– Version: 1.1

Microsoft® Consumer Security MVP, 2004 – 2016
DP’s Security Bits

How to See your Recent Activity of Downloads and Updates in Store app in Windows 10

The Windows Store offers various apps that users can browse through, purchase, or get for free to download and install to their Microsoft account in Windows 10 PCs and devices.

Starting with Windows 10 Insider Preview Build 14342, there’s an update available for the Store app. This new Store app build includes a new Recent activity list in the Downloads and updates section that shows additional information about apps such as the current build number, and the date it was last updated.

This tutorial will show you how to view the recent activity of downloads and updates in the Store app for your account in Windows 10.

Read more…

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