GPU – Windows Blog by Brink

GPU

Change Graphics Performance Preference for Apps in Windows 11

You can choose custom graphics performance settings you prefer for apps in Windows 11.

This allows you to specify which GPU you prefer to use by default for specific Microsoft Store and Desktop apps. Preferences may provide better app performance or save battery life. Choices may not take effect until the next time the app launches.

Generally, the power saving GPU is the integrated GPU on a system, and the high performance GPU is the discrete GPU or external GPU. If you have both a discrete GPU and an external GPU on a system, the external GPU is considered the high performance GPU.

Apps are always allowed to have the ultimate choice of which GPU to use, so you may see additional apps that do not follow the preferences you set. In that case, look for a setting within the app itself to choose a preference.

This tutorial will show you how to change the graphics performance preference for desktop and Microsoft Store apps for your account in Windows 11.

Read more…

Turn On or Off Hardware Accelerated GPU Scheduling in Windows 11

Hardware Accelerated GPU Scheduling enables more efficient GPU scheduling between applications by reducing latency and improving video output performance.

Hardware Accelerated GPU Scheduling requires a GPU that support hardware acceleration, combined with a graphics driver that supports WDDM 2.7 or higher.

This tutorial will show you how to turn on or off hardware-accelerated GPU scheduling in Windows 11.

Read more…

How to Reset GPU Preferences for Apps to Default in Windows 10

Starting with Windows 10 build 17093, Microsoft is introducing a new Graphics settings page for Multi-GPU systems that allows you to manage the graphics performance preference of your apps. You may be familiar with similar graphics control panels from AMD and Nvidia, and you can continue to use those control panels. When you set an application preference in the Windows Graphics settings, that will take precedence over the other control panel settings.

This new setting allows you to specify which GPU you prefer to use by default for specific Store (universal) and Desktop (classic) apps. Preferences may provide better app performance or save battery life. Choices may not take effect until the next time the app launches.

Generally, the power saving GPU is the integrated GPU on a system, and the high performance GPU is the discrete GPU or external GPU. If you have both a discrete GPU and an external GPU on a system, the external GPU is considered the high performance GPU.

Applications are always allowed to have the ultimate choice of which GPU to use, so you may see additional applications that do not follow the preferences you set. In that case, look for a setting within the application itself to choose a preference.

Starting with Windows 10 build 19564, Microsoft updated the Graphics settings page (Settings > System > Display > Graphics settings), allowing for better control over designating which GPU your apps run on. With this update, the app list and GPU preference are pre-populated on a best effort basis to improve the default preference management experience. If your desired app isn’t pre-populated, you can still add it by using the app selection drop-down. You’ll notice alongside this, Microsoft also added a search box and a filter for the list of apps.

Starting with Windows 10 build 20190, Microsoft has made the following improvements:

  • Updated the Graphics Settings to allow users to specify a default high performance GPU.
  • Updated the Graphics Settings to allow users to pick a specific GPU on a per application basis.

This tutorial will show you how to backup and restore the GPU graphics performance preference for apps settings for your account in Windows 10.

Read more…

How to Backup and Restore GPU Preferences for Apps in Windows 10

Starting with Windows 10 build 17093, Microsoft is introducing a new Graphics settings page for Multi-GPU systems that allows you to manage the graphics performance preference of your apps. You may be familiar with similar graphics control panels from AMD and Nvidia, and you can continue to use those control panels. When you set an application preference in the Windows Graphics settings, that will take precedence over the other control panel settings.

This new setting allows you to specify which GPU you prefer to use by default for specific Store (universal) and Desktop (classic) apps. Preferences may provide better app performance or save battery life. Choices may not take effect until the next time the app launches.

Generally, the power saving GPU is the integrated GPU on a system, and the high performance GPU is the discrete GPU or external GPU. If you have both a discrete GPU and an external GPU on a system, the external GPU is considered the high performance GPU.

Applications are always allowed to have the ultimate choice of which GPU to use, so you may see additional applications that do not follow the preferences you set. In that case, look for a setting within the application itself to choose a preference.

Starting with Windows 10 build 19564, Microsoft updated the Graphics settings page (Settings > System > Display > Graphics settings), allowing for better control over designating which GPU your apps run on. With this update, the app list and GPU preference are pre-populated on a best effort basis to improve the default preference management experience. If your desired app isn’t pre-populated, you can still add it by using the app selection drop-down. You’ll notice alongside this, Microsoft also added a search box and a filter for the list of apps.

Starting with Windows 10 build 20190, Microsoft has made the following improvements:

  • Updated the Graphics Settings to allow users to specify a default high performance GPU.
  • Updated the Graphics Settings to allow users to pick a specific GPU on a per application basis.

This tutorial will show you how to backup and restore the GPU graphics performance preference for apps settings for your account in Windows 10.

Read more…

How to Monitor GPU Temperature from Task Manager in Windows 10

Task Manager can be used to view and manage your processes, performance statistics, app history, users, processes details, and services in Windows 10.

Starting with Windows 10 build 18963, Microsoft added GPU temperature monitoring support in Task Manager. If you have a dedicated GPU card, you will now have the current temperature next to its listing in the Performance Tab.

This tutorial will show you how to monitor the current GPU temperature from Task Manager in Windows 10.

Read more…

How to Add or Remove NVIDIA GPU Activity Notification Area Icon on Taskbar in Windows

If your Windows device has NIVIDIA graphics and NVIDIA display drivers installed, you can display the NVIDIA GPU Activity icon in the taskbar notification area to better monitor the GPU activity.

This tutorial will show you how to add or remove the NVIDIA GPU Activity notification area icon on the taskbar for your account in Windows 7, Windows 8, and Windows 10.

Read more…

How to Check What Graphics Card or GPU is in Windows PC

A Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) is a single-chip processor primarily used to manage and boost the performance of video and graphics.

A graphics card (also called a display card, video card, display adapter, or graphics adapter) is an expansion card which generates a feed of output images to a display device (such as a computer monitor). Frequently, these are advertised as discrete or dedicated graphics cards, emphasizing the distinction between these and integrated graphics. At the core of both is the graphics processing unit (GPU), which is the main part that does the actual computations, but should not be confused as the video card as a whole, although “GPU” is often used to refer to video cards.

This tutorial will show you different ways to check what graphics card or GPU is in your Windows 7, Windows 8, and Windows 10 PC.

Read more…