How to Remove Programs from “Open with” Context Menu in Windows

The Open with context menu allows users to choose an app to open a file with.

Sometimes your “Open with” context menu may include programs you no longer want listed for a file extension. For example, an uninstalled program, or if you mistakenly opened a file with the wrong program.

This tutorial will show you how to remove third-party programs from the Open with context menu for only your account in Windows 7, Windows 8, or Windows 10.

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How to Enable or Disable Fast Tab/Window Close in Google Chrome in Windows

In Google Chrome, you can enable or disable a flag for an experimental feature which affects the tab and window closing performance of Google Chrome.

When the Fast tab/window close flag is enabled, Chrome runs a tab’s onunload JavaScript handler independently of the GUI.

This tutorial will show you how to enable or disable fast tab and window closing in Google Chrome for your account in Windows 7, Windows 8, or Windows 10.

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How to Manage Audio Focus Across Tabs in Google Chrome in Windows

In Google Chrome, you can enable or disable a flag to mute a previous tab playing audio whenever you open another tab and play audio.

This tutorial will show you how to enable or disable manage audio focus across tabs to mute a previous tab playing audio whenever you open another tab and play audio in Google Chrome for your account in Windows 7, Windows 8, or Windows 10.

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How to Clear Activities from Timeline in Windows 10

Starting with Windows 10 build 17040, Microsoft added settings that let you to view and manage your activity history. Your collected activity history allows you to jump back into what you were doing with apps, docs, or other activities, either on your PC or your phone. To resume your activities, Windows needs to collect your PC activity.

Activity history in Windows 10 helps keep track of the things you do on your device. Activity history keeps track of the apps and services you use, the files you open, and the websites you browse—and when you do these things. Your activity history is collected and stored locally on your device, and if you’ve signed into your device with a Microsoft account and given your permission, Windows sends your activity history to Microsoft. Once your activity history has been collected, Microsoft uses that data to enable cross-device experiences, to provide you with personalized experiences and relevant suggestions, and to help improve Microsoft products.

Activity history is also created and sent to Microsoft when you use Microsoft apps, such as Microsoft Edge, and Office apps like Word, Excel, and PowerPoint, on mobile devices such as iOS and Android phones and tablets. If you are signed-in with your Microsoft account, you can continue activities on your Windows device that you started in Microsoft apps on your Android or iOS device.

Timeline is now available in Windows 10 starting with build 17063. In Timeline, a user activity is the combination of a specific app and a specific piece of content you were working on at a specific time. Each activity links right back to a webpage, document, article, playlist, or task, saving you time when you want to resume that activity later.

In addition to resuming past activities through Timeline, your personal digital assistant Cortana will suggest activities you might want to pick up where you left off (resume) to help you stay productive as you switch between your phone, laptop, and other Cortana-enabled devices. This experience is powered by the same activities that appear in Timeline.

Starting with Windows 10 17083, Microsoft added a new setting that allows you to sync your activities to the cloud for a seamless cross-device experience. You can enable Let Windows sync my activities from this PC to the cloud in the settings app, or you can enable it via an option provided at the bottom of Timeline. Until you turn on syncing your activities to the cloud, Timeline will only show up to 4 days of your activities. Once turned on, timeline will show up to 30 days of your activities.

This tutorial will show you how to clear an activity or group of activities in your timeline for your account in Windows 10.

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How to Change User Account Control (UAC) prompt Behavior for Standard Users in Windows

When User Account Control (UAC) is enabled, Windows prompts for consent or prompts for credentials of a valid local administrator account before starting a program or task that requires a full administrator access token. This prompt ensures that no malicious software can be silently installed or run.

With the Always notify or Default UAC setting enabled, your desktop will be dimmed and switched to the secure desktop when you get an elevation request by the User Account Control (UAC) prompt.

A user that is a member of the Administrators group can log on, browse the Web, and read e-mail while using a standard user access token. When the administrator needs to perform a task that requires the administrator access token, Windows 10 automatically prompts the user for Y/N approval. This prompt is called an elevation prompt for UAC consent prompt.

The user experience for standard users is different from that of administrators in Admin Approval Mode. The recommended and more secure method of running Windows 10 is to make your primary user account a standard user account. Running as a standard user helps to maximize security for a managed environment. With the built-in UAC elevation component, standard users can easily perform an administrative task by entering valid credentials for a local administrator account. The default, built-in UAC elevation component for standard users is the UAC credential prompt.

See also: How User Account Control works (Windows 10) | Microsoft Docs

If you like, you can set a local security policy that controls the behavior of the UAC elevation prompt for standard users.

This tutorial will show you how to change the User Account Control (UAC) prompt behavior only for standard users in Windows 7, Windows 8, or Windows 10.

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How to Change User Account Control (UAC) prompt Behavior for Administrators in Windows

When User Account Control (UAC) is enabled, Windows prompts for consent or prompts for credentials of a valid local administrator account before starting a program or task that requires a full administrator access token. This prompt ensures that no malicious software can be silently installed or run.

With the Always notify or Default UAC setting enabled, your desktop will be dimmed and switched to the secure desktop when you get an elevation request by the User Account Control (UAC) prompt.

A user that is a member of the Administrators group can log on, browse the Web, and read e-mail while using a standard user access token. When the administrator needs to perform a task that requires the administrator access token, Windows 10 automatically prompts the user for Y/N approval. This prompt is called an elevation prompt for UAC consent prompt.

The user experience for standard users is different from that of administrators in Admin Approval Mode. The recommended and more secure method of running Windows 10 is to make your primary user account a standard user account. Running as a standard user helps to maximize security for a managed environment. With the built-in UAC elevation component, standard users can easily perform an administrative task by entering valid credentials for a local administrator account. The default, built-in UAC elevation component for standard users is the UAC credential prompt.

See also: How User Account Control works (Windows 10) | Microsoft Docs

If you like, you can set a local security policy that controls the behavior of the elevation prompt for administrators.

This tutorial will show you how to change the User Account Control (UAC) prompt behavior only for administrators in Windows 7, Windows 8, or Windows 10.

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How to Enable or Disable User Account Control (UAC) prompt for Built-in Administrator in Windows

When User Account Control (UAC) is enabled, Windows prompts for consent or prompts for credentials of a valid local administrator account before starting a program or task that requires a full administrator access token. This prompt ensures that no malicious software can be silently installed or run.

With the Always notify or Default UAC setting enabled, your desktop will be dimmed and switched to the secure desktop when you get an elevation request by the User Account Control (UAC) prompt.

A user that is a member of the Administrators group can log on, browse the Web, and read e-mail while using a standard user access token. When the administrator needs to perform a task that requires the administrator access token, Windows 10 automatically prompts the user for Y/N approval. This prompt is called an elevation prompt for UAC consent prompt.

The user experience for standard users is different from that of administrators in Admin Approval Mode. The recommended and more secure method of running Windows 10 is to make your primary user account a standard user account. Running as a standard user helps to maximize security for a managed environment. With the built-in UAC elevation component, standard users can easily perform an administrative task by entering valid credentials for a local administrator account. The default, built-in UAC elevation component for standard users is the UAC credential prompt.

The built-in Administrator account does not get the UAC consent prompt since it runs with full administrative privilege (elevated rights) by default.

If you like, you can set a local security policy that controls whether the built-in Administrator account will be prompted by UAC just like any other administrator account.

This tutorial will show you how to enable or disable User Account Control (UAC) for the built-in Administrator account in Windows 7, Windows 8, or Windows 10.

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How to Enable or Disable Dimmed Secure Desktop for UAC prompt in Windows

When User Account Control (UAC) is enabled, Windows prompts for consent or prompts for credentials of a valid local administrator account before starting a program or task that requires a full administrator access token. This prompt ensures that no malicious software can be silently installed or run.

With the Always notify or Default UAC setting enabled, your desktop will be dimmed and switched to the secure desktop when you get an elevation request by the User Account Control (UAC) prompt.

A user that is a member of the Administrators group can log on, browse the Web, and read e-mail while using a standard user access token. When the administrator needs to perform a task that requires the administrator access token, Windows 10 automatically prompts the user for Y/N approval. This prompt is called an elevation prompt for UAC consent prompt.

The user experience for standard users is different from that of administrators in Admin Approval Mode. The recommended and more secure method of running Windows 10 is to make your primary user account a standard user account. Running as a standard user helps to maximize security for a managed environment. With the built-in UAC elevation component, standard users can easily perform an administrative task by entering valid credentials for a local administrator account. The default, built-in UAC elevation component for standard users is the UAC credential prompt.

See also: How User Account Control works (Windows 10) | Microsoft Docs

If you like, you can set a local security policy that controls whether the UAC prompt is displayed on the interactive user’s desktop or the dimmed secure desktop (default).

  • If enabled (default), all elevation requests go to the secure desktop regardless of prompt behavior policy settings for administrators and standard users.
  • If disabled, all elevation requests go to the interactive user’s desktop. Prompt behavior policy settings for administrators and standard users are used.

This tutorial will show you how to enable or disable the User Account Control (UAC) prompt displaying on the dimmed secure desktop for all users in Windows 7, Windows 8, or Windows 10.

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How to Enable or Disable User Account Control (UAC) in Windows

When User Account Control (UAC) is enabled, Windows prompts for consent or prompts for credentials of a valid local administrator account before starting a program or task that requires a full administrator access token. This prompt ensures that no malicious software can be silently installed or run.

A user that is a member of the Administrators group can log on, browse the Web, and read e-mail while using a standard user access token. When the administrator needs to perform a task that requires the administrator access token, Windows 10 automatically prompts the user for Y/N approval. This prompt is called an elevation prompt for UAC consent prompt.

The user experience for standard users is different from that of administrators in Admin Approval Mode. The recommended and more secure method of running Windows 10 is to make your primary user account a standard user account. Running as a standard user helps to maximize security for a managed environment. With the built-in UAC elevation component, standard users can easily perform an administrative task by entering valid credentials for a local administrator account. The default, built-in UAC elevation component for standard users is the UAC credential prompt.

This tutorial will show you how to enable or disable User Account Control (UAC) for all users in Windows 7, Windows 8, or Windows 10.

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How to Enable or Disable Ctrl+Alt+Delete Secure Desktop for UAC prompt in Windows

When User Account Control (UAC) is enabled, Windows prompts for consent or prompts for credentials of a valid local administrator account before starting a program or task that requires a full administrator access token. This prompt ensures that no malicious software can be silently installed or run.

A user that is a member of the Administrators group can log on, browse the Web, and read e-mail while using a standard user access token. When the administrator needs to perform a task that requires the administrator access token, Windows 10 automatically prompts the user for Y/N approval. This prompt is called an elevation prompt for UAC consent prompt.

The user experience for standard users is different from that of administrators in Admin Approval Mode. The recommended and more secure method of running Windows 10 is to make your primary user account a standard user account. Running as a standard user helps to maximize security for a managed environment. With the built-in UAC elevation component, standard users can easily perform an administrative task by entering valid credentials for a local administrator account. The default, built-in UAC elevation component for standard users is the UAC credential prompt.

If you like, you can enable a policy that requires users to press Ctrl+Alt+Delete when prompted by UAC to provide consent (administrators) or credentials (standard users) on the Secure Desktop by means of the trusted path mechanism for better security. This can prevent a Trojan horse or other types of malicious code from stealing the user’s Windows credentials.

This tutorial will show you how to enable or disable requiring Ctrl+Alt+Delete Secure Desktop (aka: authentic Windows sign-in screen) for User Account Control (UAC) prompt for all users in Windows 7, Windows 8, or Windows 10.

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How to Hide or Show Administrators in UAC prompt for Standard Users in Windows

When User Account Control (UAC) is enabled, Windows prompts for consent or prompts for credentials of a valid local administrator account before starting a program or task that requires a full administrator access token. This prompt ensures that no malicious software can be silently installed.

A user that is a member of the Administrators group can log on, browse the Web, and read e-mail while using a standard user access token. When the administrator needs to perform a task that requires the administrator access token, Windows 10 automatically prompts the user for Y/N approval. This prompt is called an elevation prompt (UAC).

When UAC is enabled, the user experience for standard users is different from that of administrators in Admin Approval Mode. The recommended and more secure method of running Windows 10 is to make your primary user account a standard user account. Running as a standard user helps to maximize security for a managed environment. With the built-in UAC elevation component, standard users can easily perform an administrative task by entering valid credentials for a local administrator account. The default, built-in UAC elevation component for standard users is the credential prompt.

If you like, you can set a policy to control whether administrator accounts are displayed in the UAC prompt when a standard user attempts to run as administrator (elevate) an app. If set to hide, standard users will always be required to enter both the user name and password of a local administrator account to elevate instead of just selecting an administrator and entering their password.

This tutorial will show you how to always hide or show administrator accounts in the User Account Control (UAC) prompt for standard users in Windows 7, Windows 8, or Windows 10.

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How to Automatically Make OneDrive Files On-Demand Online-only in Windows 10

OneDrive Files On-Demand is available starting with Windows 10 build 16215 and OneDrive app build 17.3.7064.1005 or later.

OneDrive Files On-Demand helps you access all your files in OneDrive without having to download all of them and use storage space on your device.

When you turn on Files On-Demand, you’ll see all your files in File Explorer and get new information about each file. New files created online or on another device appear as online-only files, which don’t take up space on your device. When you’re connected to the Internet, you’ll be able to use the files like every other file on your device.

Starting with Windows 10 build 17692, Storage Sense picks up a new skill adding the ability to automatically make any downloaded Files On-Demand online-only if you haven’t used them in a certain number of days.

This tutorial will show you how to make any downloaded OneDrive Files On-Demand online-only if you haven’t used them in a specified number of days for your account in Windows 10.

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How to Change Text Size in Windows 10

Starting with Windows 10 build 17692, the ability to increase text size across the system is back and better than ever. You can use a new setting called Make everything bigger with a slider that will adjust text across the system, win32 (desktop) apps, and UWP (Store) apps.

This tutorial will show you how to change the text size across the system for your account in Windows 10.

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How to Change Deadline before Auto-restart for Update in Windows 10

Microsoft has made it easier for Windows Update to keep Windows 10 updated by automatically downloading and installing the latest features and improvements, drivers, and hotfixes released by Microsoft—and with fewer interruptions and restarts when you’re using your PC the most. The latest updates will automatically download and install when they’re available. (Unless you’re on a metered connection, then updates won’t download until you manually check for updates.)

After an update is installed, Windows 10 attempts automatic restart outside of active hours. If the restart does not succeed after the deadline of 7 days (by default), the user will see a warning notification that restart is required.

If you like, you can use the Specify deadline before auto-restart for update installation policy to specify the deadline in days before automatically executing a scheduled restart outside of active hours. The deadline can be set from the default 7 days to a number between 2 and 30 days from the time the restart is scheduled.

This tutorial will show you how to change the deadline in days before automatically executing a scheduled restart outside of active hours for a Windows Update in Windows 10.

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How to Configure Auto-restart Warning Notifications Schedule for Updates in Windows 10

Microsoft has made it easier for Windows Update to keep Windows 10 updated by automatically downloading and installing the latest features and improvements, drivers, and hotfixes released by Microsoft—and with fewer interruptions and restarts when you’re using your PC the most. The latest updates will automatically download and install when they’re available. (Unless you’re on a metered connection, then updates won’t download until you manually check for updates.)

After an update is installed, Windows 10 attempts automatic restart outside of active hours. If the restart does not succeed after the deadline of 7 days (by default), the user will see a notification that restart is required.

Since users are not able to postpone a scheduled restart once the deadline has been reached, you can configure a warning reminder (4 hours default) prior to the scheduled restart. You can also configure a warning (15 minutes default) prior to the restart, to notify users once the restart is imminent and allow them to save their work.

This tutorial will show you how to specify when notifications are displayed to warn users about a scheduled restart for a Windows Update installation deadline in Windows 10.

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How to Configure Auto-restart Reminder Notifications for Updates in Windows 10

Microsoft has made it easier for Windows Update to keep Windows 10 updated by automatically downloading and installing the latest features and improvements, drivers, and hotfixes released by Microsoft—and with fewer interruptions and restarts when you’re using your PC the most. The latest updates will automatically download and install when they’re available. (Unless you’re on a metered connection, then updates won’t download until you manually check for updates.)

When a restart is required to install updates, you can schedule a time to restart and finish installing updates.

By default, a auto-restart reminder notification will be shown 15 minutes prior to a scheduled restart.

If you like, you can set a policy to specify the amount of time you want prior to a scheduled restart to notify users.

This tutorial will show you how to specify the amount of time prior to a scheduled restart for Windows Update to show auto-restart reminder notifications in Windows 10.

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How to Find Bluetooth Version in Windows

Bluetooth is a short range wireless technology which enables wireless data transmission between two Bluetooth enabled devices located nearby each other.

If your Windows device includes Bluetooth support, then you may want to know what Bluetooth version you have to know if it supports a feature or device you want to use with it.

For example, starting with Windows 10 version 1803 (April 2018 Update), your device must have Bluetooth 4.0 or later with Low Energy (LE) support if you want to use the Nearby sharing feature to send files and links to nearby devices over Bluetooth.

This tutorial will show you how to find out what Bluetooth version you have on your Windows 7, Windows 8, or Windows 10 PC.

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How to Configure Auto-restart Required Notification for Updates in Windows 10

Microsoft has made it easier for Windows Update to keep Windows 10 updated by automatically downloading and installing the latest features and improvements, drivers, and hotfixes released by Microsoft—and with fewer interruptions and restarts when you’re using your PC the most. The latest updates will automatically download and install when they’re available. (Unless you’re on a metered connection, then updates won’t download until you manually check for updates.)

When a restart is required to install updates, the auto-restart required notification is displayed. By default, the notification is automatically dismissed after 25 seconds. If you like, you can enable a policy to require user action to dismiss the notification. This will help make sure users see the notification to restart, and save their work first.

This tutorial will show you how to require user action to dismiss the auto-restart required notification for Windows Update in Windows 10.

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How to Specify Max Active Hours Range for Auto-restarts in Windows 10

Active hours identify the period of time when you expect the device to be in use. Automatic restarts after an update will occur outside of the active hours.

By default, active hours are from 8 AM to 5 PM. Users can change the active hours manually with a max active hours range of 18 hours by default.

Starting with Windows 10 version 1703, administrators can specify the max active hours range users can set. This option gives you additional flexibility to leave some of the decision for active hours on the user’s side, while making sure you allow enough time for updating. The specified range will be counted from the active hours start time.

This tutorial will show you how to specify the maximum number of hours from the start time that users can set their active hours for Windows Update auto-restarts in Windows 10.

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How to View All Network Shares on a Windows PC

File sharing over a network in Windows 10 allows you to share files and folders on your computer with other users over a private or public network in your workgroup or domain.

You can set the permissions of a shared file or folder to allow groups or users to have a read only, change (modify), or full control access rights.

Starting with Windows 10 version 1803, some features of file sharing over a network have changed, including the removal of HomeGroup. However, even though HomeGroup has been removed, you can still share printers and files by using features that are built into Windows 10.

This tutorial will show you different ways on how to view all network shares on a Windows 7, Windows 8, or Windows 10 PC in your network.

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