Windows Update – Windows Blog by Brink

Windows Update

Turn On or Off “Get me up to date” for Windows Update in Windows 11

In Windows 11, you decide when and how to get the latest updates to keep your device running smoothly and securely. When you update, you’ll get the latest fixes and security improvements, helping your device run efficiently and stay protected. In most cases, restarting your device completes the update.

You can turn on Get me up to date to restart as soon as possible (even during active hours) to finish updating, and notify you 15 minutes before restarting so you can make sure your device is on an plugged in.

This tutorial will show you how to turn on or off “Get me up to date” for Windows Update in Windows 11.

Read more…

Check for Windows 11 Updates

In Windows 11, you decide when and how to get the latest updates to keep your device running smoothly and securely. When you update, you’ll get the latest fixes and security improvements, helping your device run efficiently and stay protected. In most cases, restarting your device completes the update. Make sure your device is plugged in when you know updates will be installed.

Windows 11 offers you the choice of when and how to get the latest updates to keep your device running smoothly and securely. If you’re not ready to get recommended updates, you can choose to temporarily pause them from being downloaded and installed.

Feature updates are typically released twice per year and include new functionality and capabilities as well as potential fixes and security updates. Quality updates are more frequent and mainly include small fixes and security updates. Windows is designed to deliver both kinds of updates to devices through Windows Update.

This tutorial will show yo how to manually check for and install updates in Windows Update in Windows 11.

Read more…

Specify Target Feature Update Version in Windows 11

Windows Update keeps Windows 11 updated by automatically downloading and installing the latest updates, drivers, and hotfixes released by Microsoft.

The TargetReleaseVersion policy allows you to specify which feature update version of Windows 11 you would like your computer to move to and/or stay on until the version reaches end of service or you reconfigure this policy.

If you don’t update this policy before the device reaches end of service, the device will automatically be updated once it is 60 days past end of service for its version.

If you specify a TargetReleaseVersion the same as the current version, Windows 11 will stay on this version until it reaches end of service.

If you specify a TargetReleaseVersion higher than the current version, Windows 11 will directly update only to the specified version even if a higher version is available.

This tutorial will show you how to specify a TargetReleaseVersion version of Windows 11 you want to move to or stay on in Windows Update until it reaches end of service in Windows 11 Pro, Enterprise, or Education.

Read more…

Reset Windows Update in Windows 11

Windows Update keeps Windows 11 updated by automatically downloading and installing the latest updates, drivers, and hotfixes released by Microsoft.

Sometimes you may have an issue with Windows Update such as not being able to download or install updates, error messages, not being able to search for new updates, etc. These kind of issues can occur when the Windows Update database or components are corrupted, one or more services related to Windows Update are not running, etc.

Resetting the Windows Update components can usually solve these types of issues.

Read more…

View Delivery Optimization Activity Monitor in Windows 11

Windows Update Delivery Optimization helps you get Windows updates and Microsoft Store apps more quickly and reliably.

Windows Update Delivery Optimization works by letting you get Windows updates and Microsoft Store apps from sources in addition to Microsoft, like other PCs on your local network, or PCs on the internet that are downloading the same files. Delivery Optimization also sends updates and apps from your PC to other PCs on your local network or PCs on the internet, based on your settings. Sharing this data between PCs helps reduce the internet bandwidth that’s needed to keep more than one device up to date or can make downloads more successful if you have a limited or unreliable Internet connection.

When Windows downloads an update or app using Delivery Optimization, it will look for other PCs on your local network (or from the internet, depending on your settings) that have already downloaded that update or app. Windows doesn’t download the entire file from one place. Instead, the download is broken down into smaller parts. Windows then gets parts of the update or app from the PCs that have it, and parts from Microsoft. Windows uses the fastest, most reliable download source for each part.

Delivery Optimization creates a local cache, and stores files that it has downloaded in that cache for a short period of time.

Delivery Optimization can’t be used to download or send personal content. Delivery Optimization doesn’t access your personal files or folders, and it doesn’t change any files on your PC.

Delivery Optimization downloads the same updates and apps that you would get through Windows Update and Microsoft Store, using the same security measures. To make sure you’re getting authentic updates, Delivery Optimization gets information securely from Microsoft to check the authenticity of each part of an update or app that it downloads from other PCs. The authenticity of the downloads is checked again before installing it.

Find out what you’re getting from other PCs—and what your PC is contributing—with Activity Monitor. You’ll see a breakdown of downloads by source, average speed, and upload stats, all for the current month. It’ll even tell you how much of a boost your PC is getting from other PCs on the Internet.

The download and upload statistics data only reflects the bandwidth used since the first day of the current month in Activity Monitor.

This tutorial will show you how to see download and upload statistics in Activity Monitor for Delivery Optimization on your Windows 11 PC.

Read more…

Set Active Hours for Windows Update in Windows 11

Windows Update keeps Windows 11 updated by automatically downloading and installing the latest updates, drivers, and hotfixes released by Microsoft.

Active hours let Windows know when you’re typically at your PC. Windows will use that info to schedule updates and restarts when you’re not using the PC.

The default active hours is 8 AM (8 on 24 hour clock) for Start time and 5 PM (17 on 24 hour clock) End time.

This tutorial will show you how to set active hours for when you use your PC to not automatically restart your Windows 11 PC during this time to finish installing a Windows Update.

Read more…

 

View Update History in Windows 11

Windows Update keeps Windows 11 updated by automatically downloading and installing the latest updates, drivers, and hotfixes released by Microsoft.

You can view Windows Update history to see which Feature Updates, Quality Updates, Driver Updates, Definition Updates, and Other Updates have been installed and when on your Windows 11 computer.

Feature updates are typically released twice per year and include new functionality and capabilities as well as potential fixes and security updates.

Quality updates are more frequent and mainly include small fixes and security updates.

This tutorial will show you how to view update history to see which Windows Updates failed or successfully installed on your Windows 11 PC.

Read more…

Uninstall Updates in Windows 11

Windows Update keeps Windows 11 updated by automatically downloading and installing the latest updates, drivers, and hotfixes released by Microsoft.

While it is not recommended to uninstall any installed updates, you can uninstall an update if it causing issues.

This tutorial will show you how to uninstall a Windows Update in Windows 11.

Read more…

Turn On or Off Windows Update Delivery Optimization in Windows 11

Windows Update Delivery Optimization helps you get Windows updates and Microsoft Store apps more quickly and reliably.

Windows Update Delivery Optimization works by letting you get Windows updates and Microsoft Store apps from sources in addition to Microsoft, like other PCs on your local network, or PCs on the internet that are downloading the same files. Delivery Optimization also sends updates and apps from your PC to other PCs on your local network or PCs on the internet, based on your settings. Sharing this data between PCs helps reduce the internet bandwidth that’s needed to keep more than one device up to date or can make downloads more successful if you have a limited or unreliable Internet connection.

When Windows downloads an update or app using Delivery Optimization, it will look for other PCs on your local network (or from the internet, depending on your settings) that have already downloaded that update or app. Windows doesn’t download the entire file from one place. Instead, the download is broken down into smaller parts. Windows then gets parts of the update or app from the PCs that have it, and parts from Microsoft. Windows uses the fastest, most reliable download source for each part.

Delivery Optimization creates a local cache, and stores files that it has downloaded in that cache for a short period of time.

Delivery Optimization can’t be used to download or send personal content. Delivery Optimization doesn’t access your personal files or folders, and it doesn’t change any files on your PC.

Delivery Optimization downloads the same updates and apps that you would get through Windows Update and Microsoft Store, using the same security measures. To make sure you’re getting authentic updates, Delivery Optimization gets information securely from Microsoft to check the authenticity of each part of an update or app that it downloads from other PCs. The authenticity of the downloads is checked again before installing it.

This tutorial will show you how to turn on or off allow downloads from other PCs for Delivery Optimization in Windows 11.

Read more…

Enable or Disable Pause Updates Feature in Windows 11

Windows Update keeps Windows 11 updated by automatically downloading and installing the latest updates, drivers, and hotfixes released by Microsoft.

If you have a Windows Insider build of Windows 11 installed, you can only pause updates for 1 week (7 days) until updates automatically resume.

If you do not have a Windows Insider build of Windows 11 installed, you can pause updates for up to 5 weeks (35 days) until updates automatically resume.

Some updates, like Microsoft Defender definition updates, will continue to be installed.

When updates resume, your device will need to get the latest updates before it can be paused again.

This tutorial will show you how to enable or disable the pause updates feature of Windows Update for Windows 11.

Read more…

Turn On or Off Receive Updates for Other Microsoft Products in Windows 11

Windows Update keeps Windows 11 updated by automatically downloading and installing the latest updates, drivers, and hotfixes released by Microsoft.

You can have Windows 11 receive updates for other Microsoft products and software, like Office, when you update Windows.

This tutorial will show you how to turn on or off Receive updates for other Microsoft products when you update Windows in Windows 11.

Read more…

Enable or Disable Auto-restart Notifications for Windows Update in Windows 11

Windows Update keeps Windows 11 updated by automatically downloading and installing the latest updates, drivers, and hotfixes released by Microsoft.

You can turn on or off to show a notification when your device requires a restart to finish updating.

This tutorial will show you how to enable or disable showing auto-restart notifications for Windows Update in Windows 11.

Read more…

Clear Windows Update History in Windows 11

Windows Update keeps Windows 11 updated by automatically downloading and installing the latest updates, drivers, and hotfixes released by Microsoft.

You can view Windows Update history to see which Feature Updates, Quality Updates, Driver Updates, Definition Updates, and Other Updates have been installed on your Windows 11 computer.

Sometimes you may need or want to clear your Windows Update history on demand.

This tutorial will show you how to clear the Windows Update history on your Windows 11 PC.

Read more…

Enable or Disable Download Updates over Metered Connections in Windows 11

By default, Windows Update in Windows 11 will automatically download and install updates, except on metered connections where extra charges may apply. In that case, Windows Update will automatically download only those updates requited to keep Windows running smoothly.

If wanted, you are able to allow Windows Update to automatically download updates over metered connections.

This tutorial will show you how to enable or disable Windows Update to automatically download updates over metered connections in Windows 11.

Read more…

Enable or Disable Safeguard Holds for Feature Updates in Windows 11

Feature updates are new versions of Windows that are released via Windows Update twice a year usually around spring and fall.

Microsoft uses quality and compatibility data to identify issues that might cause a Windows client feature update to fail or roll back. When Microsoft finds such an issue, Microsoft might apply holds to the updating service to prevent affected devices from installing the update in order to safeguard them from these experiences. Microsoft also use holds when a customer, a partner, or Microsoft internal validation finds an issue that would cause severe impact (for example, rollback of the update, data loss, loss of connectivity, or loss of key functionality) and when a workaround is not immediately available.

Safeguard holds prevent a device with a known issue from being offered a new operating system version. Microsoft renews the offering once a fix is found and verified. Microsoft use holds to ensure customers have a successful experience as their device moves to a new version of Windows client.

On devices that use Windows Update (but not Windows Update for Business), the Windows Update page in the Settings app displays a message stating that a feature update is on its way, but not ready for the device. Instead of the option to download and install the feature update, users will see a “Learn more” message. If you see this message, it means one or more holds affect your device.

The lifespan of holds varies depending on the time required to investigate and fix an issue. During this time Microsoft works diligently to procure, develop, and validate a fix and then offer it to affected devices. Microsoft monitors quality and compatibility data to confirm that a fix is complete before releasing the hold. Once Microsoft releases the hold, Windows Update will resume offering new operating system versions to devices.

If wanted, you can enable the Disable safeguards for Feature Updates Group Policy to allow Feature Updates without blocking on any safeguard holds.

This tutorial will show you how to enable or disable safeguard holds for feature updates in Windows 10 and Windows 11.

Read more…

 

Pause and Resume Updates for Windows 11

Windows Update keeps Windows 11 updated by automatically downloading and installing the latest updates, drivers, and hotfixes released by Microsoft.

If you have a Windows Insider build of Windows 11 installed, you can only pause updates for 1 week (7 days) until updates automatically resume.

If you do not have a Windows Insider build of Windows 11 installed, you can pause updates for up to 5 weeks (35 days) until updates automatically resume.

Some updates, like Microsoft Defender definition updates, will continue to be installed.

When updates resume, your device will need to get the latest updates before it can be paused again.

This tutorial will show you how to pause and resume updates for Windows 11.

Read more…

How to Disable Safeguard Holds for Feature Updates on Windows 10

Feature updates are new versions of Windows 10 that are released via Windows Update twice a year usually around spring and fall.

Microsoft uses quality and compatibility data to identify issues that might cause a Windows 10 feature update to fail or roll back. When Microsoft finds such an issue, Microsoft might apply holds to the updating service to prevent affected devices from installing the update in order to safeguard them from these experiences. Microsoft also use holds when a customer, a partner, or Microsoft internal validation finds an issue that would cause severe impact (for example, rollback of the update, data loss, loss of connectivity, or loss of key functionality) and when a workaround is not immediately available.

Safeguard holds prevent a device with a known issue from being offered a new operating system version. Microsoft will renew the offering once a fix is found and verified. Microsoft uses holds to ensure customers have a successful experience as their device moves to a new version of Windows 10.

The lifespan of holds varies depending on the time required to investigate and fix an issue. During this time Microsoft works diligently to procure, develop, and validate a fix and then offer it to affected devices. We monitor quality and compatibility data to confirm that a fix is complete before releasing the hold. Once Microsoft releases the hold, Windows Update will resume offering new operating system versions to devices.

Safeguard holds only affect devices that use the Window Update service for updates.

If necessary, you can opt out of safeguard protections by using the Disable safeguards for Feature Updates Group Policy. This policy is available to Windows Update for Business devices running Windows 10 version 1809 or later that have installed its October 2020 security update (not to be confused with the Windows 10 October 2020 Update).

This tutorial will show you how to enable or disable safeguard holds for feature updates on Windows 10.

Read more…

Enable or Disable Microsoft Defender Antivirus Updates Over Metered Connections in Windows 10

Windows 10 includes Windows Security, which provides the latest Microsoft Defender Antivirus protection. Your device will be actively protected from the moment you start Windows 10. Windows Security continually scans for malware (malicious software), viruses, and security threats. In addition to this real-time protection, definition updates are downloaded automatically to help keep your device safe and protect it from threats.

If you disabled automatic Windows Updates over metered connections, it will also prevent Microsoft Defender Antivirus definition updates from being automatically installed via Windows Update over a metered connection.

Starting with Windows 10 build 20175, a new group policy was added that allows Microsoft Defender to update and communicate over a metered connection even if you disabled automatic Windows Updates over metered connections.

This tutorial will show you how to enable or disable allowing Microsoft Defender Antivirus to update and communicate over a metered connection in Windows 10.

Read more…