Calling WCF services from a Silverlight 2 app.

As far as I am concerned Silverlight 2 is pretty cool and should have been developed years ago [:)]. Well guess that isn’t the case but it is here now. One thing I like about Silverlight is how easy it is to call a web service. I guess that is a must be because when developing a LOB application in Silverlight you are going to be calling your server to get and store data. So calling the back end is as easy as adding a new Silverlight-enabled WCF Service, implementing the ServiceContract and setting a service reference from your Silverlight … Continue reading Calling WCF services from a Silverlight 2 app.

Using an IronPython runtime service from Windows Workflow Foundation

In this post I demonstrated how to create IronPython objects and call them from strongly typed .NET code. So suppose we want to do so with Windows Workflow Foundation where could we use this? Well the most obvious place would be a runtime service. The example below uses a very simple message that needs to be displayed but it is easy to see how to same concept could be applied in other places. But first the basics. I have created a very simple custom DisplayMessageActivity like this:public partial class DisplayMessageActivity : System.Workflow.ComponentModel.Activity { public DisplayMessageActivity() { } public string Message … Continue reading Using an IronPython runtime service from Windows Workflow Foundation

Red Gate to continue development of .NET Reflector

.NET Reflector, by Lutz Roeder, must be one of the most useful tools I have when developing .NET code. Usually it is the first thing I install right after Visual Studio not even waiting until I need it because I know I will. So the big news is that Red Gate, makers of the Ants profiler and lots of other tools, are taking over from Lutz Roeder and will continue developing .NET Reflector. Interesting move and I hope this means a bright future for the .NET Reflector. Read more about this here.   Enjoy!   [f1][f2]

Two useful batch files when testing with Windows Workflow Foundation

The following are two batch files I use a lot when working with WF persistence and or tracking as I find it desirable to clear the out often. Just drop them in the “C:\WINDOWS\Microsoft.NET\Framework\v3.0\Windows Workflow Foundation\SQL\EN” directory with the four SQL scripts and recreating the required databases is just a few clicks away. CreatePersistence.bat osql -E -S .\sqlexpress -Q “Drop Database WorkflowPersistence”osql -E -S .\sqlexpress -Q “Create Database WorkflowPersistence” osql -E -S .\sqlexpress -d WorkflowPersistence -i SqlPersistenceService_Schema.sqlosql -E -S .\sqlexpress -d WorkflowPersistence -i SqlPersistenceService_Logic.sql   CreateTracking.bat osql -E -S .\sqlexpress -Q “Drop Database WorkflowTracking”osql -E -S .\sqlexpress -Q “Create Database … Continue reading Two useful batch files when testing with Windows Workflow Foundation

.NET Framework 3.5 Enhancements Training Kit

Want to know what is new in the .NET 3.5 SP1 framework or Visual Studio 2008 SP1? Then check out the presentations and labs here: http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?FamilyID=355C80E9-FDE0-4812-98B5-8A03F5874E96&displaylang=en   Overview The .NET Framework 3.5 Enhancements Training Kit includes presentations, hands-on labs, demos, and event materials. This content is designed to help you learn how to utilize the .NET 3.5 Enhancement features including: ASP.NET MVC, ASP.NET Dynamic Data, ASP.NET AJAX History, ASP.NET Routing, ADO.NET Data Services, ADO.NET Entity Framework, WCF 3.5 SP1, and the .NET Framework Client Profile.   Now this is nowhere near complete but a good place to start.   Enjoy!

Calling IronPython functions from .NET

Having worked with Python in the past I find IronPython an interesting language to work with. However the story becomes really interesting if you can combine IronPython with regular strong typed code into one. So I decided to take a look at what it would take to do so with the current IronPython version. I used IronPython 2 Beta 3, based upon the current version of the Dynamic Language Runtime, which is still evolving so the classes might have changed, take care! You can download the latest IronPython release here.   Lets take a look at what it takes to … Continue reading Calling IronPython functions from .NET

Book review: Pro WF by Bruce Bukovics

Windows Workflow Foundation, WF for short, is one of the technologies I work a lot with and as a consequence I own several books about WF. Comparing this book with the others I can only say it is one of the best books you can get on the subject. It has a good coverage of almost all the subject you are going to need to know. Not only is there a good coverage but the explanation and examples are very clear. Now there are a few thing missing from the book. As it was written with the .NET framework 3.0 … Continue reading Book review: Pro WF by Bruce Bukovics

Using a TransactionScopeActivity within a ReceiveActivity in a state machine workflow

Part 1part 2Part 3Part 4 In two previous blog posts, part one and part two, I covered the fact that the ReceiveActivity and the TransactionScopeActivity don’t work together very well. I demonstrated this using a sequential workflow and did show a, clumsy and hacky, workaround to get at least the initial request working. So while the request that starts the sequential workflow could work the same is not true for any subsequent calls. But what about a state workflow? State workflow’s are very different then sequential workflow’s because they are completely event driven. With every state you need to add … Continue reading Using a TransactionScopeActivity within a ReceiveActivity in a state machine workflow

More on using a TransactionScopeActivity within a ReceiveActivity

Part 1part 2Part 3Part 4 In a previous blog post I write about what happens when you place a TransactionScopeActivity within a ReceiveActivity and an exception occurs that is supposed to roll back the transaction. In short the story was very bad and we could come up with only a partial workaround, not a pretty sight.   But there is more to it than just that little horror story. Suppose you do the obvious and place the a TransactionScopeActivity within a ReceiveActivity and no exception occurs. Say like the workflow below, please note that the codeActivity1 only sets the return … Continue reading More on using a TransactionScopeActivity within a ReceiveActivity