DRM – safe for work, but please not at home. – Tales from the Crypto

DRM – safe for work, but please not at home.

Here’s a theme you’ll have heard from me a dozen times if you’ve been following my Usenet traffic:


“When I buy software, or music, or videos, I want to buy the content, not just the plastic it comes on.”


What do I mean by this?


Simply that I don’t want to find myself restricted as to what I can do with the software, music, videos, etc.  If I buy a DVD, I want to be able to watch it on my choice of device, in my choice of country, and (if necessary) in my choice of format.


With the recent news of Sony’s unpleasant intrusion into home computers (or this link for an American version), it’s a reminder for me to say this again – my computer is my computer, and I’ll thank you – any of you – to leave me to decide and actively accept what software to install on it.


Yes, Sony may include a licence on their CDs – but who reads them?  Who even expects that an audio CD (not a software title) will install software on their machine?


The key point to my mind is that I, the system administrator on my home computer, cannot hope to maintain the security and reliability of my system if I cannot know when software is installed, and be able to remove what software I choose to no longer be there.  If Mark Russinovich, a hugely capable developer, cannot remove the software from his system without losing access to parts of his system, what hope do the rest of us have?


Digital Rights Management, or DRM, is frequently put forward by music companies as the next best thing since sliced bread.  It’s not, and it’s not even remotely appropriate for home use, or for preventing privacy.


DRM works in exactly one scenario: when the owner of the rights also controls the behaviour of those subject to DRM.  That almost always means “work”, where the rights owner can discipline, and eventually terminate, those that refuse to respect the DRM restrictions on content.  To attempt to apply it to home use, where there is no such control, is to ignore that basic limitation of DRM.


And, quite frankly, it’s insulting.  I don’t feel like pulling out the “innocent until proven guilty” argument in its entirety, but as a legal and honest purchaser of all manner of electronic content, I feel insulted that I am then limited as to my use – not merely limited as to illegal copying and distribution, but limited as to what should be legal – copying for my own use in different devices.


I believe in this so strongly that I have made sure that the software I sell is controlled by those who pay for it.  You can move our software from one machine to another, and we ask only that you use no more copies than you have paid for.  We assume that we can trust our legitimate customers.  We put a few limits into the freely-distributed version, only because if we don’t, nobody buys (trust us, we’ve tried).  Even the honest need a few reminders some times.

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