Windows 8.1

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How to Add Hash to Context Menu of Files in Windows 8 and Windows 10

The Hash context menu uses the native Get-FileHash cmdlet in PowerShell to compute the hash value for a file by using a specified hash algorithm. A hash value is a unique value that corresponds to the content of the file. Rather than identifying the contents of a file by its file name, extension, or other designation, a hash assigns a unique value to the contents of a file. File names and extensions can be changed without altering the content of the file, and without changing the hash value. Similarly, the file’s content can be changed without changing the name or extension. However, changing even a single character in the contents of a file changes the hash value of the file.

The purpose of hash values is to provide a cryptographically-secure way to verify that the contents of a file have not been changed. While some hash algorithms, including MD5 and SHA1, are no longer considered secure against attack, the goal of a secure hash algorithm is to render it impossible to change the contents of a file-either by accident, or by malicious or unauthorized attempt-and maintain the same hash value. You can also use hash values to determine if two different files have exactly the same content. If the hash values of two files are identical, the contents of the files are also identical.

The Hash context menu allows you to quickly see the SHA1, SHA256, SHA384, SHA512, MACTripleDES, MD5, and RIPEMD160 hash value of files.

This tutorial will show you how to add or remove Hash to the context menu of all files for all users in Windows 8 and Windows 10.

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How to Add or Remove ‘Manage BitLocker’ Context Menu from Drives in Windows

You can use BitLocker Drive Encryption to help protect your files on an entire drive. BitLocker can help block hackers from accessing the system files they rely on to discover your password, or from accessing your drive by physically removing it from your PC and installing it in a different one. You can still sign in to Windows and use your files as you normally would.

BitLocker can encrypt the drive Windows is installed on (the operating system drive) as well as fixed data drives (such as internal hard drives). You can also use BitLocker To Go to help protect all files stored on a removable data drive (such as an external hard drive or USB flash drive).

After a drive has been encrypted and protected with BitLocker, administrators can either right click on the drive in explorer and click/tap on Manage BitLocker OR use the Manage BitLocker page in the BitLocker Drive Encryption item in Control Panel to turn off BitLocker for the drive, suspend or resume BitLocker protection for the drive, change the password to unlock the drive, remove the password from the drive, add a smart card to unlock the drive, back up the recovery key, automatically unlock the drive, and reset the PIN.

This tutorial will show you how to add or remove the Manage BitLocker context menu from all unlocked drives encrypted by BitLocker for all users in Windows 7, Windows 8, and Windows 10.

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How to Add or Remove ‘Turn off BitLocker’ Context Menu from Drives in Windows

You can use BitLocker Drive Encryption to help protect your files on an entire drive. BitLocker can help block hackers from accessing the system files they rely on to discover your password, or from accessing your drive by physically removing it from your PC and installing it in a different one. You can still sign in to Windows and use your files as you normally would.

BitLocker can encrypt the drive Windows is installed on (the operating system drive) as well as fixed data drives (such as internal hard drives). You can also use BitLocker To Go to help protect all files stored on a removable data drive (such as an external hard drive or USB flash drive).

This tutorial will show you how to add or remove a Turn off BitLocker context menu for all fixed, OS, and removable drives encrypted by BitLocker for all users in Windows 7, Windows 8, and Windows 10.

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How to Change Default Drag and Drop Action in Windows

When you drag and drop files and folders in Windows, they will get moved or copied by default based on the source and destination locations.

• If you drag and drop a file/folder from a location on one drive to another drive, then the default action will be to copy the file/folder to the drop location.
• If you drag and drop a file/folder from a local location to a network location, then the default action will be to copy the file/folder to the drop location.
• If you drag and drop a file/folder from or to a CD/DVD or Blu-ray, then the default action will always be to copy the file/folder to the drop location. This cannot be changed.
• If you drag and drop a file/folder from a location to another on the same drive, then the default action will be to move the file/folder to the drop location.
• If you drag and drop a file/folder to the Recycle Bin, then the default action will always be to move the file/folder to the drop location. This cannot be changed.

This tutorial will show you how to change the default drag and drop action to always copy, move, or create shortcut for all users in Vista, Windows 7, Windows 8, and Windows 10.

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How to Customize Details of Shortcut Tooltips in Windows

When you hover over a shortcut of a file, folder, or drive in Windows, a tooltip will show displaying basic property details (metadata) such as the shortcut’s location.

A prop: value indicates a individual property or metadata within the Windows Property System that can be set for shortcut tooltips. You can customize the prop: value for shortcut tooltips to show any property details you like in the tooltip. The details you set to show in the tooltip will only show if the property or metadata is available for the shortcut.

This tutorial will show you how to customize shortcut tooltips to show any file and folder property details you want in the tooltip for all users in Vista, Windows 7, Windows 8, and Windows 10.

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How to Fix ‘Click here to enter your most recent credential’ in Windows 8 and Windows 10

If you change the password, reset the password, or change the primary alias of your Microsoft account, then you may get a Click here to enter your most recent credential notification the next time you sign in to your Microsoft account on a trusted Windows 8 or Windows 10 PC.

The “Click here to enter your most recent credential” notification is to verify your identity again on the PC by asking you to enter your password after clicking/tapping on the notification.

Sometimes the “Click here to enter your most recent credential notification” will keep showing despite entering the correct password for your Microsoft account.

This tutorial will show you how to stop the Click here to enter your most recent credential. Your Microsoft account needs you to sign in again. notification for your Microsoft account in Windows 8 and Windows 10.

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How to Customize Delete Confirmation Dialog Prompt Details in Windows

When you delete a single file or folder, the delete confirmation dialog displays basic details (metadata) like the file or folder name, date created, file type, and date modified by default, but will vary with each file type.

A prop: value indicates a individual property or metadata within the Windows Property System that can be set on files/folders. You can customize the prop: value for the delete confirmation dialog to show any file and folder details you like in the prompt. The details you set to show in the prompt will only show if the property or metadata is available for the deleted file or folder.

This tutorial will show you how to customize the delete confirmation dialog to show any file and folder details you want in the prompt for all users in Vista, Windows 7, Windows 8, and Windows 10.

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How to Change Default Shortcut Name Extension Template in Windows 7, 8, and 10

A shortcut is a link to an item (such as a file, folder, or app) on your PC.

When you right click or press and hold on a file, folder, or drive and click tap on either Create shortcut or Send to -> Desktop (create shortcut), a shortcut to that file, folder or drive will be created with the – Shortcut extension at the end of the filename by default.

This tutorial will show you how to change the shortcut name extension template to what you want for your account in Windows 7, Windows 8, and Windows 10.

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How to Change Default New Folder Name Template in Windows 10

A folder is a location where you can store your files. You can create any number of folders and even store folders inside other folders (subfolders).

When you create a new folder, it is named New folder by default.

This tutorial will show you how to change the New folder name template to be able to create new folders with a custom name by default for your account in Windows 10.

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Enable or Disable to Format with ReFS File System in Windows 8.1 and Windows 10

Resilient File System (ReFS) is a new local file system. It maximizes data availability, despite errors that would historically cause data loss or downtime. Data integrity ensures that business critical data is protected from errors and available when needed. Its architecture is designed to provide scalability and performance in an era of constantly growing data set sizes and dynamic workloads.

This tutorial will show you how to enable or disable the ability to format drives with ReFS (Resilient File System) in Windows 8.1 and Windows 10.

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How to Check if Last Boot was from Fast Startup, Full Shutdown, or Hibernate

Users in Windows 8, Windows 8.1, and Windows 10 are able to perform a hybrid shutdown (fast startup), a full shutdown, or hibernate on the PC.

Fast startup (aka: hiberboot, hybrid boot, or hybrid shutdown) is turned on by default in Windows and is a setting that helps your PC start up faster after shutdown. Even faster than hibernate.

Hibernate is a power-saving state designed primarily for laptops, and might not be available for all PCs (PCs with InstantGo don’t have the hibernate option). Hibernate uses less power than sleep and when you start up the PC again, you’re back to where you left off (though not as fast as sleep). Use hibernation when you know that you won’t use your laptop or tablet for an extended period and won’t have an opportunity to charge the battery during that time.

A full shutdown will close all apps, sign out all users, and completely turn off the PC. A full shutdown is good to use if you don’t plan to use your PC for an extended period and wanted to completely power off the PC.

This tutorial will show you how to check if the last boot was from a hybrid shutdown (fast startup), full shutdown, or resume from hibernate in Windows 8, Windows 8.1, and Windows 10.

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How to Enable AHCI in Windows 8 and Windows 10 after Installation

AHCI (Advanced Host Controller Interface) makes NCQ (Native Command Queuing) along with hot-plugging or hot swapping through SATA Serial-ATA host controllers possible

Usually today’s motherboards will have AHCI enabled in UEFI or BIOS by default. Some older motherboards may have IDE enabled by default instead.

If you wanted to install Windows using AHCI instead of IDE, then you would normally need to have AHCI enabled in BIOS/UEFI first.

This tutorial will show you how to enable AHCI in Windows 8/8.1 and Windows 10 after you have already installed the OS (operating system) with IDE by mistake.

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Enable or Disable Upgrade to Windows 10 in Windows Update for Windows 7 and 8.1

Microsoft is making Windows 10 available for free for one year from the date of availability. This offer is available to customers who are using non-Enterprise, non-Embedded editions of Windows 7 and Windows 8.1.

If you like, you can disable the Upgrade to Windows 10 update to no longer have the update available in Windows Update.

This tutorial will show you how to enable or disable the Upgrade to Windows 10 update in Windows 7 and Windows 8.1.

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How to Cancel Reservation for Free Upgrade to Windows 10 in Get Windows 10 app

On June 1st 2015, qualifying Windows 7 and Windows 8.1 PCs and tablets will start seeing the Get Windows 10 icon in their taskbar notification area to be able to reserve your free upgrade to Windows 10 today for when released on July 29th 2015.

When you reserve, you can confirm your device is compatible with Windows 10. Between reservation and when your upgrade is ready, the files you need for the upgrade will be downloaded to your PC to make the final installation go more quickly. Then, when your upgrade is ready after July 29, 2015, you get a notification that lets you get started with your upgrade.

You can cancel your reservation at any time prior to installing Windows 10.

This tutorial will show you how to cancel your reservation for a free upgrade to Windows 10 from Windows 7 or Windows 8.1 in the Get Windows 10 app.

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How to Remove ‘Get Windows 10’ Reserve Icon from Taskbar in Windows 7 and 8.1

On June 1st 2015, qualifying Windows 7 and Windows 8.1 PCs and tablets will start seeing the Get Windows 10 icon in their taskbar notification area to be able to reserve your free upgrade to Windows 10 when released on July 29th 2015.

The KB3035583 Windows Update is responsible for adding Get Windows 10 to Windows 7 and Windows 8.1 PCs and tablets. Originally the KB3035583 update was optional to install. Microsoft has now changed KB3035583 to be recommended, which will have KB3035583 download and install automatically.

This tutorial will show you how to hide or remove the ‘Get Windows 10’ icon on the taskbar in Windows 7 and Windows 8.1 if you do not wish to reserve your free upgrade to Windows 10 when released.

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