Network – Page 3 – Windows Blog by Brink

Network

How to Enable or Disable SMB1 File Sharing Protocol in Windows

The Server Message Block (SMB) Protocol is a network file sharing protocol, and as implemented in Microsoft Windows is known as Microsoft SMB Protocol. The set of message packets that defines a particular version of the protocol is called a dialect. The Common Internet File System (CIFS) Protocol is a dialect of SMB. Both SMB and CIFS are also available on VMS, several versions of Unix, and other operating systems.

For security reasons, Microsoft recommends that you disable SMB1 immediately. Ransomware targets the vulnerabilities of the SMB service of the Windows operating system to propagate. To defend yourself against WannaCrypt ransomware it is imperative that you disable SMB1 as well as install the patches released by Microsoft.

Starting in Windows 10 Fall Creators Update and Windows Server, version 1709 (RS3), the Server Message Block version 1 (SMB1) network protocol is no longer installed (enabled) by default. It was superseded by SMB2 and later protocols starting in 2007. Microsoft publicly deprecated the SMB1 protocol in 2014.

If you try to connect to devices that support only SMB1, or if these devices try to connect to you, you may receive an error message if SMB1 is disabled.

This tutorial will show you how to enable or disable the SMB 1.0/CIFS File Sharing Support protocol feature in Windows 7, Windows 8, Windows 8.1, and Windows 10.

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How to Create Network Connections Shortcut in Windows 10

A network connection is a set of information that enables your computer to connect to the Internet, a network, or another computer. When you install a network adapter in your computer, Windows creates a connection for it in the Network Connections folder. A local area connection is created for an Ethernet network adapter. A wireless network connection is created for a wireless network adapter.

In the Network Connections folder, you can select a connection and view status information, such as connection duration, speed, and amounts of data transmitted and received; and you can use any diagnostic tools available for a particular connection. Depending on the status of the connection, the icon changes appearance in the Network Connections folder.

This tutorial will show you how to create or download a Network Connections shortcut that opens in the Control Panel or Settings for your account in Windows 10.

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How to Enable or Disable Mobile Hotspot in Windows 10

By default, any user can turn your Windows 10 PC into a mobile hotspot by sharing the Internet connection with other devices over Wi-Fi. Users can share a Wi-Fi, Ethernet, or cellular data connection. If your PC has a cellular data connection and you share it, it will use data from your data plan.

This tutorial will show you how to enable or disable the mobile hotspot feature for all users in Windows 10.

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How to Add a Shared Printer in Windows 10

Network printers are able to connect directly to your network using Wi-Fi or Ethernet, and are available to anyone on the same network by default.

If you have a printer connected to and setup on your computer instead, then you will need to share the printer before it will be available to anyone on the same network.

Network printer sharing allows another computer on your network to print to the printer connected to your computer on the same network.

The HomeGroup service will no longer be available starting with Windows 10 build 17063. The user profile used for sharing and the file/folder/printer shares will continue to work.

This tutorial will show you how to add a shared printer without using HomeGroup in Windows 10.

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How to Share a Printer in Windows 10

Network printers are able to connect directly to your network using Wi-Fi or Ethernet, and are available to add for anyone on the same network by default.

If you have a printer connected to and setup on your computer instead, then you will need to share the printer before it will be available to add for anyone on the same network.

Network printer sharing allows another computer on your network to print to the printer connected to your computer on the same network.

The HomeGroup service will no longer be available starting with Windows 10 build 17063. The user profile used for sharing and the file/folder/printer shares will continue to work.

This tutorial will show you how to unshare or share a printer over the network without using HomeGroup in Windows 10.

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How to Add Data Usage Live Tile to Start in Windows 10

Windows 10 includes a feature to let you view the network data usage of the PC from the last 30 days. The data usage is itemized per type of network (ex: Wi-Fi or Ethernet), and by app usage.

If you like, you could see your data usage at a glance from a data usage live tile on your Start menu.

This tutorial will show you how to add a network data usage live tile on the Start menu for your account in Windows 10.

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How to Restrict Background Data Usage for Wi-Fi and Ethernet in Windows 10

Starting with Windows 10 build 17063, you can now configure data limits and/or place background data restrictions to Wi-Fi and Ethernet connections, in addition to cellular connections, in the Data usage page in Settings. The updated settings page aims to support a diverse set of devices and users. Whether you have a PC with cellular connectivity or a metered ethernet network connection, tailor your data usage to your budget and needs.

Restricting background data will limit what Store apps and Windows features can do in the background to help reduce data usage for network connections.

This tutorial will show you how to configure background data usage restrictions to Wi-Fi and Ethernet connections for all users in Windows 10.

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How to Set Data Limit for Wi-Fi and Ethernet in Windows 10

Starting with Windows 10 build 17063, you can now configure data limits and/or place background data restrictions to Wi-Fi and Ethernet connections, in addition to cellular connections, in the Data usage page in Settings. The updated settings page aims to support a diverse set of devices and users. Whether you have a PC with cellular connectivity or a metered ethernet network connection, tailor your data usage to your budget and needs.

This tutorial will show you how to set, edit, or remove a data limit to Wi-Fi and Ethernet connections for all users in Windows 10.

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Hide or Show Firewall and Network Protection in Windows Defender Security Center in Windows 10

Windows 10 version 1703 and later provides the latest antivirus protection with Windows Defender Security Center, which contains Windows Defender Antivirus. When you start up Windows 10 for the first time, Windows Defender Antivirus is on and actively helping to protect your device by scanning for malware (malicious software), viruses, and security threats.

Windows Defender Antivirus uses real-time protection to scan your downloads and the programs you run on your device. Also, Windows Update downloads updates for Windows Defender Antivirus automatically to help keep your device safe and protect it from threats.

Starting with Windows 10 version 1709, the Firewall & network protection section can be hidden from users of the PC. This can be useful if you don’t want them to see or have access to this section.

If you choose to hide the Firewall & network protection section, it will no longer appear on the home page of the Windows Defender Security Center app, and its icon will not be shown on the navigation bar on the side of the app.

This tutorial will show you how to hide or show the Firewall and network protection section in the Windows Defender Security Center app for all users in Windows 10.

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How to See Network Adapter Speed in Windows 10

A network adapter is the component of a PC’s internal hardware that is used for communicating over a network with another computer and Internet.

Sometimes you may need to check to see what the current maximum speed is for your network adapters to see if they are performing at specs. This can be helpful with troubleshooting network performance issues.

This tutorial will show you how to check the current maximum speed of your network adapters in Windows 10.

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How to Enable or Disable Energy Efficient Ethernet for a Modem

uring periods of low data activity, Energy Efficient Ethernet (802.3az EEE) allows for less power consumption by 50% or more while retaining full compatibility with existing equipment.

If your modem (ex: Arris 6190) supports EEE, you could enable or disable EEE to reduce the power consumption of your modem while idle.

This tutorial will show you how to enable or disable Energy Efficient Ethernet (802.3az EEE) for your modem.

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How to Add or Remove Wireless Adapter Settings in Power Options in Windows 10

The Power Saving Mode setting under Wireless Adapter Settings in Power Options allows you to control the power saving mode of wireless adapters.

The strength and performance of your wireless network will decrease as you increase power savings, but your battery life will increase.

This tutorial will show you how to add or remove Power Saving Mode under Wireless Adapter Settings in Power Options for all users in Windows 10.

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How to Change Wireless Network Connection Priority Order in Windows 10

Windows will usually automatically connect to networks in this priority order:

• Ethernet
• Wi‑Fi (wireless)
• Mobile broadband (cellular)

When you connect to a new wireless network, Windows will create a profile for the wireless network. A wireless (Wi-Fi) network profile contains the SSID (network name), password key, and security information to be able to connect to a wireless network.

Windows will automatically connect to your wireless network profiles based on a priority order when the wireless network is in range, and an Ethernet connection is not available.

If you check “Connect automatically” while connecting to a wireless network, it will be placed at the top of the priority list.

If you have multiple wireless network connections, you can change the priority so the network profile you prefer will be the first one to use instead.

This tutorial will show you how to change the connection priority order of wireless network profiles to your preference in Windows 10.

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How to Display Your DNS Resolver Cache in Windows 10

A DNS (Domain Name System) resolver cache is a temporary database, maintained by Windows, that contains records of all your recent visits and attempted visits to websites and other Internet domains.

The Internet relies on the Domain Name System (DNS) to maintain an index of all public websites and their corresponding IP addresses. Every time a user visits a website by its name (such as “tenforums.com”), the user’s web browser initiates a request out to the Internet, but this request cannot be completed until the website name is converted into an IP address.

This conversion process is called name resolution and is the job of DNS, but it takes time. A DNS cache attempts to speed up the process by handling the name resolution before the request is sent out to the Internet.

If the IP address of a website changes before your DNS cache updates, you may not be able to load the webpage. If you are running into a lot of Page Not Found errors and you know you are connected to the Internet, you could try flushing your DNS cache to have your computer request new information.

Viewing the contents of your DNS cache may help in troubleshooting to verify name resolution and IP.

This tutorial will show you how to view the contents of your DNS resolver cache in Windows 10.

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How to Flush DNS Resolver Cache in Windows 10

A DNS (Domain Name System) resolver cache is a temporary database, maintained by Windows, that contains records of all recent visits and attempted visits to websites and other Internet domains.

The Internet relies on the Domain Name System (DNS) to maintain an index of all public websites and their corresponding IP addresses. Every time a user visits a website by its name (such as “tenforums.com”), the user’s web browser initiates a request out to the Internet, but this request cannot be completed until the website name is converted into an IP address.

This conversion process is called name resolution and is the job of DNS, but it takes time. A DNS cache attempts to speed up the process by handling the name resolution before the request is sent out to the Internet.

If the IP address of a website changes before your DNS cache updates, you may not be able to load the webpage. If you are running into a lot of Page Not Found errors and you know you are connected to the Internet, you could try flushing your DNS cache to have your computer request new information.

This tutorial will show you how to flush your DNS resolver cache in Windows 10.

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