Impact of drives on Outlook speed

On March 25, 2009, in news, by

http://msexchangeteam.com/archive/2009/03/24/450881.aspx

So how do you know how good or how back your computer is?

If you have a Vista workstation you already have the tools you need.

Click start, find accessories, find command line, right mouse click and run as administrator.

Type in winsat disk -seq -read -drive c

(that checks the c drive)

C:\Windows\system32>winsat disk -seq -read -drive c
Windows System Assessment Tool
> Running: Feature Enumeration v1.0.0.0 ”
> Run Time 00:00:00.08
> Running: Storage Assessment v2.0.0.0 ‘-seq -read -drive c’
> Run Time 00:00:15.14
> Disk  Sequential 64.0 Read                   36.81 MB/s          4.8
> Total Run Time 00:00:17.49

C:\Windows\system32>

That’s my old baby laptop.  Not so good.

 C:\Windows\system32>winsat disk -seq -read -drive c
Windows System Assessment Tool
> Running: Feature Enumeration v1.0.0.0 ”
> Run Time 00:00:00.59
> Running: Storage Performance Assessment via Profiling v1.0.0.0 ‘-seq -read -drive c’
> Run Time 00:00:18.00
> Disk Performance                           102.66 MB/s
> Total Run Time 00:00:18.94

That’s the workstation at the office. 

BIG difference.

 

WinSAT score

 

 

 

 

Drive characteristics

 

 

 

 

SP1 before Feb update

 

 

 

 

SP1 after Feb update and later versions

 

 

 

 

Less than 15 MB/s

 

 

 

Generation 1 and Generation 2 SSDs (early 2008)

 

 

 

Unusable

 

 

 

Reasonable, responsive, limited hangs and pauses

 

 

 

Between 15 MB/s and 30 MB/s

 

 

 

Most Generation 2 SSDs (after April 2008); many 5400 rpm laptop rotational drives

 

 

 

Many hangs and pauses throughout the day

 

 

 

Reasonable, responsive, limited hangs and pauses

 

 

 

Between 30 MB/s and 40 MB/s

 

 

 

Some high-end Generation 2 SSDs (after September 2008); many 7200 rpm rotational drives

 

 

 

Reasonable, responsive, limited hangs and pauses

 

 

 

Quick, responsive, only occasional hangs

 

 

 

Greater than 40 MB/s

 

 

 

Generation 3 SSDs, both MLC and SLC technology (November 2008); many 10000 rpm rotational drives

 

 

 

Quick, responsive, only occasional hangs

 

 

 

Quick, responsive, rarely hangs

 

6 Responses to Impact of drives on Outlook speed

  1. Dean says:

    Holy crap that’s cool !

    “That’s the workstation at the office.”

    Show off

  2. Robert says:

    Sorry about what is probably a newbie question, but How do you prevent the Command window from going away after the command is finished?

  3. indy says:

    That actually isn’t that great a score, especially for a workstation. I get 119 MB/s on a 2 year old core2duo/RAID1 with 3 year old Western Digital SATA’s.

    Then again, we passe on Outlook/Office 2007, the performance was not ever satisfactory for us. Might be worth looking into again however.

  4. indy says:

    Oh but your laptop does better than my brand new HP Elitebook 2530p. We only get 33.72 MB/s there… 🙁

  5. Chris Knight says:

    Interesting that Feature Enumeration picks a different algorithm to test with. Not exactly what you’d call best practice in benchmarking. No doubt for normalising a score between 1.0 and 5.9.

    Hey, I peeled these apples quicker with peeler A than these oranges with peeler B. Peeler A must be better! Err, not necessarily.

    Be interesting to see what you get on both boxes for sequential disk speed using the same benchmarking algorithm and comparing it with the values above.

  6. shouldnt you use the -write parameter instead of -read?

    from the article:
    “A good metric to use when gauging data file performance on specific hardware is the disk drive’s noncontiguous write performance.”