Power Options – Windows Blog by Brink

Power Options

How to Change Computer Sleep After Time in Windows 10

The Sleep after setting in Power Options allows users to specify how long in minutes the computer is inactive (idle) before automatically going to sleep.

Sleep uses very little power, your PC starts up faster, and you’re instantly back to where you left off. You don’t have to worry that you’ll lose your work because of your battery draining because Windows automatically saves all your work and turns off the PC if the battery is too low. Use sleep when you’re going to be away from your PC for just a little while – like when you’re taking a coffee break.

This tutorial will show you how to specify how long your computer is inactive before automatically going to sleep in Windows 10.

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How to Check if Connected or Disconnected Modern Standby in Windows 10

In Windows 10, there are two power models for PCs: S3 and Modern Standby (S0 Low Power Idle). The S3 power model is an older standard and is not capable of the instant on that consumers expect from modern devices. Modern Standby is capable of leveraging all the capabilities of a modern chipset and can be integrated across the breadth of tablets and PCs today. The first iteration of Modern Standby was Connected Standby, which first shipped in Windows 8 and Windows 8.1. Modern Standby expands upon the Windows 8.x Connected Standby concept, allowing more flexibility in component selection.

Windows 10 Modern Standby (Modern Standby) expands the Windows 8.1 Connected Standby power model. Connected Standby, and consequently Modern Standby, enable an instant on / instant off user experience, similar to smartphone power models. Just like the phone, the S0 low power idle model enables the system to stay up-to-date whenever a suitable network is available.

Although Modern Standby enables an instant on/off user experience like Connected Standby, Modern Standby is more inclusive than the Windows 8.1 Connected Standby power model. Modern Standby allows for market segments previously limited to the S3 power model to take advantage of the low power idle model. Example systems include systems based on rotational media and hybrid media (for example, SSD + HDD or SSHD) and/or a NIC that doesn’t support all of the prior requirements for Connected Standby.

Modern Standby systems can be connected or disconnected to Wi-Fi or a wireless local area network (WLAN) while in standby. This behavior is dictated by the hardware and/or by configuration.

Connected Modern Standby will allow you to stay connected to Wi-Fi while in standby to still receive and get notifications about email, VoIP calls, and such, but it will use more battery.

Disconnected Modern Standby will allow longer battery life, but you will no longer have the advantages of staying connected to Wi-Fi while in standby.

This tutorial will show you how to check if Modern Standby is set to be connected or disconnected to Wi-Fi while in standby in Windows 10.

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How to Check if Modern Standby is Supported in Windows 10

In Windows 10, there are two power models for PCs: S3 and Modern Standby (S0 Low Power Idle). The S3 power model is an older standard and is not capable of the instant on that consumers expect from modern devices. Modern Standby is capable of leveraging all the capabilities of a modern chipset and can be integrated across the breadth of tablets and PCs today. The first iteration of Modern Standby was Connected Standby, which first shipped in Windows 8 and Windows 8.1. Modern Standby expands upon the Windows 8.x Connected Standby concept, allowing more flexibility in component selection.

Windows 10 Modern Standby (Modern Standby) expands the Windows 8.1 Connected Standby power model. Connected Standby, and consequently Modern Standby, enable an instant on / instant off user experience, similar to smartphone power models. Just like the phone, the S0 low power idle model enables the system to stay up-to-date whenever a suitable network is available.

Although Modern Standby enables an instant on/off user experience like Connected Standby, Modern Standby is more inclusive than the Windows 8.1 Connected Standby power model. Modern Standby allows for market segments previously limited to the S3 power model to take advantage of the low power idle model. Example systems include systems based on rotational media and hybrid media (for example, SSD + HDD or SSHD) and/or a NIC that doesn’t support all of the prior requirements for Connected Standby.

This tutorial will show you how to check if the Modern Standby (S0 Low Power Idle) sleep state is supported by your Windows 10 PC.

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How to Turn On or Off Search Indexer Respect Device Power Mode Settings in Windows 10

Indexing the contents of your PC helps you get faster results when you’re searching it for files and other things. Learn how it works.

Indexing is the process of looking at files, email messages, and other content on your PC and cataloging their information, such as the words and metadata in them. When you search your PC after indexing, it looks at an index of terms to find results faster.

When you first run indexing, it can take up to a couple hours to complete. After that, indexing will run in the background on your PC as you use it, only re-indexing updated data.

Starting at least with Windows 10 build 18965, you can turn on or off having the search indexer respect device power mode settings. This will affect the indexer performance.

The Windows performance power slider enables you to quickly and intelligently trade performance of your system for longer battery life. As you switch between the four power modes to trade performance for battery life (or vice versa), Windows power settings are engaged behind the scenes. You are able to customize the default slider mode for both AC and DC, and can also configure the power settings, and PPM options, that are engaged for each slider mode.

This tutorial will show you how to turn on or off having the search indexer respect the device power mode settings for indexer performance for all users in Windows 10.

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How to View All Power Plan Settings in a Text File in Windows

A power plan is a collection of hardware and system settings that manages how your computer uses power. Power plans can help you save energy, maximize system performance, or achieve a balance between the two.

Normally, you could view all current settings of a power plan in Power Options. If you like, you could also output these settings to a text file. This can make it easier to share or show the power plan settings.

If you like, you can choose to include all hidden settings of a power plan, but these settings are hidden by default in Power Options since they usually do not apply to your computer.

This tutorial will show you how to output all current settings of a specified power plan to a text file to review in Windows 7, Windows 8, and Windows 10.

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How to Restore Missing Default Power Plans in Windows 10

A power plan is a collection of hardware and system settings that manages how your computer uses power. Power plans can help you save energy, maximize system performance, or achieve a balance between the two.

All users (standard and administrator) will be able to make changes to any power plan settings.

Changes made to a power plan will affect all users that have chosen the same power plan as their default active power scheme.

Windows 10 includes the following default power plans:

  • Balanced – Offers full performance when you need it and saves power when you don’t. This is the best power plan for most people.
  • Power saver – Saves power by reducing PC performance and screen brightness. If you’re using a laptop, this plan can help you get the most from a single battery charge.
  • High performance – Maximizes screen brightness and might increase PC performance. This plan uses a lot more energy, so your laptop battery won’t last as long between charges.
  • Ultimate Performance – Only available in the Windows 10 Pro for Workstations edition starting with Windows 10 build 17101. Provides ultimate performance on higher end PCs. It builds on the current High-Performance policy, and goes a step further to eliminate micro-latencies associated with fine grained power management techniques. As the power scheme is geared towards reducing micro-latencies it may directly impact hardware; and consume more power than the default balanced plan. The Ultimate Performance power policy is currently not available on battery powered systems.

This tutorial will show you how to restore the Balanced, High performance, Power saver, or Ultimate Performance default power plan if missing in Windows 10.

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Add or Remove ‘Processor performance decrease threshold’ from Power Options in Windows

The Processor performance decrease threshold setting in Power Options allows users to specify the lower busy threshold that must be met before decreasing the processor’s performance state (in percentage).

This tutorial will show you how to add or remove the Processor performance decrease threshold setting under Processor power management in Power Options for all users in Windows 7, Windows 8, and Windows 10.

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Add or Remove ‘Processor performance increase threshold’ from Power Options in Windows

The Processor performance increase threshold setting in Power Options allows users to specify the upper busy threshold that must be met before increasing the processor’s performance state (in percentage).

This tutorial will show you how to add or remove the Processor performance increase threshold setting under Processor power management in Power Options for all users in Windows 7, Windows 8, and Windows 10.

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How to Add or Remove ‘Allow system required policy’ from Power Options in Windows

The Allow system required policy setting in Power Options allows users to specify yes (default) or no to allow programs to prevent the computer from going to sleep automatically.

This tutorial will show you how to add or remove the Allow system required policy setting under Sleep in Power Options for all users in Windows 7, Windows 8, and Windows 10.

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How to Add or Remove ‘Hibernate after’ from Power Options in Windows

The Hibernate after setting in Power Options allows users to specify how long in minutes the computer is inactive (idle) before automatically hibernating.

If you disable hibernate, the Hibernate after setting in Power Options will not be available.

This tutorial will show you how to add or remove the Hibernate after setting under Sleep in Power Options for all users in Windows 7, Windows 8, and Windows 10.

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How to Add or Remove ‘Device idle policy’ from Power Options in Windows

The Device idle policy setting in Power Options determines whether power savings (conservation) idle timeouts or performance idle timeouts are used for devices powering down while the system is running. This is for devices that are integrated with Windows kernel power manager device idle detection.

This tutorial will show you how to add or remove the Device idle policy setting under Balanced in Power Options for all users in Windows 7, Windows 8, and Windows 10.

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How to Add or Remove ‘Reserve battery level’ from Power Options in Windows

The Battery group of settings in Power Options allows you to configure notification and action settings you want when the computer’s battery reaches a set low and critical level.

The Reserve battery level setting in Power Options allows users to specify the percentage of battery power remaining when the reserve battery warning is shown and initiates reserve power mode.

This tutorial will show you how to add or remove the Reserve battery level setting under Battery in Power Options for all users in Windows 7, Windows 8, and Windows 10.

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How to Add or Remove ‘Critical battery notification’ from Power Options in Windows 10

The Battery group of settings in Power Options allows you to configure notification and action settings you want when the computer’s battery reaches a set low and critical level.

The Critical battery notification setting in Power Options allows users to turn on or off whether a notification is shown when battery capacity reaches the Critical battery level.

This tutorial will show you how to add or remove the Critical battery notification setting under Battery in Power Options for all users in Windows 10.

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How to Add or Remove ‘Critical battery action’ from Power Options in Windows

The Battery group of settings in Power Options allows you to configure notification and action settings you want when the computer’s battery reaches a set low and critical level.

The Critical battery action setting in Power Options allows users to specify the action to take when battery capacity reaches the Critical battery level.

Users can specify the computer to do nothing, sleep, hibernate, or shut down when the critical battery level has been reached.

This tutorial will show you how to add or remove the Critical battery action setting under Battery in Power Options for all users in Windows 7, Windows 8, and Windows 10.

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