Got on with Git

In which I move my version control from ComponentSoftware’s CS-RCS Pro to Git while preserving commit history.

[If you don’t want the back story, click here for the instructions!]

OK, so having watched the video I linked to earlier, I thought I’d move some of my old projects to Git.

I picked one at random, and went looking for tools.

I’m hampered a little by the fact that all my old projects used ComponentSoftware’s “CS-RCS Pro”.

Why did you choose CS-RCS Pro?

A couple of really good reasons:

  • It works on Windows
  • It integrates moderately well with Visual Studio through the VSS functionality
  • It’s compatible with GNU RCS, which I had some familiarity with
  • It was free if you’re the only dev on your projects

But you know who doesn’t use CS-RCS Pro any more?

That’s right, ComponentSoftware.

It’s a dead platform, unsupported, unpatched, and belongs off my systems.

So why’s it still there?

One simple reason – if I move off the platform, I face the usual choice when migrating from one version control system to another:

  • Carry all my history, so that I can review earlier versions of the code (for instance, when someone says they’ve got a new bug that never happened in the old version, or when I find a reversion, or when there’s a fix needed in one area of the code tree that I know I already made in a different area and just need to copy)
  • Lose all the history by starting fresh with the working copy of the source code

The second option seems a bit of a waste to me.

OK, so yes, technically I could mix the two modes, by using CS-RCS Pro to browse the ancient history when I need to, and Git to browse recent history, after starting Git from a clean working folder. But I could see a couple of problems:

  • Of course the bug I’m looking through history for is going to be across the two source control packages
  • It would mean I still have CS-RCS Pro sitting around installed, unpatched and likely vulnerable, on one of my dev systems

So, really, I wanted to make sure that I could move my files, history and all.

What stopped you?

I really didn’t have a good way to do it.

Clearly, any version control system can be moved to any other version control system by the simple expedient of:

  • For each change X:
    • Set the system date to X’s date
    • Fetch the old source control’s files from X into the workspace
    • Commit changes to the new source control, with any comments from X
    • Next change

But, as you can imagine, that’s really long-winded and manual. That should be automatable.

In fact, given the shared APIs of VSS-compatible source control services, I’m truly surprised that nobody has yet written a tool to do basically this task. I’d get on it myself, but I have other things to do. Maybe someone will write a “VSS2Git” or “VSS2VSS” toolkit to do just this.

There is a format for creating a single-file copy of a Git repository, which Git can process using the command “git fast-import”. So all I have to find is a tool that goes from a CS-RCS repository to the fast-import file format.

Nobody uses CS-RCS Pro

So, clearly there’s no tool to go from CS-RCS Pro to Git. There’s a tool to go from CS-RCS Pro to CVS, or there was, but that was on the now-defunct CS-RCS web site.

But… Remember I said that it’s compatible with GNU RCS.

And there’s scripts to go from GNU RCS to Git.

What you waiting for? Do it!

OK, so the script for this is written in Ruby, and as I read it, there seemed to be a few things that made it look like it might be for Linux only.

I really wasn’t interested in making a Linux VM (easy though that may be) just so I could convert my data.

So why are you writing this?

Everything changed with the arrival of the recent Windows 10 Anniversary Update, because along with it came a new component.

bashonubu

Bash on Ubuntu on Windows.

It’s like a Linux VM, without needing a VM, without having to install Linux, and it works really well.

With this, I could get all the tools I needed – GNU RCS, in case I needed it; Ruby; Git command line – and then I could try this out for myself.

Of course, I wouldn’t be publishing this if it wasn’t somewhat successful. But there are some caveats, OK?

Here’s the caveats

I’ve tried this a few times, on ONE of my own projects. This isn’t robustly tested, so if something goes all wrong, please by all means share, and people who are interested (maybe me) will probably offer suggestions, some of them useful. I’m not remotely warrantying this or suggesting it’s perfect. It may wipe your development history out of your one and only copy of version control… so don’t do it on your one and only copy. Make a backup first.

GNU RCS likes to store files in one of two places – either in the same directory as the working files, but with a “,v” pseudo-extension added to the filename, or in a sub-directory off each working folder, called “RCS” and with the same “,v” extension on the files. If you did either of these things, there’s no surprises. But…

CS-RCS Pro doesn’t do this. It has a separate RCS Repository Root. I put mine in C:\RCS, but you may have yours somewhere else. Underneath that RCS Repository Root is a full tree of the drives you’ve used CS-RCS to store (without the “:”), and a tree under that. I really hope you didn’t embed anything too deep, because that might bode ill.

Initially, this seemed like a bad thing, but because you don’t actually need the working files for this task, you can pretend that the RCS Repository is actually your working space.

Maybe this is obvious, but it took me a moment of thinking to decide I didn’t have to move files into RCS sub-folders of my working directories.

Make this a “flag day”. After you do this conversion, never use CS-RCS Pro again. It was good, and it did the job, and it’s now buried in the garden next to Old Yeller. Do not sprinkle the zombification water on that hallowed ground to revive it.

This also means you MUST check in all your code before converting, because checking it in afterwards will be … difficult.

Enough already, how do we do this?

Assumption: You have Windows 10.

  1. Install Windows 10 Anniversary Update – this is really easy, it’s an update, you’ve probably been offered it already, and you may even have installed it. This is how you’ll know you have it:
    capture20160826194922505
  2. Install Bash on Ubuntu on Windows – everyone else has written an article on how to do this, so here’s a link (I was going to link to the PC World article, but the full-page ad that popped up and obscured the screen, without letting me click the “no thanks” button persuaded me otherwise).
  3. Run the following commands in the bash shell:
    sudo apt-get update
    sudo apt-get install git
    sudo apt-get install ruby
  4. [Optional] Run “sudo apt-get instal rcs”, if you want to use the GNU RCS toolset to play with your original source control tree. Not sure I’d recommend doing too much of that.
  5. Change directory in the bash shell to a new, blank workspace folder you can afford to mess around in.
  6. Now a long bash command, but this really simply downloads the file containing rcs-fast-export:
    curl http://git.oblomov.eu/rcs-fast-export/blob_plain/c8a2bd6edbb21c1bfaf269ad1ec0e82af72c911a:/rcs-fast-export.rb -o rcs-fast-export.rb
  7. Make it executable with the command “chmod +x rcs-fast-export.rb”
  8. Git uses email addresses, rather than owner names, and it insists on them having angle brackets. If your username in CS-RCS Pro was “bob”, and your email address is “kate@example.com”, create an authors file with a bash command like this:
    echo “bob=Kate Smith <kate@example.com>” > AuthorsFile
  9. Now do the actual creation of the file to be imported, with this bash command:
    ./rcs-fast-export.rb -A AuthorsFile /mnt/c/RCS/…path-to-project… > project-name.gitexport
    [Note a couple of things here – starting with “./”, because that isn’t automatically in the PATH in Linux. Your Windows files are logically mounted in drives under /mnt, so C:\RCS is in /mnt/c/RCS. Case is important. Your “…path-to-project…” probably starts with “c/”, so that’s going to look like “/mnt/c/RCS/c/…” which might look awkward, but is correct. Use TAB-completion on folder names to help you.]
  10. Read the errors and correct any interesting ones.
  11. Now import the file into Git. We’re going to initialise a Git repository in the “.git” folder under the current folder, import the file, reset the head, and finally checkout all the files into the “master” branch under the current directory “.”. These are the bash commands to do this:
    git init
    git fast-import < project-name.gitexport
    git reset
    git checkout master .
  12. Profit!
  13. If you’re using Visual Studio and want to connect to this Git repository, remember that your Linux home directory sits under “%userprofile%\appdata\local\lxss\home”

This might look like a lot of instructions, but I mostly just wanted to be clear. This is really quick work. If you screw up after the “git init” command, simply “rm –rf .git” to remove the new repository.

Untrusting the Blue Coat Intermediate CA from Windows

So, there was this tweet that got passed around the security community pretty quickly:

Kind of confusing and scary if you’re not quite sure what this all means – perhaps clear and scary if you do.

BlueCoat manufactures “man in the middle” devices – sometimes used by enterprises to scan and inspect / block outbound traffic across their network, and apparently also used by governments to scan and inspect traffic across the network.

The first use is somewhat acceptable (enterprises can prevent their users from distributing viruses or engaging in illicit behaviour from work computers, which the enterprises quite rightly believe they own and should control), but the second use is generally not acceptable, depending on how much you trust your local government.

Filippo helpfully gives instructions on blocking this from OSX, and a few people in the Twitter conversation have asked how to do this on Windows.

Disclaimer!

Don’t do this on a machine you don’t own or manage – you may very well be interfering with legitimate interference in your network traffic. If you’re at work, your employer owns your computer, and may intercept, read and modify your network traffic, subject to local laws, because it’s their network and their computer. If your government has ruled that they have the same rights to intercept Internet traffic throughout your country, you may want to consider whether your government shouldn’t be busy doing other things like picking up litter and contributing to world peace.

The simple Windows way

As with most things on Windows, there’s multiple ways to do this. Here’s one, which can be followed either by regular users or administrators. It’s several steps, but it’s a logical progression, and will work for everyone.

Step 1. Download the certificate. Really, literally, follow the link to the certificate and click “Open”. It’ll pop up as follows:

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Step 2. Install the certificate. Really, literally, click the button that says “Install Certificate…”. You’ll see this prompt asking you where to save it:

5-26-2016 3-49-41 PM

Step 3. If you’re a non-administrator, and just want to untrust this certificate for yourself, leave the Store Location set to “Current User”. If you want to set this for the machine as a whole, and you’re an administrator, select Local Machine, like this:

5-26-2016 3-49-50 PM

Step 4: Click Next, to be asked where you’re putting the certificate:

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Step 5: Select “Place all certificates in the following store”:

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Step 6: Click the “Browse…” button to be given choices of where to place this certificate:

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Step 7: Don’t select “Personal”, because that will explicitly trust the certificate. Scroll down and you’ll see “Untrusted Certificates”. Select that and hit OK:

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Step 8: You’re shown the store you plan to install into:

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Step 9: Click “Next” – and you’ll get a final confirmation option. Read the screen and make sure you really want to do what’s being offered – it’s reversible, but check that you didn’t accidentally install the certificate somewhere wrong. The only place this certificate should go to become untrusted is in the Untrusted Certificates store:

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Step 10: Once you’re sure you have it right, click “Finish”. You’ll be congratulated with this prompt:

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Step 11: Verification. Hit OK on the “import was successful” box. If you still have the Certificate open, close it. Now reopen it, from the link or from the certificate store, or if you downloaded the certificate, from there. It’ll look like this:

5-26-2016 3-51-44 PM

The certificate hasn’t actually been revoked, and you can open up the Untrusted Certificates store to remove this certificate so it’s trusted again if you find any difficulties.

Other methods

There are other methods to do this – if you’re a regular admin user on Windows, I’ll tell you the quicker way is to open MMC.EXE, add the Certificates Snap-in, select to manage either the Local Computer or Current User, navigate to the Untrusted Certificates store and Import the certificate there. For wide scale deployment, there are group policy ways to do this, too.

OK, OK, because you asked, here’s a picture of how to do it by GPO:

5-26-2016 4-49-38 PM

Auto convert inked shapes in PowerPoint–coming to OneNote

I happened upon a blog post by the Office team yesterday which surprised me, because it talked about a feature in PowerPoint that I’ve wanted ever since I first got my Surface 2.

Shape recognition

Here’s a link to documentation on how to use this feature in PowerPoint.

https://support.office.com/en-us/article/use-a-pen-to-draw-write-or-highlight-text-on-a-windows-tablet-6d76c674-7f4b-414d-b67f-b3ffef6ccf53

It seems like the obvious feature a tablet should have.

Here’s a video of me using it to draw a few random shapes:

But not just in PowerPoint – this should be in Word, in OneNote, in Paint, and pretty much any app that accepts ink.

And at last, OneNote

So here’s the blog post from Office noting that this feature will finally be available for OneNote in November.

https://blogs.office.com/2015/10/20/onenote-partners-with-fiftythree-to-support-pencil-and-paper-plus-shape-recognition-coming-soon/

On iPad, iPhone and Windows 10. Which I presume means it’ll only be on the Windows Store / Metro / Modern / Immersive version of OneNote.

That’s disappointing, because it should really be in every Office app. Hell, I’d update from Office 2013 tomorrow if this was a feature in Office 2016!

Let’s not stop there

Please, Microsoft, don’t stop at the Windows Store version of OneNote.

Shape recognition, along with handwriting recognition (which is apparently also hard), should be a natural part of my use of the Surface Pen. It should work the same across multiple apps.

That’s only going to happen if it’s present in multiple apps, and is a documented API which developers – of desktop apps as well as Store apps – can call into.

Well, desktop apps can definitely get that.

How can I put it into my own app?

I’ll admit that I haven’t had the time yet to build my own sample, but I’m hoping that this still works – there’s an API called “Ink Analysis”, which is exactly how you would achieve this in your app:

https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms704040.aspx

It allows you to analyse ink you’ve captured, and decide if it’s text or a drawing, and if it’s a drawing, what kind of drawing it might be.

[I’ve marked this with the tag “Alun’s Code” because I want to write a sample eventually that demonstrates this function.]

Windows 10 – first impressions

I’ve updated from Windows 8.1 to Windows 10 Enterprise Insider Preview over this weekend, on my Surface Pro 3 and a Lenovo tablet. Both machines are used for software development as well as playing games, so seemed the ideal place to practice.

So here’s some initial impressions:

1. VPN still not working properly

I’ve mentioned before (ranted, perhaps) about how the VPN support in Windows 8.1 is great for desktop apps, but broken for Metro / Modern / Immersive / Windows Store apps.

Still, maybe now I’m able to provide feedback, and Windows is in a beta test phase, perhaps they’ll pay attention and fix the bugs.

2. Stuff crashes

It’s a beta, but just in case you were persuaded to install this on a production system, it’s still not release quality.

Every so often, the Edge browser (currently calling itself “Project Spartan”) will just die on you.

I’ve managed to get the “People Hub” to start exactly twice without crashing immediately.

3. Update after you install

Download the most recent version from the Insider’s page, and you still have to apply an update to the entire system before you’re actually up to date. The update takes essentially as long as the initial install.

4. Update before you install – and make a backup

Hey, it’s a beta – what did you expect?

Things will break, you’ll find yourself missing functionality, so you may need to restore to your original state. Update before you install, and fewer things will be as likely to go wrong in the upgrade.

5. Provide feedback – even about the little things

They won’t fix things you don’t provide feedback about.

OK, so maybe they also won’t fix things that you DO provide feedback on, but that’s how life works. Not everything gets fixed. Ever.

But if you don’t report issues, you won’t ever see them fixed.

6. The new People Hub is awful

The People “Hub” in Windows 10, from the couple of times I’ve managed to execute it, basically has my contacts, and can display what’s new from them in Outlook Mail.

I rather enjoy the Windows 8.1 People Hub, where you can see in one place the most recent interactions in Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn and Skype. Or at least, that’s what it promises, even if it only actually delivers Facebook and Twitter.

7. Videos can now be deleted

It’s always possible to delete a video file, of course, but in Windows 8.1, after you’ve finished watching a video from the Videos app, you had to go find some other tool in which to do so – and hope that you deleted the right one.

In Windows 10 you can use the context menu (right click, or tap and hold) on a video to delete it from your store.

Still needs some more work – it doesn’t display subtitles / closed-captioning, it only orders alphabetically, and there’s no jumping to the letter “Q” by pressing the “Q” key, but this app is already looking very functional even for those of us who collect MP4 files to watch.

8. No Media Center

I really, really liked the Media Center. More than TiVo. We have several Media Center PCs in our house, and now we have to figure out what we’re going to do. I’m not going back to having a made-for-purpose device that can’t do computing, I want my Media Center. I’ll try some of its competitors, but it’d be really nice if Microsoft relents and puts support back for Media Center.

9. Edge / Spartan browser – awesome

Excellent HTML5 compatibility, reduced chance of being hit by third party vulnerabilities, F12 Developer Tools, and still allows me to test for XSS vulnerabilities if I choose to do so.

Pretty much what I want in a browser, although from a security standpoint, the choice to allow two third party vulnerabilities add-ins into the browser, Flash and Reader, seems to be begging future trouble.

Having said that, you can disable Adobe Flash in the Advanced Settings of your Spartan browser. I’m going to recommend that you do that on all your non-gaming machines. Then find out which of your web sites need it, and either fix them, or decide whether you can balance the threat of Flash with the utility of that service.

The F12 Developer Tools continue to be a very useful set of web site debugging tools, and assist me greatly in discovering and expanding on web site vulnerabilities. I personally find them easier than debugging tools in other browsers, and they have the benefit of being always installed in recent Microsoft browsers.

The “Reader” view is a nice feature, although it was present in Windows 8.1, and should be used any time you want to actually read the contents of a story, rather than wade through adverts and constant resizing of other content around the text you’re actually interested in.

9.1 XSS

Because, you know, I’m all about the XSS.

Internet Explorer has a pretty assertive XSS filter built in, and even when you turn it off in your settings, it still comes back to prevent you. I find this to be tricky, because I sometimes need to convince developers of the vulnerabilities in their apps. Firefox is often helpful here, because it has NO filters, but sometimes the behaviour I’m trying to show is specific to Internet Explorer.

Particularly, if I type a quote character into the URL in Internet Explorer, it sends a quote character. Firefox will send a %22 or %27 (double or single quotes). So, sometimes IE will trigger behaviour that Firefox doesn’t.

Sadly, although Spartan does seem to still be useful for XSS testing, the XSS filter can’t be specifically turned off in settings. I’d love to see if I can find a secret setting for this.

10. Microsoft Print to PDF

Windows has needed a PDF printer since, oh, Windows 3.1. A print driver that prompts you for a file name, and saves whatever you’re printing as a PDF file.

With Office, this kind of existed with Save as PDF. With OneNote, you could Print to OneNote, open the View ribbon, and hide the header, before exporting as a PDF. But that’s the long way around.

With Windows 10, Microsoft installed a new printer driver, “Microsoft Print to PDF”. It does what it says on the tin, allowing you to generate PDFs from anywhere that can print.

11. Tablet Mode / PC mode

I use a Surface Pro 3 as my main system, and I have to say that the reversion to a mainly desktop model of operations is nice to my eyes, but a little confusing to the hands – I don’t quite know how to manage things any more.

Sometimes I like to work without the keyboard, because the tablet works well that way. But now I can’t close apps by sliding from top to bottom, even when I’ve expanded them to full screen. Not sure how I’m supposed to do this.