Removing Orphaned Populated msExchangeDelegateLinkList and msExchangeDelegateLinkListBL Automapping Attributes

By Ace Fekay
Published 5/11/2017
Revamped 3/31/2018 – Added the option to selectively remove BLs without removing FullAccess permissions to the shared mailbox

Scope

How to remove a shared mailbox that keeps showing up in your Outlook profile that you’ve been removed as a delegate.

This shows how to remove the mailbox permissions and to re-add, and I just added how to simply just remove the backlinks WITHOUT removing FullAccess permissions. The users in this case, must re-add the mailbox in Outlook once it disappears from their profile.

Automapping

Automapping is an Autodiscover feature that was added to Exchange 2010 SP1 and newer, that allows Outlook to automatically add a delegated mailbox without additional tasks.

Autodiscover looks at the mailbox owner’s AD account for an attribute called the MSExchDelegateListLink attribute.

When you use the EAC or PowerShell to delegate permissions to a shared mailbox or to another user, Exchange will automatically set the Automapping feature to $True. In PowerShell you can disable this, but not in the EAC.

This feature populates the MSExchDelegateListLink attribute on the shared or delegated mailbox with the user accounts that will be Automapped, and vice-versa, it also populates the MSExchDelegateLinkListBL attribute on the user account. I look at this as the “back link” to the shared mailbox.

These two attributes are one of  nine (9) links and backlinks that exist. Here’s a list of all links and backlinks in AD and more specifics can be found at the following link:
http://www.neroblanco.co.uk/2015/07/links-and-backlinks-in-active-directory-for-exchange/

Outlook, Autodiscover, and those attributes

When Outlook fires up, and while running, part of what Autodiscover process performs is it will check these two attributes to determine if there are any shared mailboxes that must be automatically added to the Outlook profile. In some cases using a managed process for shared mailboxes, we may want this feature disabled so the shared mailbox does not get automatically added.

Orphaned Backlink is still populated and the mailbox still shows up in Outlook

If the user was previously delegated to a shared mailbox, then the delegated per,missions were removed, but for some reason, perhaps replication or corruption, or some other unforeseen factor (large environments fall under this category), the shared mailbox still shows up and you can’t get rid of it, and further, since you no longer have permissions, you can’t open it. This will cause the shared or delegated mailbox to still show up in Outlook. But you can clearly see in EAC or running a get-mailboxpermission that the user is no longer delegated.

Example of an account with the msExchDelegateLinkListBL still populated:

image

How to remove it?

First, establish your PowerShell session to Exchange OnPrem or your Office 365 tenant. If unsure how, see this:
http://blogs.msmvps.com/acefekay/2017/05/11/establishing-a-powershell-session-to-your-office-365-tenant-or-onprem-exchange/

Determine, if any, links or backlinks exist on the shared mailbox:

Get-ADUser “SharedMailboxDisplayName” -Properties msExchDelegateListLink | Select-object -ExpandProperty msExchDelegateListLink

If any show up, you’ll see their sAMAccountNames. If you don’t know who the sAMAccountNames are and you want to see their displayNames, run the following (this command works for DNs, too):

For one account:
get-aduser sAMAccountName -Properties displayName,mail  | ft Name, DisplayName, mail -A

For a list of accounts in a text file:
get-content c:\temp\names.txt | get-aduser -Properties displayName,mail  | ft Name, DisplayName, mail –A

 

Then remove the msexchDelegateLinkListBL orphaned backlink and FullAccess permissions to the shared mailbox

Note: I’m using the shared mailbox’s displayName. This will also work using the sAMAaccountName or the primary email address.

For one account:
Remove-MailboxPermission “SharedMailboxDisplayName” -user $_ –AccessRights FullAccess -Confirm:$false

For a list of accounts in a text file:
get-content c:\temp\ace\userIDs\users.txt | foreach {Remove-MailboxPermission “SharedMailboxDisplayName”  -user $_ –AccessRights FullAccess -Confirm:$false}

Then if needed, delegate the shared mailbox again & disabling Automapping

Delegate Ace to a shared mailbox:
Add-MailboxPermission “Shared Mailbox Name or email address” -User AceFekay@contoso.com -AccessRights FullAccess -AutoMapping:$false

To just remove the backlink WITHOUT removing permissions

Note, using this method, the shared mailbox will automatically disappear from the Outlook profile. As soon as it does, you must manually re-add the shared mailbox either under the user account properties, where the permissions are proxied through the user account, which is the same as if it were Automapped, or as a separate account, which provides better features including sent and deleted items go into the shared mailbox itself instead of the mailbox owner under an automapped account or added under the user account.

To remove all BLs all at once:

#########################################################
#Remove the MSExchDelegateListBL from an account

$userToClean = “I061859”
  $userDN = Get-ADUser $userToClean | select -ExpandProperty DistinguishedName
  $delegates = Get-ADUser $userToClean -Properties msExchDelegateListBL |  select -ExpandProperty msExchDelegateListBL
  Write-Host “======================================================”
  write-host “List of Delegated accounts that are backlinked:” $Delegates
  Write-Host “======================================================”
  foreach ($delegate in $delegates) {
  Set-ADUser $delegate -Remove @{msExchDelegateListLink = “$UserDN”}
  }
  Write-Host “======================================================”
  Write-Host “If the following get-aduser cmdlet searching for backlinds is empty, then all delegated backlinks have been removed”
  Get-ADUser $user -Properties msExchDelegateListBL |  select -ExpandProperty msExchDelegateListBL
  Write-Host “======================================================”

To remove specific BLs one at a time:

# 1. Find the list of users in a shared mailbox that have been backlinked.
#    Note, as said, this is only for removing users that have requested it, unless you are working on removing all, which use the above

$SharedMailboxOrUserDisplayName = “Shared Mailbox Display Name”
$SharedMailboxOrUser = (get-recipient “$SharedMailboxOrUserDisplayName”).name
Write-Host “======================================================”
Write-host “Shared Mailbox sAMAccountName:” $sharedMailboxorUser
Write-host “List of Users (or ‘Delegates’) that currently have Backlinks on Shared mailbox ‘$sharedMailboxorUser’ :”
Get-ADUser $SharedMailboxOrUser  -Properties msExchDelegateListLink | Select-object -ExpandProperty msExchDelegateListLink | get-aduser -Properties displayName,mail  | ft Name,DisplayName,mail -A
write-host “======================================================”

# 2. Then enter the user account name from the above list that you want to remove, and then find the user’s DN:
  $UserToClean = “User sAMAccountName”
  $userToCleanDisplayName = (get-recipient $UserToClean).displayName
  $userDN = Get-ADUser $UserToClean | select -ExpandProperty DistinguishedName
  Write-Host “The DN of ‘$userToCleanDisplayName’ ($UserToClean) that you want to clean is: ” $userDN
  Write-Host “======================================================”
  write-host “List of Backlink DNs that you want to remove from $UsertoClean :”
  Write-Host
  Get-ADUser  $UserToClean -Properties msExchDelegateListbl |  select -ExpandProperty msExchDelegateListBL

  Write-Host  “======================================================”

# 3. Remove the MSExchDelegateListBL from my account or an account that was migrated to the cloud that previously had a MSExchDelegateListBL
#    Just have to run this, the BL gets removed after you run it
#    This does not remove any AccessRights to the Mailbox, it just removes the automapping

Set-ADUser  $UserToClean -Remove @{msExchDelegateListLink = (Copy and Paste the Backlink DN of the specific shared mailbox from the previous list that you want to remove) }

# 4. Then check to see if it worked:
   Get-ADUser  $UserToClean -Properties msExchDelegateListBL |  select -ExpandProperty msExchDelegateListBL
   Get-ADUser  $UserToClean -Properties msExchDelegateListLink |  select -ExpandProperty msExchDelegateListBL

==========================================================

Summary

I hope this helps!

Published 5/18/2017

Ace Fekay
MVP, MCT, MCSE 2012, MCITP EA & MCTS Windows 2008/R2, Exchange 2013, 2010 EA & 2007, MCSE & MCSA 2003/2000, MCSA Messaging 2003
Microsoft Certified Trainer
Microsoft MVP – Directory Services

As many know, I work with Active Directory, Exchange server, and Office 365 engineer/architect, and an MVP in Active Directory and Identity Management, and I’m an MCT as well. I try to strive to perform my job with the best of my ability and efficiency, even when presented with a challenge, and then help others with my findings in case a similar issue arises to help ease their jobs. Share the knowledge, is what I’ve always learned.

I’ve found there are many qualified and very informative websites that provide how-to blogs, and I’m glad they exists and give due credit to the pros that put them together. In some cases when I must research an issue, I just needed something or specific that I couldn’t find or had to piece together from more than one site, such as a simple one-liner or a simple multiline script to perform day to day stuff.

I hope you’ve found this blog post helpful, along with my future scripts blog posts, especially with AD, Exchange, and Office 365.

clip_image0023 clip_image0043 clip_image0063 clip_image0083 clip_image0103 clip_image0123 clip_image0143 clip_image0163

Complete List of Technical Blogs: http://www.delawarecountycomputerconsulting.com/technicalblogs.php

Or just search within my blogs:
https://blogs.msmvps.com/acefekay/

This posting is provided AS-IS with no warranties or guarantees and confers no rights.


 

Exchange or Office 365 Mailbox Dumpster Report

By Ace Fekay
Published 2/21/2018

Intro

This is another quick script to enumerate what’s in the dumpster, that I’ve created to help my day to day tasks. I hope you find it helpful.

Scope

This script enumerates an Exchange or Office 365 Dumpster, Purges, and Versions folders.

Note:

  • Dumpster and Deletions Report provides Size Values for the mailbox
  • Deleted items’, ‘Recover Deleted Items’ (Dumpster), and ‘Purges’ values.
    Does not apply to Mailusers” -ForegroundColor cyan
    *** If Lit Hold is present, Recover and Purges will be larger and must be ignored.) ***

The ‘Recoverable Items’ folder contains the following subfolders

  1. Recoverable Items: This is the total amount combined in Deletions, Calendar Logging, Purges, and Versions.
  2. Calendar Logging:  For Calendar diagnostic purposes

  3. Deletions
    : Recover Deleted Items or the ‘Dumpster'”
         This subfolder contains all items deleted from the Deleted Items folder.
  4. Versions:          If In-Place Hold or Litigation Hold is enabled:
    This subfolder contains the original and modified copies of the deleted items.”
  5. Purges:            If either Litigation Hold or single item recovery is enabled:”
    This subfolder contains all items that are hard deleted.

Script

I did not make this into a function, although it can easily be converted. To run it, for the $RecipientName variable, just enter the username, email address, displayName, or their sAMAccountName, and fire away.

“======================================================”
$RecipientName = “user’s email address, DisplayName, or sAMAccountName”
$RecipientDisplayName = (get-recipient $RecipientName).displayname

Optional (for reporting purposed):

$RecipientNetBIOSName = (get-recipient $RecipientName).name
$RecipientPrimAlias = (get-recipient $RecipientName).PrimarySmtpAddress

“======================================================” -ForegroundColor Cyan                   
  write-host “Dumpster and Deletions Report for ‘$RecipientDisplayName’ ($RecipientName) (Does not apply to Mailusers or Contacts):” “$(get-date)” -ForegroundColor Yellow
     Write-host “======================================================”
Write-host “Dumpster and Deletions Report provides Size Values for the mailbox ‘Deleted items’, ‘Recover Deleted Items’ (Dumpster), and ‘Purges’ values.”  -ForegroundColor Cyan
     Write-Host “Does not apply to Mailusers” -ForegroundColor cyan
     Write-Host “*** If Lit Hold is present, Recover and Purges will be larger and must be ignored.) ***”  -ForegroundColor Red
     Write-Host “***”
     Write-host “The ‘Recoverable Items’ folder contains the following subfolders:” -ForegroundColor Yellow
     Write-Host ”   Recoverable Items: This is the total amount combined in Deletions, Calendar Logging, Purges, and Versions.”
     Write-Host ”   Calendar Logging:  For Calendar diagnostic purposes”
     Write-Host ”   Deletions:         Recover Deleted Items or the ‘Dumpster'”
     Write-host ”                      This subfolder contains all items deleted from the Deleted Items folder. “
     Write-Host ”   Versions:          If In-Place Hold or Litigation Hold is enabled:”
     Write-Host ”                      This subfolder contains the original and modified copies of the deleted items.”
     Write-Host ”   Purges:            If either Litigation Hold or single item recovery is enabled:”
     Write-host ”                      This subfolder contains all items that are hard deleted.”
     Write-host “======================================================” -ForegroundColor Cyan
Get-MailboxFolderStatistics $RecipientName -FolderScope RecoverableItems | ft Name,FolderAndSubfolderSize, @{name=”LitigationHoldEnabled”;expression={(Get-mailbox $RecipientName).LitigationHoldEnabled}} –a
##########################################################

Report Output

(Watch the word-wrap):

=================================================================================================
Dumpster and Deletions Report for ‘User DisplayName’ (SAP Legal Operations) (Does not apply to Mailusers): 03/27/2018 11:22:01
=================================================================================================
Dumpster and Deletions Report provides Size Values for the mailbox ‘Deleted items’, ‘Recover Deleted Items’ (Dumpster), and ‘Purges’ values.
Does not apply to Mailusers
*** If Lit Hold is present, Recover and Purges will be larger and must be ignored.) ***
***
The ‘Recoverable Items’ folder contains the following subfolders:
    Recoverable Items: This is the total amount combined in Deletions, Calendar Logging, Purges, and Versions.
    Calendar Logging:  For Calendar diagnostic purposes
    Deletions:         Recover Deleted Items or the ‘Dumpster’
                       This subfolder contains all items deleted from the Deleted Items folder.
    Versions:          If In-Place Hold or Litigation Hold is enabled:
                       This subfolder contains the original and modified copies of the deleted items.
    Purges:            If either Litigation Hold or single item recovery is enabled:
                       This subfolder contains all items that are hard deleted.
=================================================================================================

Name              FolderAndSubfolderSize     LitigationHoldEnabled
—-              ———————-     ———————
Recoverable Items 1.32 MB (1,383,783 bytes)                  False
Calendar Logging  0 B (0 bytes)                              False
Deletions         1.196 MB (1,253,945 bytes)                 False
Purges            126.8 KB (129,838 bytes)                   False
Versions          0 B (0 bytes)                              False

Clear on the picture for a full view:

image

Summary

I hope this helps!

Published 3/27/2018

Ace Fekay
MVP, MCT, MCSE 2012, MCITP EA & MCTS Windows 2012|R2, 2008|R2, Exchange 2013|2010EA|2007, MCSE & MCSA 2003/2000, MCSA Messaging 2003
Microsoft Certified Trainer
Microsoft MVP – Mobility

As many know, I work with Active Directory, Exchange server, and Office 365 engineer/architect, and an MVP in Active Directory and Identity Management, and I’m an MCT as well. I try to strive to perform my job with the best of my ability and efficiency, even when presented with a challenge, and then help others with my findings in case a similar issue arises to help ease their jobs. Share the knowledge, is what I’ve always learned.

I’ve found there are many qualified and very informative websites that provide how-to blogs, and I’m glad they exists and give due credit to the pros that put them together. In some cases when I must research an issue, I just needed something or specific that I couldn’t find or had to piece together from more than one site, such as a simple one-liner or a simple multiline script to perform day to day stuff.

I hope you’ve found this blog post helpful, along with my future scripts blog posts, especially with AD, Exchange, and Office 365.

clip_image0023 clip_image0043 clip_image0063 clip_image0083 clip_image0103 clip_image0123 clip_image0143 clip_image0163

Complete List of Technical Blogs
https://blogs.msmvps.com/acefekay/

This posting is provided AS-IS with no warranties or guarantees and confers no rights.


 

What DNS Zone type should I use, a Stub, Conditional Forwarder, a Forwarder, or a Secondary Zone?? What’s the Difference??

By Ace Fekay
Originally Published 2012
Updated 3/20/2018

Intro

Ace again. DNS is a basic, yet important requirement that many still having problems wrapping their head around it.

Besides design, a huge part of DNS is understanding the differences between the zone types. Many have asked, when do I use a Stub zone, a Conditional Forwarder, or a Forwarder? Or better, what’s the difference?

I thought to put this simple comparison together compiled from past posts in the TechNet Forum.

Partner Organization DNS Resolution: What should I use, a Stub, Conditional Forwarder or Forwarder?

Secondary Zone

Secondary zones are read only copies “copied,” or “zone transferred” from a Master zone. This makes the zone data available locally (as read only, of course), instead of querying a DNS server across a WAN link. However, in many cases Secondaries are not used due to many limitations and security concerns, such as exposing all DNS zone data that a partner may not want to divulge.

In addition, Secondaries can’t be AD integrated, and the zone data is stored in a text file. So you would have to manually create a copy on all of your DNS servers.

Stub Zone

Organizations own their own AD zones. When business partners need to resolve data at a partner’s organization, there are a few options to support this requirement. Years ago, prior to Stub or Conditional Forwarders, there weren’t many options to handle this other than to use Secondary Zones and keep copies of each others zones via zone transfers.  While the solution worked well in regards to name resolution, it was not the best security-wise, due to trust level between partners, because zone data is fully exposed at the partner. This became a security concern because the partner is able to see all of their business partner’s records. When the zone was transferred to partners, who knows what they were doing with the information. If the information was made public, attackers would have a field day with all of the IPs for the networked devices.

When stub zones were made available, it became a solution to overcome this security issue. What is also beneficial about Stubs, is you can AD integrate them instead of manually creating a Stub on each individual DC. This way the zone will be available domain or forest-wide, depending on replication scope.

However, some may say due to the fact that the SOA records are included in the zone file, it may be a concern that the SOA and NS data is exposed. In such high security concerns, the better solution would be to use a Conditional forwarder.

Conditional Forwarder

This option is heavily used, and many look at them as the best regarding security concerns with zone data exposure, because no data is exposed. This option has worked very well in many environments.

With Conditional Forwarders, no information is being transerred and shared. The only thing you would need to know is one or more of your business partner’s DNS server IPs to configure it, and they don’t have to be the SOA, rather any DNS server that hosts the zone or that has a reference to the zone.

However, it does require open communication and let each other know when their DNS server IPs may change, because you must manually set them.

Windows 2003 introduced Conditional Forwarders, but it did not have the option to make it AD Integrated. If you have 10 DNS servers, you must create the Conditional Forwarder on each server manually. The AD integrated option was added to Windows 2008 or newer DNS servers, so you don’t have to manually create them on each DNS server. THis way the Conditional Forwarder will be available domain or forest-wide.

Parent-Child DNS Zone Delegation

Delegation can be used in a situation where a child domain host their own DNS zone.  Therefore in the forest root domain, you would create a delegation zone with the IPs of the DNS servers in the child domain.  This is normally performed when the child zone have their own administrators. It’s also useful they do not have access to “see” all of the forest root DNS records.

Summary

I hope this helps! If you have any questions, and I’m sure you do, please feel free to reach out to me.

Major revision – Published 3/20/2018

Ace Fekay
MVP, MCT, MCSE 2012, MCITP EA & MCTS Windows 2012|R2, 2008|R2, Exchange 2013|2010EA|2007, MCSE & MCSA 2003/2000, MCSA Messaging 2003
Microsoft Certified Trainer
Microsoft MVP – Mobility

As many know, I work with Active Directory, Exchange server, and Office 365 engineer/architect, and an MVP in Active Directory and Identity Management, and I’m an MCT as well. I try to strive to perform my job with the best of my ability and efficiency, even when presented with a challenge, and then help others with my findings in case a similar issue arises to help ease their jobs. Share the knowledge, is what I’ve always learned.

I’ve found there are many qualified and very informative websites that provide how-to blogs, and I’m glad they exists and give due credit to the pros that put them together. In some cases when I must research an issue, I just needed something or specific that I couldn’t find or had to piece together from more than one site, such as a simple one-liner or a simple multiline script to perform day to day stuff.

I hope you’ve found this blog post helpful, along with my future scripts blog posts, especially with AD, Exchange, and Office 365.

clip_image0023 clip_image0043 clip_image0063 clip_image0083 clip_image0103 clip_image0123 clip_image0143 clip_image0163

Complete List of Technical Blogs
https://blogs.msmvps.com/acefekay/

This posting is provided AS-IS with no warranties or guarantees and confers no rights.


 

Get-Rules

By Ace Fekay
Published 2/21/2018

Intro

This is another quick script I created to help my day to day tasks. I hope you find it helpful.

Like I said before, I’m far from being an expert, but I continue to read up on it, research, and ask lots of questions. The more you work at something, the more you get something out of it. Ever play pool?

Scope

This script will enumerate the Inbox rules for a mailbox. You will have four options:

  1. List of rules without a description using FT
  2. List of rules with a description using FT
  3. Rules listed individually using FL
  4. Rules sent to a CSV file named based on the user account entered

Get-Rule Script

Copy and paste the following into notepad, and save it as Get-UserList.ps1, and run it to load the function.

#################################\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\////////////////#################################
# This script will:
# 1. Read a console entry for a user accounts, whether a sAMAccountName, alias, or email address
# 2. Provide a list of rules without descriptions
# 3. Provide a list of rules with descriptions
#
#    .SYNOPSIS
#    Lists a User’s Mailbox InboxRules
#
#    .DESCRIPTION
#    Enumerate Inbox rules with and without a description
#
#    .PARAMETER User
#    Specific user you want to search for.
#
#    .PARAMETER Description
#    You want the rules listed out individually with a description
#
#    .PARAMETER NoDescription
#    You want the rules listed out in table format without a description
#
#    .PARAMETER NoDescription
#    You want the rules listed out in table format without a description
#
#################################\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\////////////////#################################
# Variables

$RecipientName = “I823135”
$RecipientDisplayName = (get-recipient $RecipientName).displayname
$RecipientNetBIOSName = (get-recipient $RecipientName).name
$RecipientPrimAlias = (get-recipient $RecipientName).PrimarySmtpAddress

# Script

Function Get-Rules {
[CmdletBinding()]
Param (
[Parameter(Position=0,Mandatory=$true)]
[string]$RecipientName,

[Parameter(Mandatory=$false)]
[switch]$Description,

[Parameter(Mandatory=$false)]
[switch]$NoDescription,

[Parameter(Mandatory=$false)]
[switch]$IndividualList,

[Parameter(Mandatory=$false)]
[switch]$CSVFile
)

$RecipientDisplayName = (get-recipient $RecipientName).displayname
$RecipientNetBIOSName = (get-recipient $RecipientName).name
$RecipientPrimAlias = (get-recipient $RecipientName).PrimarySmtpAddress

#If -Description was selected – Inboxrules to Console Screen:
If ($NoDescription) {
Write-Host “=================================================================================================” -ForegroundColor Cyan
Write-Host “You’ve selected to List the Inbox Rules to the Console Without a Description” -ForegroundColor Magenta
write-host “INBOX Rules for Mailbox ‘$RecipientDisplayName’ ($Recipientname):”  “$(get-date)” -ForegroundColor Yellow
Write-Host “=================================================================================================” -ForegroundColor Cyan
Get-InboxRule -mailbox $RecipientName -IncludeHidden | ft @{name=”DisplayName”;expression={(get-recipient $RecipientName).displayname}}, name,enabled,priority,ruleidentity,forward*,RedirectTo,movetofolder,inerror,errortype -Wrap -a
Write-Host “=================================================================================================” -ForegroundColor Cyan
}

#If -NoDescription was selected – Inboxrules to Console Screen :
If ($Description) {
Write-Host “You’ve selected to List the Inbox Rules to the Console With a Description” -ForegroundColor Magenta
write-host “INBOX Rules for Mailbox ‘$RecipientDisplayName’ ($Recipientname):”  “$(get-date)” -ForegroundColor Yellow
Write-Host “=================================================================================================” -ForegroundColor Cyan
Get-InboxRule -mailbox $RecipientName -IncludeHidden | ft name,enabled,priority,ruleidentity,RedirectTo,movetofolder,inerror,errortype,description    -Wrap
#    Get-InboxRule -Mailbox $RecipientName -IncludeHidden | ft -AutoSize
#    (Get-InboxRule -Mailbox $RecipientName -IncludeHidden | ft -AutoSize).count
# FL –      Get-InboxRule -mailbox $RecipientName -IncludeHidden | fl @{name=”DisplayName”;expression={(get-recipient $RecipientName).displayname}}, name,enabled,priority,ruleidentity,forward*,RedirectTo,movetofolder,inerror,errortype,description
# Select –  Get-InboxRule -mailbox $RecipientName -IncludeHidden | select  @{name=”DisplayName”;expression={(get-recipient $RecipientName).displayname}}, name,enabled,priority,ruleidentity,forward*,RedirectTo,movetofolder,inerror,errortype,description
Write-Host “=================================================================================================” -ForegroundColor Cyan
$TotalRulesCount = ((Get-InboxRule -mailbox $RecipientName -IncludeHidden | measure-object).count)
Write-Host “Total Number of rules for $Recipientname is” $TotalRulesCount -ForegroundColor Magenta
Write-Host “=================================================================================================” -ForegroundColor Cyan
}
#################################\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\////////////////#################################

#If -IndividualList is selected
If ($IndividualList) {
Write-Host “You’ve selected to list each InboxRule individually” -ForegroundColor Magenta
write-host “INBOX Rules for Mailbox ‘$RecipientDisplayName’ ($Recipientname):”  “$(get-date)” -ForegroundColor Yellow
Write-Host “=================================================================================================” -ForegroundColor Cyan
Get-InboxRule -mailbox $RecipientName -IncludeHidden | fl @{name=”DisplayName”;expression={(get-recipient $RecipientName).displayname}}, name,enabled,priority,ruleidentity,forward*,RedirectTo,movetofolder,inerror,errortype,description
Write-Host “=================================================================================================” -ForegroundColor Cyan
$TotalRulesCount = ((Get-InboxRule -mailbox $RecipientName -IncludeHidden | measure-object).count)
Write-Host “Total Number of rules for $Recipientname is” $TotalRulesCount -ForegroundColor Magenta
Write-Host “=================================================================================================” -ForegroundColor Cyan
}
#################################\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\////////////////#################################

 

If ($CSVFile) {
#####################################################################################
#Inboxrules to CSV file
Write-Host “=================================================================================================” -ForegroundColor Cyan
Write-Host “You’ve selected to send the Inbox Rules to a CSV file.” -ForegroundColor Magenta
Write-host
Write-Host “Rules list was sent to a CSV file located at ***C:\temp\InboxRules-for-$RecipientName.csv***” -ForegroundColor Yellow
$TotalRulesCount = ((Get-InboxRule -mailbox $RecipientName -IncludeHidden | measure-object).count)
Write-Host
Write-Host “Total Number of rules for $Recipientname is” $TotalRulesCount -ForegroundColor Magenta
#Write-Host “=================================================================================================” -ForegroundColor Cyan
Get-InboxRule -mailbox $RecipientName -IncludeHidden | select @{name=”DisplayName”;expression={(get-recipient $RecipientName).displayname}}, name,enabled,priority,ruleidentity,description | export-csv “C:\temp\InboxRules-for-$RecipientName.csv”
Write-Host “=================================================================================================” -ForegroundColor Cyan
} }

 

How to run it

Create a list in notepad, save it as a txt file in c:\temp, or anywhere else and reference that in the script, then run:

get-Rules aceman –description –nodescription –individuallist –csv

Summary

I hope this helps!

Published 2/21/2018

Ace Fekay
MVP, MCT, MCSE 2012, MCITP EA & MCTS Windows 2012|R2, 2008|R2, Exchange 2013|2010EA|2007, MCSE & MCSA 2003/2000, MCSA Messaging 2003
Microsoft Certified Trainer
Microsoft MVP – Mobility

As many know, I work with Active Directory, Exchange server, and Office 365 engineer/architect, and an MVP in Active Directory and Identity Management, and I’m an MCT as well. I try to strive to perform my job with the best of my ability and efficiency, even when presented with a challenge, and then help others with my findings in case a similar issue arises to help ease their jobs. Share the knowledge, is what I’ve always learned.

I’ve found there are many qualified and very informative websites that provide how-to blogs, and I’m glad they exists and give due credit to the pros that put them together. In some cases when I must research an issue, I just needed something or specific that I couldn’t find or had to piece together from more than one site, such as a simple one-liner or a simple multiline script to perform day to day stuff.

I hope you’ve found this blog post helpful, along with my future scripts blog posts, especially with AD, Exchange, and Office 365.

clip_image0023 clip_image0043 clip_image0063 clip_image0083 clip_image0103 clip_image0123 clip_image0143 clip_image0163

Complete List of Technical Blogs
https://blogs.msmvps.com/acefekay/

This posting is provided AS-IS with no warranties or guarantees and confers no rights.


Listing SendAs and SendOnBehalf Permissions

By Ace Fekay
Published 3/20/2018

Intro

Ace here again.

There are a number of tools that you can use in your day to day AD and Exchange management. This includes Office 365 Hybrid, but we’ll assume that you are performing one way sync to the cloud, and only replicating MSOL attributes back to on premises, so you can manage them locally, for the most part.

This is about getting SendAs and SendOnBehalf rights on a mailbox

SendAs

(Watch word-wrap)

Write-Host “*****************************************************************”
$Mailbox = Ace.Fekay@MSOLUser.com
$MailboxDisplayName = (get-recipient $Mailbox).displayName
Write-Host “///////////////////////////////—-\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\”
Write-Host “*****************************************************************”
Write-host “The following is a list of who has SendAs permissions for ‘$MailboxDisplayName’ :”
Write-Host “*****************************************************************”
Get-recipient $Mailbox | Get-ADPermission | where {($_.ExtendedRights -like “*Send-As*”) -and ($_.IsInherited -eq $false) -and -not ($_.User -like “NT AUTHORITY\SELF”)} | FT user, @{name=”User’s DisplayName”;expression={(Get-recipient $_.User).Displayname}}, extendedRights -AutoSize
$MailboxCount = @(Get-recipient $Mailbox | Get-ADPermission  | where {($_.ExtendedRights -like “*Send-As*”) -and ($_.IsInherited -eq $false) -and -not ($_.User -like “NT AUTHORITY\SELF”)}).count
Write-Host “Total number of users that can SendAs on contact ‘$MailboxDisplayName’ is” $MailboxCount
Write-Host “*****************************************************************”

Write-Host “\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\—-///////////////////////////////”
Write-Host “*****************************************************************”

SendOnBehalf

(Watch word-wrap)

Write-Host “*****************************************************************”
$Mailbox =
$MailboxDisplayName = (get-recipient $Mailbox).displayName
Write-host “The following is a list of who has SendOnBehalf permissions for ‘$MailboxDisplayName’ :”
Write-Host “*****************************************************************”
# – property not found – $sendonbehalfList = (get-recipient $Mailbox | select -ExpandProperty GrantsendOnBehalfto | foreach { Get-Mailbox $_ | select displayname, name})
$sendonbehalfList = (get-mailbox $Mailbox | select -ExpandProperty GrantsendOnBehalfto | foreach { Get-Mailbox $_ | select displayname, name})
#Get-recipient $Mailbox | Get-ADPermission | where {($_.ExtendedRights -like “Grant*”) -and ($_.IsInherited -eq $false) -and -not ($_.User -like “NT AUTHORITY\SELF”)} | FT user, @{name=”User’s DisplayName”;expression={(Get-User $_.User).Displayname}}, extendedRights -AutoSize
Write-Host “And the list of who have SendOnBehalf on ‘$MailboxDisplayName’ is:” $SendonBehalfList  
Write-Host “*****************************************************************”

Example output:

*****************************************************************
///////////////////////////////—-\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\
*****************************************************************
The following is a list of who has SendAs permissions for ‘Fekay, Ace’ :
*****************************************************************
User            User’s DisplayName                           ExtendedRights
—-            ——————                                          ————–
Contoso\AFekay-Admin Fekay, Ace (Admin Only) {Send-As}    

Total number of users that can SendAs on contact ‘Fekay, Ace’ is 1
*****************************************************************
\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\—-///////////////////////////////
*****************************************************************

Summary

I hope this helps!

Published 3/20/2018

Ace Fekay
MVP, MCT, MCSE 2012, MCITP EA & MCTS Windows 2012|R2, 2008|R2, Exchange 2013|2010EA|2007, MCSE & MCSA 2003/2000, MCSA Messaging 2003
Microsoft Certified Trainer
Microsoft MVP – Directory Services

As many know, I work with Active Directory, Exchange server, and Office 365 engineer/architect, and an MVP in Active Directory and Identity Management, and I’m an MCT as well. I try to strive to perform my job with the best of my ability and efficiency, even when presented with a challenge, and then help others with my findings in case a similar issue arises to help ease their jobs. Share the knowledge, is what I’ve always learned.

I’ve found there are many qualified and very informative websites that provide how-to blogs, and I’m glad they exists and give due credit to the pros that put them together. In some cases when I must research an issue, I just needed something or specific that I couldn’t find or had to piece together from more than one site, such as a simple one-liner or a simple multiline script to perform day to day stuff.

I hope you’ve found this blog post helpful, along with my future scripts blog posts, especially with AD, Exchange, and Office 365.

clip_image0023 clip_image0043 clip_image0063 clip_image0083 clip_image0103 clip_image0123 clip_image0143 clip_image0163

Complete List of Technical Blogs (I may be moving the following site): http://www.delawarecountycomputerconsulting.com/technicalblogs.php

Or just search within my blogs:
https://blogs.msmvps.com/acefekay/

This posting is provided AS-IS with no warranties or guarantees and confers no rights.

Get-UserList

By Ace Fekay
Published 2/21/2018

Intro

Ace here again. I’ve been playing more and more with scripting and well, I’m far from being an expert, but I continue to read up on it, research, and ask lots of questions.

I thought to share this cool function to enumerate a list of sAMAccountNames and email addresses and validate if the account exists. There isn’t anything out there like this at the moment, at least that I could find, which prompted its creation.

Kudos to my colleague Gamal. that helped me with this script.

Scope

Ever had a list of user accounts that you want to run the Exchange PowerShell cmdlet Get-Recipient to list their email addresses and displayNames, etc?

And the list is mixed with sAMAccountNames, email addresses, and displayNames, and worse, there are spaces and empty lines in the list, and further, they include bunch of accounts that don’t exist that give you that awesome (yea right) RED errors on your screen?

And you have to clean up the list first. Isn’t that a pain to clean it up before you run it?

Here’s a quick function to clean up the list, then enumerate and validate the list, reporting in almost any way you like that also tells you which accounts are invalid, without all those errors.

Get-Recipient

I decided to use Get-Recipient because the Get-Mailbox cmdlet won’t work if the account is a MailUser, Contact, or DL.

Quick script to enumerate and count, but without account validation

(Get-content “c:\temp\email-addresses.txt”) | ? {$_.trim() -ne “” } | set-content “c:\temp\user-list.txt”
$File = ((Get-content “c:\temp\user-list.txt”)).Trim()
$File | get-recipient  -Properties PrimarySmtpAddress ,displayName,name  | ft  Name,DisplayName, prim* -A
Write-Host “Total count:” ($file).Count

Script to enumerate and count, with account validation

Copy and paste the following into notepad, and save it as Get-UserList.ps1, and run it to load the function.

#################\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\////////////////#################
# This Function (or script without the Function tag) will:
# 1. Reads a text file with mixed sAMAccountName, DisplayNames,
#     or primary email alias (recommended to not use displayNames)
# 2. Clean up white spaces and empty lines in the list
# 3. Searches and performs a validity check creating a report that
#      indicates active and inactive accounts
#
# Usage: Create a file of sAMAccountNames and email addresses,
# save it as a text file, then run Get-UserList
#
# Credit to my colleague Gamal for helping to create this cool script
#################\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\////////////////#################
Function Get-UserList {

function change-color-red
{
process {Write-Host $_ -ForegroundColor DarkRed}
}
############
$EmailAddressList = “C:\temp\user-list.txt”
$File = ((Get-content $EmailAddressList) | Where-Object {$_.trim() -ne “” }).Trim()

$output = $File | ForEach-Object {

    $exists = if((Get-recipient $_ -erroraction SilentlyContinue)) {
                   Write-Output “Yes”
               }
             else {
                 Write-Output “Does not exist”
             }
     $recipient = Get-Recipient $_ -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue            

    $hash = @{‘Name’ = $_;
               ‘Does-Account-Exist?’ = $exists;
               ‘userID’ = $recipient.SamAccountName
               ‘DisplayName’ = $recipient.DisplayName
               ‘Email’ = $recipient.PrimarySMTPAddress
       }
      
     New-Object psobject -Property $hash
}
Write-Host “******************************************************************************”
$output | ft name,UserId, DisplayName, Email, Does-Account-Exist? -AutoSize | Out-Host
Write-Host “******************************************************************************”
Write-Host “There is/are $(($output).Count) account(s) in the queried user access list.” -ForegroundColor Magenta
Write-Host “Out of the list of users, there is/are $(($output | Where-Object Does-Account-Exist? -EQ ‘Yes’).count) Active account(s).” -ForegroundColor Cyan
Write-Host “Out of the list of users, there is/are $((($output | Where-Object Does-Account-Exist? -EQ ‘Does not exist’) | Measure-Object).count) Inactive account(s).” -ForegroundColor Red
Write-Host “******************************************************************************”
Write-Host “Ref: Part of a Cool Scripts and Functions List! – Ace Fekay”
}
#################////////////////\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\#################

User list file example

As you can see I’ve mixed up the input type. The first.last represents a saMAccountName,”Ace Fekay” represents a displayname, and of course, email addresses.

============================
Smith, John

Ace Fekay
tom.thumb@contoso.com

j.doe
m.smith
============================

If you have displayNames mixed in the file

Keep in mind, if the displayName is not an exact match, it will result in a “Does Not Exist.” In such cases if you need to look them up, add the –anr (for ambiguous name lookup) to the Get-Recipient cmdlet – there are two lines in the script wtih the Get-Recipient. Add –anr to both, as shown below:

$recipient = Get-Recipient -anr $_ -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue

However, if there are multiple similar names, then you won’t get an accurate report. I’d rather just not use it and just create a user list based on either email addresses or sAMAccount names.           

How to run it

Create a list in notepad, save it as a txt file in c:\temp, or anywhere else and reference that in the script, then run:

get-Userlist

=====================

Summary

I hope this helps!

Published 2/21/2018

Ace Fekay
MVP, MCT, MCSE 2012, MCITP EA & MCTS Windows 2012|R2, 2008|R2, Exchange 2013|2010EA|2007, MCSE & MCSA 2003/2000, MCSA Messaging 2003
Microsoft Certified Trainer
Microsoft MVP – Directory Services

As many know, I work with Active Directory, Exchange server, and Office 365 engineer/architect, and an MVP in Active Directory and Identity Management, and I’m an MCT as well. I try to strive to perform my job with the best of my ability and efficiency, even when presented with a challenge, and then help others with my findings in case a similar issue arises to help ease their jobs. Share the knowledge, is what I’ve always learned.

I’ve found there are many qualified and very informative websites that provide how-to blogs, and I’m glad they exists and give due credit to the pros that put them together. In some cases when I must research an issue, I just needed something or specific that I couldn’t find or had to piece together from more than one site, such as a simple one-liner or a simple multiline script to perform day to day stuff.

I hope you’ve found this blog post helpful, along with my future scripts blog posts, especially with AD, Exchange, and Office 365.

clip_image0023 clip_image0043 clip_image0063 clip_image0083 clip_image0103 clip_image0123 clip_image0143 clip_image0163

Complete List of Technical Blogs (I may be moving the following site): http://www.delawarecountycomputerconsulting.com/technicalblogs.php

Or just search within my blogs:
https://blogs.msmvps.com/acefekay/

This posting is provided AS-IS with no warranties or guarantees and confers no rights.


 

Removing Orphaned Populated msExchangeDelegateLinkList and msExchangeDelegateLinkListBL Automapping Attributes

By Ace Fekay
Published 5/11/2017

Scope

How to remove a shared mailbox that keeps showing up in your Outlook profile that you’ve been removed as a delegate.

To add, this is a big stickler especially with migrating from on-premises to Office 365, where the SendAs permission is now changed, because the permission must be re-assigned to the EXO object, the entity actually sending-As the email as another, and not the on-premises AD object. This also discusses how to remove the original Automapped BL (backlink).

Automapping

Automapping is an Autodiscover feature that was added to Exchange 2010 SP1 and newer, that allows Outlook to automatically add a delegated mailbox without additional tasks.

Autodiscover looks at the mailbox owner’s AD account for an attribute called the MSExchDelegateListLink attribute.

When you use the EAC or PowerShell to delegate permissions to a shared mailbox or to another user, Exchange will automatically set the Automapping feature to $True. In PowerShell you can disable this, but not in the EAC.

This feature populates the MSExchDelegateListLink attribute on the shared or delegated mailbox with the user accounts that will be Automapped, and vice-versa, it also populates the MSExchDelegateLinkListBL attribute on the user account. I look at this as the “back link” to the shared mailbox.

These two attributes are one of  nine (9) links and backlinks that exist. Here’s a list of all links and backlinks in AD and more specifics can be found at the following link:
http://www.neroblanco.co.uk/2015/07/links-and-backlinks-in-active-directory-for-exchange/

Outlook, Autodiscover, and those attributes

When Outlook fires up, and while running, part of what Autodiscover process performs is it will check these two attributes to determine if there are any shared mailboxes that must be automatically added to the Outlook profile. In some cases using a managed process for shared mailboxes, we may want this feature disabled so the shared mailbox does not get automatically added.

Orphaned backlink is still populated and the mailbox still shows up in Outlook

If the user was previously delegated to a shared mailbox, then the delegated per,missions were removed, but for some reason, perhaps replication or corruption, or some other unforeseen factor (large environments fall under this category), the shared mailbox still shows up and you can’t get rid of it, and further, since you no longer have permissions, you can’t open it. This will cause the shared or delegated mailbox to still show up in Outlook. But you can clearly see in EAC or running a get-mailboxpermission that the user is no longer delegated.

Example of an account with the msExchDelegateLinkListBL still populated:

image

 

How to remove it?

First, establish your PowerShell session to Exchange onprem or your Office 365 tenant. If unsure how, see this:
https://blogs.msmvps.com/acefekay/2017/05/11/establishing-a-powershell-session-to-your-office-365-tenant-or-onprem-exchange/

Determine, if any, links or backlinks exist on the shared mailbox:

Get-ADUser “SharedMailboxDisplayName” -Properties msExchDelegateListLink | Select-object -ExpandProperty msExchDelegateListLink

If any show up, you’ll see their sAMAccountNames. If you don’t know who the sAMAccountNames are and you want to see their displayNames, run the following (this command works for DNs, too):

For one account:
get-aduser sAMAccountName -Properties displayName,mail  | ft Name, DisplayName, mail -A

For a list of accounts in a text file:
get-content c:\temp\names.txt | get-aduser -Properties displayName,mail  | ft Name, DisplayName, mail –A

 

Then remove the msexchDelegateLinkListBL orphaned backlink:

Note: I’m using the shared mailbox’s displayName. This will also work using the sAMAaccountName or the primary email address.

For one account:
Remove-MailboxPermission “SharedMailboxDisplayName” -user $_ –AccessRights FullAccess -Confirm:$false

For a list of accounts in a text file:
get-content c:\temp\ace\userIDs\users.txt | foreach {Remove-MailboxPermission “SharedMailboxDisplayName”  -user $_ –AccessRights FullAccess -Confirm:$false}

Then if needed, delegate the shared mailbox again & disabling Automapping

Delegate Ace to a shared mailbox:
Add-MailboxPermission “Shared Mailbox Name or email address” -User AceFekay@contoso.com -AccessRights FullAccess -AutoMapping:$false

 

============================================================

Summary

I hope this helps!

Published 5/18/2017

Ace Fekay
MVP, MCT, MCSE 2012, MCITP EA & MCTS Windows 2008/R2, Exchange 2013, 2010 EA & 2007, MCSE & MCSA 2003/2000, MCSA Messaging 2003
Microsoft Certified Trainer
Microsoft MVP – Directory Services

As many know, I work with Active Directory, Exchange server, and Office 365 engineer/architect, and an MVP in Active Directory and Identity Management, and I’m an MCT as well. I try to strive to perform my job with the best of my ability and efficiency, even when presented with a challenge, and then help others with my findings in case a similar issue arises to help ease their jobs. Share the knowledge, is what I’ve always learned.

I’ve found there are many qualified and very informative websites that provide how-to blogs, and I’m glad they exists and give due credit to the pros that put them together. In some cases when I must research an issue, I just needed something or specific that I couldn’t find or had to piece together from more than one site, such as a simple one-liner or a simple multiline script to perform day to day stuff.

I hope you’ve found this blog post helpful, along with my future scripts blog posts, especially with AD, Exchange, and Office 365.

 

clip_image0023 clip_image0043 clip_image0063 clip_image0083 clip_image0103 clip_image0123 clip_image0143 clip_image0163

Complete List of Technical Blogs: http://www.delawarecountycomputerconsulting.com/technicalblogs.php

Or just search within my blogs:
https://blogs.msmvps.com/acefekay/

This posting is provided AS-IS with no warranties or guarantees and confers no rights.


Establishing a PowerShell Session to Your Office 365 Tenant or OnPrem Exchange

By Ace Fekay
Published 5/11/2017

Prelude

I’m working on posting more scripting blogs managing Active Directory, Office 365, and Exchange OnPrem, or On Premises.

And I stress the phrase, “On Premises,” and NOT “On Premise!”

Scope

Instead of repeating this procedure in each blog I write that has something to do about scripting where you must connect a PowerShell or an ISE session (I’d rather use ISE) to the tenant or OnPrem box, I thought to just put this together and reference the URL to connect. It’s easier and takes up less space on the blog with the actuals PS commands and scripts.

Office 365 tenant without ADFS

If you are not using multifactor auth or ADFS, open a PowerShell window and the run the following:

$MySession = New-PSSession -ConfigurationName Microsoft.Exchange -ConnectionUri https://ps.outlook.com/powershell/ -Credential $YourCred -Authentication Basic –AllowRedirection

This will prompt you for your credentials. Then import the session you just created:
import-pssession $MySession

If using a Proxy:

$MySession = New-PSSession -ConfigurationName Microsoft.Exchange –ConnectionUri https://ps.outlook.com/powershell/ -Credential $YourCred -Authentication Basic –AllowRedirection (New-PSSessionOption -ProxyAccessType IE)

This will prompt you for your credentials. Then import the session you just created:
import-pssession $MySession

Import AD Module:

I always import the Active Directory module so I can run AD tools. Of course, you will need AD permissions to modify, but anyone can read properties:

Import-module ActiveDirectory

.

Office 365 ADFS and/or Multifactor Auth

Go to http://aka.ms/exopspreview. It will open and create a PowerShell session specifically to assist with establishing a session with Office 365. Then run the following:

Connect-EXOPSSession -UserPrincipalName YourEmail@contoso.com -PSSessionOption

If using a Proxy:

Connect-EXOPSSession -UserPrincipalName YourUserNamea@contoso.com -PSSessionOption (New-PSSessionOption -ProxyAccessType IE)

Import the AD Module:

I always import the Active Directory module so I can run AD tools. Of course, you will need AD permissions to modify, but anyone can read properties:

Import-module ActiveDirectory

.

Exchange OnPrem

$Session = New-PSSession -ConfigurationName Microsoft.Exchange -ConnectionUri http://Exchange02.contoso.local/PowerShell/ -Authentication Kerberos
Import-PSSession $Session
Add-PSSnapin Microsoft.Exchange.Management.Powershell.Support

Import the AD Module:

I always import the Active Directory module so I can run AD tools. Of course, you will need AD permissions to modify, but anyone can read properties:

Import-module ActiveDirectory

.

============================================================

Summary

I hope this helps!

Published 5/11/2017

Ace Fekay
MVP, MCT, MCSE 2012, MCITP EA & MCTS Windows 2008/R2, Exchange 2013, 2010 EA & 2007, MCSE & MCSA 2003/2000, MCSA Messaging 2003
Microsoft Certified Trainer
Microsoft MVP – Directory Services

clip_image0023 clip_image0043 clip_image0063 clip_image0083 clip_image0103 clip_image0123 clip_image0143 clip_image0163

Complete List of Technical Blogs: http://www.delawarecountycomputerconsulting.com/technicalblogs.php

Or just search within my blogs:
https://blogs.msmvps.com/acefekay/

This posting is provided AS-IS with no warranties or guarantees and confers no rights.

Active Directory Trusts

Published 11/2016
Recompiled 3/2018

Intro

AD Trusts have always been confusing to many, such as, which direction does the trust point? I’ve included an easy to understand analogy that uses you and a friend as an example. I hope this helps. Ping me if you have any questions.

Scope

Let’s discuss AD trusts. And further in, after we discuss trusts types, we’ll revisit Kerberos authentication across a trust path, which I’ve previously discussed in the following blog and is pertinent in the scope of explaining trusts:

Active Directory Trusts

Active Directory domain to domain communications occur through a trust. An AD DS trust is a secured, authentication communication channel between entities, such as AD DS domains, forests, and UNIX realms. Trusts enable you to grant access to resources to users, groups and computers across entities.

The way a trust works is similar to allowing a trusted entity to access your own resources. It’s a two-step process. The first step is to establish the trust. The second step is to provide permissions.

For example, if users in the Contoso.com domain require access to a shared folder in the Trimagna.com domain, and the two domains are not in the same forest, you would establish the trust where Trimagna.com trusts Contoso.com, therefore the direction of the arrow would be Trimagna.com points to Contoso.com.

image

For an analogy, if you were to give your car keys to a friend to allow him or her to use your car, you are establishing a trust between you and your friend. In this case, you are the trusting friend, or domain, and the friend is the trusted friend, or domain. Once the keys have been provided, then the next step is to allow access to your resource, or car, by providing permissions to use the car. However, this trust is only in one direction, you trust your friend. If you want your friend to trust you, your friend, or the other domain, must be initiated by your friend, or the other domain.

AD DS Trust Types

There are various trust types. The trust that you create must be appropriate for the design. Trusts can be transitive or non-transitive. The one that you choose to create depends on the scenario and requirements. Other trusts types can be created as required, depending on the scenario. The table below shows the various trust types you can create.

Trusts can be created using the New Trust Wizard found in the Active Directory Domains and Trusts console, or using the Netdom command line utility. If you choose to create one of the one-way trust types in both directions, it can be created simultaneously, or separately. If you create it separately, you must re-run the procedure to establish the trust in the other direction.

image

Trust Type Characteristics Direction Authentication
Mechanism
Notes
Parent-Child Transitive Two-way Kerberos V5
or NTLM
Created automatically when a child domain is added.
Tree-Root Transitive Two-way Kerberos V5
or NTLM
Created automatically when a new Tree is added to a forest.
Shortcut Transitive One-way
or
Two-way
Kerberos V5
or NTLM
Created Manually.
Used in an AD DS forest to shorten the trust path to improve authentication times.
Forest Transitive One-way
or
Two-way
Kerberos V5
or NTLM
Created Manually.
Used to share resources between AD DS forests.
External Non-transitive One-way NTLM Only Created Manually.
Used to access resources in an NT 4.0 domain or a domain in another forest that does not have a forest trust established.
Realm Transitive or non-transitive One-way
or
Two-way
Kerberos V5 Only Created Manually.
Used to access resources between a non-Windows Kerberos V5 realm and an AD DS domain.

Trust Flow: Transitive vs. Non-Transitive

Trust communication flow is determined by the direction of the trust. The trust can be a one-way or a two-way trust. And the transitivity determines whether a trust can be extended beyond the two domains with which it was formed. A transitive trust can be used to extend trust relationships with other domains; a non-transitive trust can be used to deny trust relationships with other domains. Authentication requests follow a trust path. The transitivity of the trust will affect the trust path.

Transitive Trust

· Contoso.com trusts Trimagna.com.

· Contoso.com trusts Adatum.com.

· Therefore, Trimagna.com trusts Adatum.com.

One-way Trust

· Domain A trusts Domain B, but Domain B does not trust Domain A.

· Domain A trusts Domain C, but Domain C does not trust Domain A.

· Therefore, Domain B does not trust Domain C.

o For these two domains to trust each other, you would need a one way trust created between each other.

Automatic Trusts: and Tree-Root Trusts

By default, two-way, transitive trusts are created automatically when a child domain is added or when a domain tree is added. The two default trust types are parent-child trusts and tree-root trusts.

Parent-Child Trust

A transitive, two-way parent-child trust relationship automatically created and establishes a relationship between a parent domain and a child domain whenever a new child domain is created using the AD DS installation process process within a domain tree. They can only exist between two domains in the same tree with the same contiguous namespace. The parent domain is always trusted by the child domain. You cannot manually create a Parent-Child trust.

image

Tree-Root Trust

A transitive, two-way tree-root trust relationship automatically created and establishes a relationship between the forest root domain and a new tree, when you run the AD DS installation process to add a new tree to the forest. A tree-root trust can only be established between the roots of two trees in the same forest and are always transitive. You cannot manually create a tree-root trust.

image

Shortcut Trust

Shortcut trusts are manually created, one-way, transitive trusts. They can only exist within a forest. They are created to optimize the authentication process shortening the trust path. The trust path is the series of domain trust relationships that the authentication process must traverse between two domains in a forest that are not directly trusted by each other. Shortcut trusts shorten the trust path.

image

Forest Trust

Forest trusts are manually created, one-way transitive, or two-way transitive trusts that allow you to provide access to resources between multiple forests. Forest trusts uses both Kerberos v5 and NTLM authentication across forests where users can use their Universal Principal Name (UPN) or their Pre-Windows 2000 method (domainName\username). Kerberos v5 is attempted first, and if that fails, it will then try NTLM.

image

Forest trusts require DNS resolution to be established between forests, however to support NTLM failback, you must also provide NetBIOS name resolution support between the forests.

Forest trusts also provide SID filtering enforcement in Windows Server 2003 and newer. This ensures that any misuse of the SID history attribute on security principals (including the inetOrgPerson attribute) in the trusted forest cannot pose a threat to the integrity of the trusting forest.

Forest trusts cannot be extended to other forests, such as if Forest 1 trusts Forest 2, and another forest trust is created between Forest 2 and Forest 3, Forest 1 does not have an implied trust. If a trust is required, one must be manually created.

External Trust

An external trust is a one-way, non-transitive trust that is manually created to establish a trust relationship between AD DS domains that are in different forests, or between an AD DS domain and Windows NT 4.0 domain. External trusts allow you to provide users access to resources in a domain outside of the forest that is not already trusted by a Forest trust.

image

SID filter quarantining is enabled by default with Windows Server 2003 and newer AD DS domains. SID filtering verifies that incoming authentication requests made from security principals in the trusted domain contain only SIDs of security principals from the trusted domain.

External trusts are NTLM based, meaning users must authenticate using the Pre-Windows 2000 logon method (domain\username).NTLM requires NetBIOS name resolution support for functionality.

Additional reading on creating External Trusts and DNS Support:

Realm Trust

A Realm trust can be established to provide resource access and cross-platform inter-operability between an AD DS domain and non-Windows Kerberos v5 Realm.

  • A Realm trust only uses Kerberos V5 authentication. NTLM is not used.
  • When the direction of the trust is from a non-Windows Kerberos Realm to an AD DS domain (Realm trusts AD DS domain), the non-Windows realm trusts all security principals in the AD DS domain.
  • Realm trusts are one-way by default, but you can create a trust in the other direction to allow two-way access.
  • Because non-Windows Kerberos tickets do not contain all the information AD DS requires, the AD DS domain only uses the account to which the proxy account (the non-Windows principal) is mapped to evaluate access requests and authorization. With Realm trusts, all AD DS domain proxy accounts can be used in an AD DS group in ACLs to control access for non-Windows accounts.

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Additional reading:

Trusted Domain Object (TDO)

To understand cross domain authentication, we must first understand Trusted Domain Objects (TDOs). Each domain within a forest is represented by a TDO that is stored in the System container within its domain. The information in the TDO varies depending on whether the TDO was created by a domain trust or by a forest trust.

When a domain trust is created, attributes such as the DNS domain name, domain SID, trust type, trust transitivity, and the reciprocal domain name are represented in the TDO.

When a forest trust is first established, each forest collects all of the trusted namespaces in its partner forest and then stores the information in a TDO. The trusted namespaces and attributes that are stored in the TDO include domain tree names, child domain names, user principal name (UPN) suffixes, service principal name (SPN) suffixes, and security ID (SID) namespaces used in the other forest. TDO objects are stored in each domain, then replicated to the global catalog.

Therefore, because trusts are stored in Active Directory in the global catalog as TDOs, all domains in a forest have knowledge of the trust relationships that are in place throughout the forest. If there are two or more forests that are joined together through forest trusts, the forest root domains in each forest know of the trust relationships throughout all of the domains in the trusted forests.

The only exception to the rule is External trusts to a Windows NT 4.0 domain do not create TDOs in Active Directory because it is NTLM based, in which SPN and domain SIDs do not exist, therefore do not apply.

Additional reading:

Trust Path between Domains

The trust path is the series of domain trust relationships that the authentication process must traverse between two domains in a forest that are not directly trusted by each other.

Before authentication for a user, computer or service can occur across trusts, Windows must determine if the domain being requested has a trust relationship with the requesting account’s logon domain. This is determined by quering the global catalog for TDO data. The Windows security system’s Netlgon service through an authenticated RPC (Remote Procedure Call) to the remote domain’s trusted domain authority, (the remote domain controller), computes a trust path between the domain controller for the server that receives the request and a domain controller in the domain of the requesting account.

The Windows security system extends a secured channel to other Active Directory domains through interdomain trust relationships. This secured channel is used to obtain and verify security information, including security identifiers (SIDs) for users and groups. The trust path is stored for authentication requests to the trusted domain.

Kerberos authentication Sequence between Domains in a Forest

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A user in the marketing.trimagna.com domains needs to gain access to a file share on a server called fileserver.sales.contoso.com domain. This is assuming the User has already logged on to a workstation using credentials from the marketing.trimagna.com domain. As part of the logon process, the authenticating domain controller issues the User a ticket-granting ticket (TGT). This ticket is required for User1 to be authenticated to resources.

The User attempts to access a shared resource on \\FileServer.sales.contoso.com\share.

The following Kerberos V5 authentication process occurs:

1. The User’s workstation asks for a session ticket for the FileServer server in sales.contoso.com by contacting the Kerberos Key Distribution Center (KDC) on a domain controller in its domain (ChildDC1) and requests a service ticket for the FileServer.sales.contoso.com service principal name (SPN).

2. The KDC in the user’s domain (marketing.trimagna.com) does not find the SPN for FileServer.sales.contoso.com in its domain database and queries the GC to see if any domains in the forest contain this SPN.

a. The GC checks its database about all forest trusts that exist in its forest. If a trust to the target domain is found, it compares the name suffixes listed in the forest trust trusted domain objects (TDOs) to the suffix of the target SPN to find a match.

b. Once a match is found, the global catalog sends the requested information as a referral back to the KDC in marketing.trimagna.com.

3. The KDC in the marketing.trimagna.com then issues the workstation a TGT for the contoso.com domain. This is known as a referral ticket.

4. The workstation then contacts the KDC in the trimagna.com tree root domain to request a referral to the KDC in the sales.contoso.com.

5. The KDC in the trimagna.com domain recognizes the user’s request to establish a session with a resource that exists in a foreign domain’s server.

a. The KDC then issues a TGT for the KDC in the contoso.com domain.

6. The workstation then presents the TGT for the sales.contoso.com domain to the KDC in the contoso.com domain.

7. The contoso.com KDC queries a GC to see if any domains in the forest contain this SPN. The GC checks its database about all forest trusts that exist in its forest. If a trust to the target domain is found, it compares the name suffixes listed in the forest trust trusted domain objects (TDOs) to the suffix of the target SPN to find a match.

a. Once a match is found, the global catalog sends the requested information as a referral back to the KDC in contoso.com.

8. The KDC issues a TGT for the sales.contoso.com domain.

9. The workstation then contacts the KDC of the sales.contoso.com domain and presents the referral ticket it received from its own KDC.

a. The referral ticket is encrypted with the interdomain key that is decrypted by the foreign domain’s TGS.

b. Note: When there is a trust established between two domains, an interdomain key based on the trust password becomes available for authenticating KDC functions, therefore it’s used to encrypt and decrypt tickets.

10. The workstation also presents the KDC in the sales.contoso.com the TGT it received from the KDC in contoso.com for the sales.contoso.com domain and is issued a ST (Session Ticket) for the sales.contoso.com domain.

a. The ST is populated with the domain local group memberships from the sales.contoso.com domain.

11. The user presents FileServer.sales.contoso.com the ST to the server to gain access to resources on the server in sales.contoso.com.

12. The server, FileServer.sales.contoso.com compares the SIDs include in the session ticket to the ACEs on the requested resource to determine if the user is authorized to access the resource. If there is, the user is permitted to access the resource based on the ACL permissions.

Kerberos Authentication with a Shortcut Trust

If a shortcut trust exists from the sales.contoso.com domain to the marketing.trimagna.com domain, then the trust path will shortened, therefore the user authentication path will be direct between the two domains.

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Additional Reading

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Ace Fekay
MVP, MCT, MCSE 2012, MCITP EA & MCTS Windows 2008/R2, Exchange 2013, 2010 EA & 2007, MCSE & MCSA 2003/2000, MCSA Messaging 2003
Microsoft Certified Trainer
Microsoft MVP – Directory Services

 

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Complete List of Technical Blogs: http://www.delawarecountycomputerconsulting.com/technicalblogs.php

This posting is provided AS-IS with no warranties or guarantees and confers no rights.

Active Directory Flexible Authentication Secure Tunneling (FAST)

Let’s discuss Flexible Authentication Secure Tunneling (FAST).

This new feature implemented in the Windows Server 2012 KDC, provides protection against password-based dictionary attacks. FAST is an extra level of security above password lockout policies and works at the Kerberos authentication level.

What is FAST and Kerberos Armoring?

Sometimes referred to as one in the same, FAST provides offline dictionary attack prevention, that work around Kerberos errors being spoofed. If the Kerberos authentication sequence fails, authentication falls back to NTLM authentication, a less secure method.

FAST is defined by RFC 6113 and RFC 4851, to prevent spoofing Kerberos errors. FAST is also referred to as Kerberos Armoring. FAST provides a secured and protected channel to provide a protected channel between a domain-joined client and DC and involves the LSA (Local Security Authority), the Netlogon Service, and the KDC. FAST protects Kerberos pre-authentication data for the “AS_REQ” by using the LSK (randomly generated logon session key) from the TGT (Ticket Granting Ticket during the Kerberos authentication sequence) as a shared secret to fully encrypt Kerberos messages and sign all possible Kerberos errors. The shared secret provides an additional “salt” in the Kerberos authentication process. This results in increased processing time, but it does not change the Kerberos service ticket size. The shared secret provides DCs the ability to return Kerberos authentication errors, which in turn, protects against spoofing, man-in-the middle, and other attacks.

FAST and Windows Server 2008

Although Windows Server 2012 and newer domain controllers are required to support this feature, there are no requirements for the domain or forest functional levels to be at Windows Server 2012. Therefore, you can have Windows Server 2008 and Windows Server 2008 R2 domain controllers, with forest functional level on Windows Server 2008.

The only exception is if you are implementing claims across a forest trust.

FAST requirements

  • Functional levels must be at least Windows Server 2008.
  • For full support, Domain and Forest Functional Levels must be at Windows Server 2012, which means that all domain controllers must be at least Windows Server 2012.
  • The Active Directory Domain must support Claims Based Access Control (CBAC) and Kerberos Armoring policy for all Windows Server 2012 domain controllers.
  • CBAC is an authorization method granting or denying access based on an arbitrary authorization decision algorithm using data in claims.

Additional Reading on CBAC:
Authorization in Claims-Aware Web Applications and Services
http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windowsazure/gg185915.aspx

The domain can be configured either to require Kerberos armoring, or use it upon request. This allows backward support for legacy clients.This can be enabled by using two Group Policy settings:

  • “Support CBAC and Kerberos armoring”
  • “All DCs can support CBAC and Require Kerberos Armoring”

Additional Reading

What’s New in Kerberos Authentication?
http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/hh831747.aspx

The Flexible Authentication via Secure Tunneling Extensible Authentication Protocol Method (EAP-FAST)
http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc4851

A Generalized Framework for Kerberos Pre-Authentication
http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc6113

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Summary

Stay tuned. This is part of a release of previously unreleased documentation.

Ace Fekay
MVP, MCT, MCSE 2012, MCITP EA & MCTS Windows 2008/R2, Exchange 2013, 2010 EA & 2007, MCSE & MCSA 2003/2000, MCSA Messaging 2003
Microsoft Certified Trainer
Microsoft MVP – Directory Services

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Complete List of Technical Blogs: http://www.delawarecountycomputerconsulting.com/technicalblogs.php

This posting is provided AS-IS with no warranties or guarantees and confers no rights.