.Local revisited

On July 22, 2008, in news, by

http://msmvps.com/blogs/bradley/archive/2008/07/22/and-another-local.aspx#1641780

“Have you ever had to deploy OCS?” Yes.  In a .local based domain in fact.  The trick is to build another DNS entry with a _tcp _sip property that points to the member server that has the Live Communication Server running.  Then to ensure that the domain will will reroute out to your ISP’s DNS, you put an A record to so that the domain/web site will still resolve.

The thing is that having .local doesn’t block you, nor, would I argue makes setting up these technologies any harder. 

The point of that post that I made was that indeed we should be discussing why we might need .com versus .local, not that SBS blocked the use of it because it doesn’t.  And quite frankly as var/vaps we should be looking very closing at that answer file tool because that’s the only means to get a server in a migration mode.  Thus my guess is that most of you will be using that answer file for the bulk of your new installs and certainly ALL of your migration installs.

The point of my post was not to diss the merits of .com versus .local and if it came across that way, it wasn’t meant to, but rather to ask that we stop asking about the request of giving us the option of doing a Top Level domain at a time when the SBS 2008 product has just hit RC1 status and in fact it does allow this option.  To make any changes at this time to the installer would hurt a huge amount to rip out the install routine as it stands now.  It would delay the release of SBS 2008.  Windows 2008 has a different install story.  Ergo so does SBS 2008.  That’s our new reality.  I’d rather have a post over the fact that in 2k8 I can’t do a repair install of the Operating System.  There’s no way to plunk down Windows 2008, fire up that media and reinstall the OS over the top of it.

So do let’s get to the better meat of that post.

Why should you do .com?  In SBS 2003 there were some issues with sync’ing Windows Mobile devices docked and non docked due to ISA being on the same box and messing with proxy settings.  In SBS 2008 ISA is no longer on the same box.  Issue?  Probably not anymore.

Why should you do .com?  The argument was made for setting up OCS.  (Okay lets put aside the argument that most SBS domains won’t be doing OCS anyway…but…) I can tell you that I have LCS here with an internal .local and all I had to do was to set up a _sip record under the  domain name.  Personally I didn’t find it any more or less confusing with the .local versus if I had a .com?

Does it provide you with any additional features or functions as you grow?  I’m still not convinced.  I see people making arguements that they can do what they need to do with both setups.  All it takes is a judicious A record editing and it depends on if you want to do that DNS editing on your server (if .local) or an ISP’s server (if .com).  But one thing is clear you do need to have full access to DNS information and ensure you can make the edits you need.

So I’m still saying “Make your choice, both are do-able, but stop discussing the install experience of SBS 2008 because we do have the choice.

 

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