Surface Book and a 4K monitor

With 4K TVs coming down in price I was curious to see if I could use a 4K TV as a monitor with my Surface Book.

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For this discussion I’m using the UHD-1 definition
4K is  3840 x 2160 pixels
That’s the equivalent of four 1920 x 1080 monitors.

Why would anyone want to do this? Well in my case it was because I was already running four 24” monitors with 1920 x 1080 pixel resolution. When I came across a great deal on a 48 inch 4K TV it held the promise to get the equivalent of my four monitors all on one screen.

I had already shopped around and tried a couple of those 21:9 monitors. These are 3440 x 1440 and there are several of these 34” monitors..  The result was less than I wanted because there wasn’t enough screen real estate to replace my four monitors. 
(3440 x 1440 vs. 3840 x 2160)

I had already tried several 4K monitors and found that the Surface Book could run with fine in Duplicate mode (3000 x 2000) on both the Surface Book and the external monitor, but in Extend Mode, I couldn’t get the external monitor to run 3840 x 2160. I have since found out that not all mini-display port to HDMI adapters are equal.

In my hunt to find just the right combination I found a retail store that was willing to let me try different 4K TVs who happened to have a mini-display port to HDMI adapter that worked.   I got a 48” curved screen TV.  Got it back to my place and it wouldn’t run at full resolution.  The difference – I wasn’t using the same mini-display port to HDMI adapter, so I went back to the store to get one of theirs.  And it all worked.

This is the TV that I got. This is information NOT a recommendation. It’s too soon for that.  
Samsung UN48JU6700 Curved 48-Inch 4K Ultra HD Smart LED TV

A Note to Our Customers from The Microsoft Surface Team

 

A Note to Our Customers from The Microsoft Surface Team

Josh_F

Josh_F asked on December 11, 2015See post history

Accomplishments

First, a big thanks to all of our customers for your open and candid feedback on Surface Book and Surface Pro 4. For those of you who’ve had a less-than-perfect experience, we’re sorry for any frustration this has caused. Please know that we’re reading your comments and hearing you loud and clear. Your input is incredibly valuable in helping us address your questions with timely updates and fixes. Since launch, we have aggressively pursued the most pressing feedback. We have already issued a number of updates via Windows Update and are working to issue additional updates and fixes as soon as possible to further improve the overall Surface experience. To ensure that you have received the most recent updates, we recommend you check out our support page with instructions on how to download and install the latest Surface and Windows updates. Surface Book update history can be found here and Surface Pro 4 update history can be found here.     

Thanks again for your feedback. We’ll continue to communicate as updates and fixes become available via moderator posts to http://answers.microsoft.com/forum/surface. If you have any additional support questions, please visit our main support page.

-The Microsoft Surface Team

Source: http://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/surface/forum/surfpro4-surfperf/a-note-to-our-customers-from-the-microsoft-surface/b9f3e9c7-3643-4de3-9468-1e2b4c18dbd1?auth=1

The First Application I Install

When I set up a new machine there is a suite of applications that I install immediately. ActiveWords is at the top of the list and has been for over a decade.

I do a lot of writing every day and a great deal of it is repetitive. Snippets of text, links to references, common phrases and I do this dozens of times an hour. ActiveWords sits there quietly monitoring my keystrokes and it automatically substitutes text, runs scripts to do tasks, opens documents, opens websites.  And it does all this from within any application that I am running.

There’s a nifty little tool that  calculates the productivity savings you gave gained from running ActiveWords.  On my Surface Book ActiveWords has typed 16,532 characters for me in the last month. That is over 6% of my total input.  If you could see how hideously slowly I type you could well understand that this has saved me hours of typing.   Licensing is per user on unlimited machines. Although I use my Surface Book as my daily driver, I still use the Surface Pro 3 and Surface 3 too. There are even a few desktops and servers around here. I have ActiveWords running on all of them.

The scripting feature is very clever allowing you to pause and prompt for inputs, read from and write to the Windows Clipboard, call programs and pass data. All of this is beyond simple text substitution and saves me a great deal of time. Adding or modifying new ActiveWords is really fast and intuitive. I will often notice that I have done something two or three times lately so I’ll copy/paste those into ActiveWords, assign an ActiveWord (e.g. answers – see below), and it’s done.   

One of the main reasons I first got ActiveWords is that it also recognizes Ink!  I can use the Surface pen to write an ActiveWord too.
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This opens the thread on Microsoft Answers that I like to follow.

ActiveWords just did an update to version 3.0 and with that comes automatic syncing between devices. That is, when I add or change an ActiveWord on one machine it is available on all of them. This is a major upgrade for me given all the machines that I have on the go.

In my most conservative estimates ActiveWords more than pays for itself (overcomes the $30 annual license) within the first 10 days of any given month.  And that’s why it’s the first application I install on all of my machines.