Windows 8 – Page 23 – Windows Blog by Brink

Windows 8

How to Add Desktop Background File Location context menu in Windows 8 and Windows 10

Your desktop background (also called wallpaper) can be a picture from your personal collection, Bing Desktop, or included with Windows, a solid color, or a slide show playing selected pictures randomly on all displays.

The Desktop Background File Location context menu will open directly to the image file location of your current desktop background with the image highlighted. This can be very handy if you see an image on your desktop background you would like to find and save.

This tutorial will show you how to add or remove the Desktop Background File Location context menu for all users in Windows 8 and Windows 10.

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How to Add or Remove ‘Manage BitLocker’ Context Menu from Drives in Windows

You can use BitLocker Drive Encryption to help protect your files on an entire drive. BitLocker can help block hackers from accessing the system files they rely on to discover your password, or from accessing your drive by physically removing it from your PC and installing it in a different one. You can still sign in to Windows and use your files as you normally would.

BitLocker can encrypt the drive Windows is installed on (the operating system drive) as well as fixed data drives (such as internal hard drives). You can also use BitLocker To Go to help protect all files stored on a removable data drive (such as an external hard drive or USB flash drive).

After a drive has been encrypted and protected with BitLocker, administrators can either right click on the drive in explorer and click/tap on Manage BitLocker OR use the Manage BitLocker page in the BitLocker Drive Encryption item in Control Panel to turn off BitLocker for the drive, suspend or resume BitLocker protection for the drive, change the password to unlock the drive, remove the password from the drive, add a smart card to unlock the drive, back up the recovery key, automatically unlock the drive, and reset the PIN.

This tutorial will show you how to add or remove the Manage BitLocker context menu from all unlocked drives encrypted by BitLocker for all users in Windows 7, Windows 8, and Windows 10.

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How to Add or Remove ‘Turn off BitLocker’ Context Menu from Drives in Windows

You can use BitLocker Drive Encryption to help protect your files on an entire drive. BitLocker can help block hackers from accessing the system files they rely on to discover your password, or from accessing your drive by physically removing it from your PC and installing it in a different one. You can still sign in to Windows and use your files as you normally would.

BitLocker can encrypt the drive Windows is installed on (the operating system drive) as well as fixed data drives (such as internal hard drives). You can also use BitLocker To Go to help protect all files stored on a removable data drive (such as an external hard drive or USB flash drive).

This tutorial will show you how to add or remove a Turn off BitLocker context menu for all fixed, OS, and removable drives encrypted by BitLocker for all users in Windows 7, Windows 8, and Windows 10.

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How to Add ‘Suspend BitLocker protection’ to Context Menu of Drives in Windows

BitLocker can encrypt the drive Windows is installed on (the operating system drive) as well as fixed data drives (such as internal hard drives). You can also use BitLocker To Go to help protect all files stored on a removable data drive (such as an external hard drive or USB flash drive).

You can temporarily suspend (pause) BitLocker protection whenever you like for an unlocked drive encrypted by BitLocker—for example, if you need to install new software that BitLocker might otherwise block—and then resume BitLocker protection on the drive again when you’re ready.

When you suspend BitLocker protection for an OS drive, it will remain unlocked and unprotected until you either manually resume BitLocker protection for the drive, or have it resume BitLocker protection automatically the next time you restart the PC.

When you suspend BitLocker protection for a fixed data drive, it will remain unlocked and unprotected until you manually resume BitLocker protection for the drive. This is even after you restart the PC.

When you suspend BitLocker protection for a removable data drive, it will remain unlocked and unprotected until you manually resume BitLocker protection for the drive. This is even after you restart the PC, or disconnect and reconnect the drive.

This tutorial will show you how to add Suspend BitLocker protection to the context menu of all unlocked drives encrypted by BitLocker for all users in Windows 7, Windows 8, and Windows 10.

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How to Change Default Drag and Drop Action in Windows

When you drag and drop files and folders in Windows, they will get moved or copied by default based on the source and destination locations.

• If you drag and drop a file/folder from a location on one drive to another drive, then the default action will be to copy the file/folder to the drop location.
• If you drag and drop a file/folder from a local location to a network location, then the default action will be to copy the file/folder to the drop location.
• If you drag and drop a file/folder from or to a CD/DVD or Blu-ray, then the default action will always be to copy the file/folder to the drop location. This cannot be changed.
• If you drag and drop a file/folder from a location to another on the same drive, then the default action will be to move the file/folder to the drop location.
• If you drag and drop a file/folder to the Recycle Bin, then the default action will always be to move the file/folder to the drop location. This cannot be changed.

This tutorial will show you how to change the default drag and drop action to always copy, move, or create shortcut for all users in Vista, Windows 7, Windows 8, and Windows 10.

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How to Customize Details of Shortcut Tooltips in Windows

When you hover over a shortcut of a file, folder, or drive in Windows, a tooltip will show displaying basic property details (metadata) such as the shortcut’s location.

A prop: value indicates a individual property or metadata within the Windows Property System that can be set for shortcut tooltips. You can customize the prop: value for shortcut tooltips to show any property details you like in the tooltip. The details you set to show in the tooltip will only show if the property or metadata is available for the shortcut.

This tutorial will show you how to customize shortcut tooltips to show any file and folder property details you want in the tooltip for all users in Vista, Windows 7, Windows 8, and Windows 10.

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How to Fix ‘Click here to enter your most recent credential’ in Windows 8 and Windows 10

If you change the password, reset the password, or change the primary alias of your Microsoft account, then you may get a Click here to enter your most recent credential notification the next time you sign in to your Microsoft account on a trusted Windows 8 or Windows 10 PC.

The “Click here to enter your most recent credential” notification is to verify your identity again on the PC by asking you to enter your password after clicking/tapping on the notification.

Sometimes the “Click here to enter your most recent credential notification” will keep showing despite entering the correct password for your Microsoft account.

This tutorial will show you how to stop the Click here to enter your most recent credential. Your Microsoft account needs you to sign in again. notification for your Microsoft account in Windows 8 and Windows 10.

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How to Check if Windows PC has a Trusted Platform Module (TPM) Chip

Trusted Platform Module (TPM) technology is designed to provide hardware-based, security-related functions. A TPM chip is a secure crypto-processor that is designed to carry out cryptographic operations. The chip includes multiple physical security mechanisms to make it tamper resistant, and malicious software is unable to tamper with the security functions of the TPM. Some of the key advantages of using TPM technology are that you can:

•Generate, store, and limit the use of cryptographic keys.
•Use TPM technology for platform device authentication by using the TPM’s unique RSA key, which is burned into itself.
•Help ensure platform integrity by taking and storing security measurements.

The most common TPM functions are used for system integrity measurements and for key creation and use. During the boot process of a system, the boot code that is loaded (including firmware and the operating system components) can be measured and recorded in the TPM. The integrity measurements can be used as evidence for how a system started and to make sure that a TPM-based key was used only when the correct software was used to boot the system.

TPM-based keys can be configured in a variety of ways. One option is to make a TPM-based key unavailable outside the TPM. This is good to mitigate phishing attacks because it prevents the key from being copied and used without the TPM. TPM-based keys can also be configured to require an authorization value to use them. If too many incorrect authorization guesses occur, the TPM will activate its dictionary attack logic and prevent further authorization value guesses.

Different versions of the TPM are defined in specifications by the Trusted Computing Group (TCG).

Windows can automatically provision and manage the TPM. Group Policy settings can be configured to control whether the TPM owner authorization value is backed up in Active Directory. Because the TPM state persists across operating system installations, TPM information is stored in a location in Active Directory that is separate from computer objects. Depending on an enterprise’s security goals, Group Policy can be configured to allow or prevent local administrators from resetting the TPM’s dictionary attack logic. Standard users can use the TPM, but Group Policy controls limit how many authorization failures standard users can attempt so that one user is unable to prevent other users or the administrator from using the TPM. TPM technology can also be used as a virtual smart card and for secure certificate storage. With BitLocker Network Unlock, domain-joined computers are not prompted for a BitLocker PIN.

This tutorial will show you how to check if your Windows PC has a Trusted Platform Module (TPM) security hardware chip, and what version if available.

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How to Customize Delete Confirmation Dialog Prompt Details in Windows

When you delete a single file or folder, the delete confirmation dialog displays basic details (metadata) like the file or folder name, date created, file type, and date modified by default, but will vary with each file type.

A prop: value indicates a individual property or metadata within the Windows Property System that can be set on files/folders. You can customize the prop: value for the delete confirmation dialog to show any file and folder details you like in the prompt. The details you set to show in the prompt will only show if the property or metadata is available for the deleted file or folder.

This tutorial will show you how to customize the delete confirmation dialog to show any file and folder details you want in the prompt for all users in Vista, Windows 7, Windows 8, and Windows 10.

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How to Clear Product Key from Registry in Windows

When you install and activate a retail copy of Windows, the product key is stored in the registry. This can be helpful to be able to use a program like ShowKeyPlus to view your installed product key if lost.

However, having your installed product key in the registry could leave it vulnerable to being stolen from disclosure attacks by malicious software. Clearing the product key from the registry will prevent this, but you will need to make sure to keep a copy of your product key written down and kept in a secure location.

This tutorial will show you how to permanently clear the product key from the registry to prevent it from being stolen in Vista, Windows 7, Windows 8, and Windows 10.

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How to Change Default Shortcut Name Extension Template in Windows 7, 8, and 10

A shortcut is a link to an item (such as a file, folder, or app) on your PC.

When you right click or press and hold on a file, folder, or drive and click tap on either Create shortcut or Send to -> Desktop (create shortcut), a shortcut to that file, folder or drive will be created with the – Shortcut extension at the end of the filename by default.

This tutorial will show you how to change the shortcut name extension template to what you want for your account in Windows 7, Windows 8, and Windows 10.

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How to Change Default New Folder Name Template in Windows 10

A folder is a location where you can store your files. You can create any number of folders and even store folders inside other folders (subfolders).

When you create a new folder, it is named New folder by default.

This tutorial will show you how to change the New folder name template to be able to create new folders with a custom name by default for your account in Windows 10.

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How to Check if Last Boot was from Fast Startup, Full Shutdown, or Hibernate

Users in Windows 8, Windows 8.1, and Windows 10 are able to perform a hybrid shutdown (fast startup), a full shutdown, or hibernate on the PC.

Fast startup (aka: hiberboot, hybrid boot, or hybrid shutdown) is turned on by default in Windows and is a setting that helps your PC start up faster after shutdown. Even faster than hibernate.

Hibernate is a power-saving state designed primarily for laptops, and might not be available for all PCs (PCs with InstantGo don’t have the hibernate option). Hibernate uses less power than sleep and when you start up the PC again, you’re back to where you left off (though not as fast as sleep). Use hibernation when you know that you won’t use your laptop or tablet for an extended period and won’t have an opportunity to charge the battery during that time.

A full shutdown will close all apps, sign out all users, and completely turn off the PC. A full shutdown is good to use if you don’t plan to use your PC for an extended period and wanted to completely power off the PC.

This tutorial will show you how to check if the last boot was from a hybrid shutdown (fast startup), full shutdown, or resume from hibernate in Windows 8, Windows 8.1, and Windows 10.

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How to Enable AHCI in Windows 8 and Windows 10 after Installation

AHCI (Advanced Host Controller Interface) makes NCQ (Native Command Queuing) along with hot-plugging or hot swapping through SATA Serial-ATA host controllers possible

Usually today’s motherboards will have AHCI enabled in UEFI or BIOS by default. Some older motherboards may have IDE enabled by default instead.

If you wanted to install Windows using AHCI instead of IDE, then you would normally need to have AHCI enabled in BIOS/UEFI first.

This tutorial will show you how to enable AHCI in Windows 8/8.1 and Windows 10 after you have already installed the OS (operating system) with IDE by mistake.

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How to Use Malicious Software Removal Tool in Windows

The Microsoft Windows Malicious Software Removal Tool (MSRT) helps remove malicious software from your computers that are running Windows 10 Technical Preview, Windows 8.1, Windows Server 2012 R2, Windows 8, Windows Server 2012, Windows 7, Windows Vista, Windows Server 2003, Windows Server 2008, or Windows XP.

The Microsoft Malicious Software Removal Tool does not replace an antivirus product. It is strictly a post-infection removal tool. Therefore, we strongly recommend that you install and use an up-to-date antivirus product. If you like, Windows 10 already has Windows Defender included for antivirus.

The Microsoft Malicious Software Removal Tool differs from an antivirus product in three key ways:

•The tool removes malicious software from an already-infected computer. Antivirus products block malicious software from running on a computer. It is significantly more desirable to block malicious software from running on a computer than to remove it after infection.
•The tool removes only specific prevalent malicious software. Specific prevalent malicious software is a small subset of all the malicious software that exists today.
•The tool focuses on the detection and removal of active malicious software. Active malicious software is malicious software that is currently running on the computer. The tool cannot remove malicious software that is not running. However, an antivirus product can perform this task.

This tutorial will show you how to open and use the Malicious Software Removal Tool (MSRT) to scan and remove specific prevalent malicious software in Windows.

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