DNS – Windows Blog by Brink

DNS

Display DNS Resolver Cache in Windows 11

A DNS (Domain Name System) resolver cache is a temporary database, maintained by Windows, that contains records of all your recent visits and attempted visits to websites and other Internet domains.

The Internet relies on the Domain Name System (DNS) to maintain an index of all public websites and their corresponding IP addresses. Every time a user visits a website by its name (such as “tenforums.com”), the user’s web browser initiates a request out to the Internet, but this request cannot be completed until the website name is converted into an IP address.

This conversion process is called name resolution and is the job of DNS, but it takes time. A DNS cache attempts to speed up the process by handling the name resolution before the request is sent out to the Internet.

If the IP address of a website changes before your DNS cache updates, you may not be able to load the webpage. If you are running into a lot of Page Not Found errors and you know you are connected to the Internet, you could try flushing your DNS cache to have your computer request new information.

The ipconfig /displaydns or Get-DnsClientCache command displays the contents of the DNS client resolver cache, which includes both entries preloaded from the local Hosts file and any recently obtained resource records for name queries resolved by the computer. The DNS Client service uses this information to resolve frequently queried names quickly, before querying its configured DNS servers.

Viewing the contents of the DNS Resolver Cache may help in troubleshooting to verify name resolution and IP.

This tutorial will show you how to view the contents of your DNS Resolver Cache in Windows 11 and Windows 10.

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Flush DNS Resolver Cache in Windows 11

A DNS (Domain Name System) resolver cache is a temporary database, maintained by Windows, that contains records of all your recent visits and attempted visits to websites and other Internet domains.

The Internet relies on the Domain Name System (DNS) to maintain an index of all public websites and their corresponding IP addresses. Every time a user visits a website by its name (such as “tenforums.com”), the user’s web browser initiates a request out to the Internet, but this request cannot be completed until the website name is converted into an IP address.

This conversion process is called name resolution and is the job of DNS, but it takes time. A DNS cache attempts to speed up the process by handling the name resolution before the request is sent out to the Internet.

If the IP address of a website changes before your DNS cache updates, you may not be able to load the webpage. If you are running into a lot of Page Not Found errors and you know you are connected to the Internet, you could try flushing your DNS cache to have your computer request new information.

This tutorial will show you how to flush your DNS resolver cache in Windows 11, Windows10, Microsoft Edge, and Google Chrome.

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Enable DNS over HTTPS (DoH) in Windows 11

A DNS (Domain Name System) server is the service that makes it possible for you to open a web browser, type a domain name and load your favorite websites.

DNS over HTTPS (DoH) is a protocol for performing remote Domain Name System resolution via the HTTPS protocol. A goal of the method is to increase user privacy and security by preventing eavesdropping and manipulation of DNS data by man-in-the-middle attacks by using the HTTPS protocol to encrypt the data between the DoH client and the DoH-based DNS resolver.

This tutorial will show you how to enable DNS over HTTPS (DoH) in Windows 11.

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How to Enable or Disable DNS over HTTPS (DoH) in Firefox

When you type a web address or domain name into your address bar (example: www.tenforums.com), your browser sends a request over the Internet to look up the IP address for that website.

Traditionally, this request is sent to servers over a plain text connection. This connection is not encrypted, making it easy for third-parties to see what website you’re about to access.

DNS-over-HTTPS (DoH) works differently. It sends the domain name you typed to a DoH-compatible DNS server using an encrypted HTTPS connection instead of a plain text one. This prevents third-parties from seeing what websites you are trying to access.

DNS over HTTPS (DoH) is a protocol for performing remote Domain Name System (DNS) resolution via the HTTPS protocol. A goal of the method is to increase user privacy and security by preventing eavesdropping and manipulation of DNS data by man-in-the-middle attacks by using the HTTPS protocol to encrypt the data between the DoH client and the DoH-based DNS resolver. Encryption by itself does not protect privacy, encryption is simply a method to obfuscate the data. As of March 2018, Google and the Mozilla Foundation started testing versions of DNS over HTTPS.

This tutorial will show you how to enable or disable DNS over HTTPS (DoH) in Firefox for your account in Windows 7, Windows 8, or Windows 10.

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How to Enable or Disable DNS over HTTPS (DoH) in Google Chrome

DNS over HTTPS (DoH) is a protocol for performing remote Domain Name System (DNS) resolution via the HTTPS protocol. A goal of the method is to increase user privacy and security by preventing eavesdropping and manipulation of DNS data by man-in-the-middle attacks by using the HTTPS protocol to encrypt the data between the DoH client and the DoH-based DNS resolver. Encryption by itself does not protect privacy, encryption is simply a method to obfuscate the data. As of March 2018, Google and the Mozilla Foundation started testing versions of DNS over HTTPS.

Starting with Google Chrome 78, you can enable DNS-over-HTTPS via a new Secure DNS lookups command line flag.

This tutorial will show you how to enable or disable DNS over HTTPS (DoH) in Google Chrome for your account in Windows 7, Windows 8, or Windows 10.

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