Windows Update

How to Enable or Disable Allow Automatically Download Updates over Metered Connections in Windows 10

By default, Windows Update in Windows 10 will automatically download and install updates, except on metered connections where extra charges may apply. In that case, Windows Update will automatically download only those updates requited to keep Windows running smoothly.

If wanted, you are able to allow Windows Update to automatically download updates over metered connections.

This tutorial will show you how to enable or disable Windows Update to automatically download updates over metered connections in Windows 10.

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Windows 10 May 2019 Update rollout approach

While regular updates are critical to keeping modern devices secure and running smoothly in a diverse and dynamic ecosystem, we have heard clear feedback that the Windows update process itself can be disruptive, particularly that Windows users would like more control over when updates happen. Today we are excited to announce significant changes in the Windows update process, changes designed to improve the experience, put the user in more control, and improve the quality of Windows updates.

In previous Windows 10 feature update rollouts, the update installation was automatically initiated on a device once our data gave us confidence that device would have a great update experience. Beginning with the Windows 10 May 2019 Update, users will be more in control of initiating the feature OS update. We will provide notification that an update is available and recommended based on our data, but it will be largely up to the user to initiate when the update occurs. When Windows 10 devices are at, or will soon reach, end of service, Windows update will continue to automatically initiate a feature update; keeping machines supported and receiving monthly updates is critical to device security and ecosystem health. We are adding new features that will empower users with control and transparency around when updates are installed. In fact, all customers will now have the ability to explicitly choose if they want to update their device when they “check for updates” or to pause updates for up to 35 days.

We are taking further steps to be confident in the quality of the May 2019 Update. We will increase the amount of time that the May 2019 Update spends in the Release Preview phase, and we will work closely with ecosystem partners during this phase to proactively obtain more early feedback about this release. This will give us additional signals to detect issues before broader deployment. We are also continuing to make significant new investments in machine learning (ML) technology to both detect high-impact issues efficiently at scale and further evolve how we intelligently select devices that will have a smooth update experience.

I’m pleased to announce that the Windows 10 May 2019 Update will start to be available next week in the Release Preview Ring for those in the Windows Insider Program. We will begin broader availability in late May for commercial customers, users who choose the new May 2019 Update for their Windows 10 PC via “check for updates,” and customers whose devices are nearing the end of support on a given release.

I’d now like to share the details of our new update controls and the enhancements to our approach to transparency and quality coming with the May 2019 Update.

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How to Specify Deadlines for Automatic Updates and Restarts in Windows 10

Windows Update keeps Windows 10 updated by downloading and installing the latest updates, drivers, and hotfixes released by Microsoft.

Starting with Windows 10 version 1903, a new Specify deadlines for automatic updates and restarts group policy is available that lets you specify the number of days that a user has before quality and feature updates are installed on their devices automatically, and a grace period after which required restarts occur automatically. Updates and restarts will occur regardless of active hours, and the user will not be able to reschedule.

Deadlines for feature updates and quality updates can be up to 30 days. The auto-restart grace period can be from 0 to 7 days.

You can also disable auto-restarts until the end of the auto-restart grace period.

If you disable or do not configure this policy, devices will get updates and will restart according to the default schedule.

This policy will override the following policies:

1. Specify deadline before auto restart for update installation
2. Specify Engaged restart transition and notification schedule for updates
3. Always automatically restart at the scheduled time
4. No auto-restart with logged on users for scheduled automatic updates installation

This tutorial will show you how to specify deadlines for automatic updates and restarts for Windows Update in Windows 10.

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How to Check Reserved Storage Size for Windows Update in Windows 10

A new Reserved Storage feature is available to Windows Insiders running build 18298 or newer.

Starting with the next major update Microsoft is making a few changes to how Windows 10 manages disk space. Through reserved storage, some disk space will be set aside to be used by updates, apps, temporary files, and system caches. Microsoft’s goal is to improve the day-to-day function of your PC by ensuring critical OS functions always have access to disk space. Without reserved storage, if a user almost fills up her or his storage, several Windows and application scenarios become unreliable. Windows and application scenarios may not work as expected if they need free space to function. With reserved storage, updates, apps, temporary files, and caches are less likely to take away from valuable free space and should continue to operate as expected. Reserved storage will be introduced automatically on devices that come with version 1903 pre-installed or those where 1903 was clean installed. You don’t need to set anything up—this process will automatically run in the background.

If you upgraded the device to the next available build after enabling reserved storage, you can check the reserved storage size.

This tutorial will show you how to check the reserved storage size used for Windows Update in Windows 10.

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How to Enable or Disable Reserved Storage for Windows Update in Windows 10

Starting with the next major update Microsoft is making a few changes to how Windows 10 manages disk space. Through reserved storage, some disk space will be set aside to be used by updates, apps, temporary files, and system caches. Microsoft’s goal is to improve the day-to-day function of your PC by ensuring critical OS functions always have access to disk space. Without reserved storage, if a user almost fills up her or his storage, several Windows and application scenarios become unreliable. Windows and application scenarios may not work as expected if they need free space to function. With reserved storage, updates, apps, temporary files, and caches are less likely to take away from valuable free space and should continue to operate as expected. Reserved storage will be introduced automatically on devices that come with version 1903 pre-installed or those where 1903 was clean installed. You don’t need to set anything up—this process will automatically run in the background.

The Reserved Storage feature is available for testing to Windows Insiders running build 18298 or newer.

This tutorial will show you how to enable or disable the Reserved Storage feature for Windows Update in Windows 10.

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How to Turn On or Off Automatically Adjust Active Hours in Windows 10

Windows Update keeps Windows 10 updated by downloading and installing the latest updates, drivers, and hotfixes released by Microsoft.

Starting with Windows 10 build 14316, you can now set the time in which you are most active on your device by changing active hours. Active hours lets Windows know when you usually use this device. When a restart is necessary to finish installing an update, Windows won’t automatically restart your device during active hours.

When a restart is scheduled, you can use a custom restart time to temporarily override active hours and schedule a custom time to finish installing the current update(s). When your computer restarts on the scheduled custom time, custom restart time will automatically be turned off, and Windows Update will only restart outside of active hours again. You can also manually turn off custom restart time at anytime if you change your mind.

Starting with Windows 10 build 18282, Windows can automatically adjust active hours for you based on your device activity.

This tutorial will show you how to turn on or off letting Windows automatically adjust active hours for you based on your daily usage to avoid rebooting your Windows 10 PC to finish installing a Windows Update.

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How to Enable or Disable Pause Updates Feature of Windows Update in Windows 10

Windows Update keeps Windows 10 updated by downloading and installing the latest updates, drivers, and hotfixes released by Microsoft.

Starting with Windows 10 build 15002, you can temporarily pause updates from being installed for up to 7 days (Insiders) or 35 days (non Insiders). Some updates, like Windows Defender definition updates, will continue to be installed.

Starting with Windows 10 version 1809, you can use a new group policy to remove access to “Pause updates” feature.

This tutorial will show you how to enable or disable access to the Pause updates feature of Windows Update for all users in Windows 10.

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How to Change Deadline before Auto-restart for Update in Windows 10

Microsoft has made it easier for Windows Update to keep Windows 10 updated by automatically downloading and installing the latest features and improvements, drivers, and hotfixes released by Microsoft—and with fewer interruptions and restarts when you’re using your PC the most. The latest updates will automatically download and install when they’re available. (Unless you’re on a metered connection, then updates won’t download until you manually check for updates.)

After an update is installed, Windows 10 attempts automatic restart outside of active hours. If the restart does not succeed after the deadline of 7 days (by default), the user will see a warning notification that restart is required.

If you like, you can use the Specify deadline before auto-restart for update installation policy to specify the deadline in days before automatically executing a scheduled restart outside of active hours. The deadline can be set from the default 7 days to a number between 2 and 30 days from the time the restart is scheduled.

This tutorial will show you how to change the deadline in days before automatically executing a scheduled restart outside of active hours for a Windows Update in Windows 10.

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How to Configure Auto-restart Warning Notifications Schedule for Updates in Windows 10

Microsoft has made it easier for Windows Update to keep Windows 10 updated by automatically downloading and installing the latest features and improvements, drivers, and hotfixes released by Microsoft—and with fewer interruptions and restarts when you’re using your PC the most. The latest updates will automatically download and install when they’re available. (Unless you’re on a metered connection, then updates won’t download until you manually check for updates.)

After an update is installed, Windows 10 attempts automatic restart outside of active hours. If the restart does not succeed after the deadline of 7 days (by default), the user will see a notification that restart is required.

Since users are not able to postpone a scheduled restart once the deadline has been reached, you can configure a warning reminder (4 hours default) prior to the scheduled restart. You can also configure a warning (15 minutes default) prior to the restart, to notify users once the restart is imminent and allow them to save their work.

This tutorial will show you how to specify when notifications are displayed to warn users about a scheduled restart for a Windows Update installation deadline in Windows 10.

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How to Configure Auto-restart Reminder Notifications for Updates in Windows 10

Microsoft has made it easier for Windows Update to keep Windows 10 updated by automatically downloading and installing the latest features and improvements, drivers, and hotfixes released by Microsoft—and with fewer interruptions and restarts when you’re using your PC the most. The latest updates will automatically download and install when they’re available. (Unless you’re on a metered connection, then updates won’t download until you manually check for updates.)

When a restart is required to install updates, you can schedule a time to restart and finish installing updates.

By default, a auto-restart reminder notification will be shown 15 minutes prior to a scheduled restart.

If you like, you can set a policy to specify the amount of time you want prior to a scheduled restart to notify users.

This tutorial will show you how to specify the amount of time prior to a scheduled restart for Windows Update to show auto-restart reminder notifications in Windows 10.

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How to Configure Auto-restart Required Notification for Updates in Windows 10

Microsoft has made it easier for Windows Update to keep Windows 10 updated by automatically downloading and installing the latest features and improvements, drivers, and hotfixes released by Microsoft—and with fewer interruptions and restarts when you’re using your PC the most. The latest updates will automatically download and install when they’re available. (Unless you’re on a metered connection, then updates won’t download until you manually check for updates.)

When a restart is required to install updates, the auto-restart required notification is displayed. By default, the notification is automatically dismissed after 25 seconds. If you like, you can enable a policy to require user action to dismiss the notification. This will help make sure users see the notification to restart, and save their work first.

This tutorial will show you how to require user action to dismiss the auto-restart required notification for Windows Update in Windows 10.

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How to Specify Max Active Hours Range for Auto-restarts in Windows 10

Active hours identify the period of time when you expect the device to be in use. Automatic restarts after an update will occur outside of the active hours.

By default, active hours are from 8 AM to 5 PM. Users can change the active hours manually with a max active hours range of 18 hours by default.

Starting with Windows 10 version 1703, administrators can specify the max active hours range users can set. This option gives you additional flexibility to leave some of the decision for active hours on the user’s side, while making sure you allow enough time for updating. The specified range will be counted from the active hours start time.

This tutorial will show you how to specify the maximum number of hours from the start time that users can set their active hours for Windows Update auto-restarts in Windows 10.

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How to View Windows Upgrade History in Windows 10

Each time you upgrade Windows 10 (ex: Home to Pro edition) or have a build upgrade of Windows 10 (ex: new build via Windows Update), this upgrade history is stored in the registry.

It can be useful to view the Windows upgrade history to find out about previously installed builds and editions of Windows on your Windows 10 PC.

This tutorial will show you how to view the Windows upgrade history of your Windows 10 PC.

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How to Change Delivery Optimization Max Cache Size for Updates in Windows 10

Windows Update Delivery Optimization lets you get Windows and Store app updates from sources in addition to Microsoft. This can help you get updates and apps more quickly if you have a limited or unreliable Internet connection. And if you own more than one PC, it can reduce the amount of Internet bandwidth needed to keep all of your PCs up-to-date. Delivery Optimization also sends updates and apps from your PC to other PCs on your local network or PCs on the Internet.

When configuring Delivery Optimization on Windows 10 devices, the first and most important thing to configure is the Download mode, which dictates how Delivery Optimization downloads Windows updates.

You can choose to download updates only from Microsoft, Microsoft and PCs on your local network, or Microsoft and PCs on your local network and internet.

When Delivery Optimization is turned on, your PC sends parts of apps or updates that you’ve downloaded using Delivery Optimization to other PCs on your local network, or on the Internet, depending on your settings.

Delivery Optimization uses locally cached updates. In cases where devices have ample local storage and you would like to cache more content, or if you have limited storage and would like to cache less, use the following settings to adjust the Delivery Optimization cache to suit your scenario:

  • Max Cache Size and Absolute Max Cache Size control the amount of space the Delivery Optimization cache can use.
  • Max Cache Age controls the retention period for each update in the cache.
  • The system drive is the default location for the Delivery Optimization cache. The Modify Cache Drive policy allows administrators to change that location.

This tutorial will show you how to change the maximum size of the Delivery Optimization cache for Windows and Store app updates in Windows 10.

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How to Change Delivery Optimization Max Cache Age for Updates in Windows 10

Windows Update Delivery Optimization lets you get Windows and Store app updates from sources in addition to Microsoft. This can help you get updates and apps more quickly if you have a limited or unreliable Internet connection. And if you own more than one PC, it can reduce the amount of Internet bandwidth needed to keep all of your PCs up-to-date. Delivery Optimization also sends updates and apps from your PC to other PCs on your local network or PCs on the Internet.

When configuring Delivery Optimization on Windows 10 devices, the first and most important thing to configure is the Download mode, which dictates how Delivery Optimization downloads Windows updates.

You can choose to download updates only from Microsoft, Microsoft and PCs on your local network, or Microsoft and PCs on your local network and internet.

When Delivery Optimization is turned on, your PC sends parts of apps or updates that you’ve downloaded using Delivery Optimization to other PCs on your local network, or on the Internet, depending on your settings.

Delivery Optimization uses locally cached updates. In cases where devices have ample local storage and you would like to cache more content, or if you have limited storage and would like to cache less, use the following settings to adjust the Delivery Optimization cache to suit your scenario:

  • Max Cache Size and Absolute Max Cache Size control the amount of space the Delivery Optimization cache can use.
  • Max Cache Age controls the retention period for each update in the cache.
  • The system drive is the default location for the Delivery Optimization cache. The Modify Cache Drive policy allows administrators to change that location.

This tutorial will show you how to change the maximum cache age for Delivery Optimization to hold Windows and Store app updates in Windows 10.

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Change Delivery Optimization Cache Drive for Windows and Store App Updates in Windows 10

Windows Update Delivery Optimization lets you get Windows and Store app updates from sources in addition to Microsoft. This can help you get updates and apps more quickly if you have a limited or unreliable Internet connection. And if you own more than one PC, it can reduce the amount of Internet bandwidth needed to keep all of your PCs up-to-date. Delivery Optimization also sends updates and apps from your PC to other PCs on your local network or PCs on the Internet.

When configuring Delivery Optimization on Windows 10 devices, the first and most important thing to configure is the Download mode, which dictates how Delivery Optimization downloads Windows updates.

You can choose to download updates only from Microsoft, Microsoft and PCs on your local network, or Microsoft and PCs on your local network and internet.

When Delivery Optimization is turned on, your PC sends parts of apps or updates that you’ve downloaded using Delivery Optimization to other PCs on your local network, or on the Internet, depending on your settings.

Delivery Optimization uses locally cached updates. In cases where devices have ample local storage and you would like to cache more content, or if you have limited storage and would like to cache less, use the following settings to adjust the Delivery Optimization cache to suit your scenario:

  • Max Cache Size and Absolute Max Cache Size control the amount of space the Delivery Optimization cache can use.
  • Max Cache Age controls the retention period for each update in the cache.
  • The system drive is the default location for the Delivery Optimization cache. The Modify Cache Drive policy allows administrators to change that location.

This tutorial will show you how to change the cache location used by Delivery Optimization for Windows and Store app updates in Windows 10.

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How to Specify How Windows and Store App Updates are Downloaded in Windows 10

Windows Update Delivery Optimization lets you get Windows and Store app updates from sources in addition to Microsoft. This can help you get updates and apps more quickly if you have a limited or unreliable Internet connection. And if you own more than one PC, it can reduce the amount of Internet bandwidth needed to keep all of your PCs up-to-date. Delivery Optimization also sends updates and apps from your PC to other PCs on your local network or PCs on the Internet.

You can choose to download updates only from Microsoft, Microsoft and PCs on your local network, or Microsoft and PCs on your local network and internet.

Delivery Optimization works in two ways.

Download updates and apps from other PCs

In addition to downloading updates and apps from Microsoft, Windows will get updates and apps from other PCs that already have them. You can choose which PCs you get these updates from:

PCs on your local network. When Windows downloads an update or app, it will look for other PCs on your local network that have already downloaded the update or app using Delivery Optimization. Windows then downloads parts of the file from those PCs and parts of the file from Microsoft. Windows doesn’t download the entire file from one place. Instead, the download is broken down into smaller parts. Windows uses the fastest, most reliable download source for each part of the file.

PCs on your local network and PCs on the Internet. Windows uses the same process as when getting updates and apps from PCs on your local network, and also looks for PCs on the Internet that can be used as a source to download parts of updates and apps.

Send updates and apps to other PCs

When Delivery Optimization is turned on, your PC sends parts of apps or updates that you’ve downloaded using Delivery Optimization to other PCs on your local network, or on the Internet, depending on your settings.

If you like, you can set a policy to specify the download method that Delivery Optimization can use in downloads of Windows Updates and Microsoft Store App updates. When you specify a download mode, it prevents choosing a download method for Delivery Optimization in Settings.

This tutorial will show you how to specify a download mode for Delivery Optimization of Windows and Microsoft Store app updates in Windows 10.

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How to Turn On or Off Show More Windows Update Restart Notifications in Windows 10

Windows Update keeps Windows 10 updated by downloading and installing the latest updates, drivers, and hotfixes released by Microsoft.

Sometimes it may be required to restart your PC to finish installing an update.

You can set the time in which you are most active on your device by adjusting active hours. Active Hours lets Windows know when you usually use this device. When a restart is necessary to finish installing an update, Windows won’t automatically restart your device during active hours.

When a restart is scheduled, you can use a custom restart time to temporarily override active hours and schedule a custom time to finish installing the current update(s). When your PC restarts on the scheduled custom time, custom restart time will automatically be turned off, and Windows Update will only restart outside of active hours again. You can also manually turn off custom restart time at anytime if you change your mind.

Starting with Windows 10 build 15019, you can now enable to show more notifications about restarting you PC for updates to help keep you informed about scheduled restart times.

This tutorial will show you how to turn on or off showing more Windows Update restart notifications for your Windows 10 PC.

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How to Turn On or Off Pause Updates on Windows 10 Mobile Phone

Windows Update keeps your Windows 10 Mobile phone updated by downloading and installing the latest updates released by Microsoft.

Starting with Windows 10 Mobile build 15007, you can temporarily pause updates from being installed for up to 35 days. Some updates, like Windows Defender definition updates, will continue to be installed.

This tutorial will show you how to turn on or off to pause updates in Windows Update for up to 35 days on your Windows 10 Mobile phone.

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