performance – Windows Blog by Brink

performance

Add or Remove Performance button on Toolbar in Microsoft Edge

Performance mode has been renamed to Efficiency mode in Microsoft Edge.

What is efficiency mode?
Helps minimize power usage to extend battery life by reducing resource usage (CPU, memory). Benefits might vary depending on your device applications and individuals browser habits.

How it works

  • Puts background tabs to sleep after 5 minutes of inactivity, if sleeping tabs is on
  • May cause videos to be less smooth, animations to slow down when you’re not interacting with the browser

You can select to use the following for efficiency mode when turned on:

  • Always active – Active when your device is charging to minimize resource usage.
  • Active when unplugged – Active when your device is unplugged to extend your battery life.
  • Active when unplugged, low battery – Active when your device is unplugged and saving battery to extend your battery life.

If you like, you can add the Performance button on the toolbar in Microsoft Edge Canary to make it easier to change efficiency mode settings.

This tutorial will show you how to add or remove the Performance button on the toolbar in the Chromium based Microsoft Edge.

Read more…

How to Reset GPU Preferences for Apps to Default in Windows 10

Starting with Windows 10 build 17093, Microsoft is introducing a new Graphics settings page for Multi-GPU systems that allows you to manage the graphics performance preference of your apps. You may be familiar with similar graphics control panels from AMD and Nvidia, and you can continue to use those control panels. When you set an application preference in the Windows Graphics settings, that will take precedence over the other control panel settings.

This new setting allows you to specify which GPU you prefer to use by default for specific Store (universal) and Desktop (classic) apps. Preferences may provide better app performance or save battery life. Choices may not take effect until the next time the app launches.

Generally, the power saving GPU is the integrated GPU on a system, and the high performance GPU is the discrete GPU or external GPU. If you have both a discrete GPU and an external GPU on a system, the external GPU is considered the high performance GPU.

Applications are always allowed to have the ultimate choice of which GPU to use, so you may see additional applications that do not follow the preferences you set. In that case, look for a setting within the application itself to choose a preference.

Starting with Windows 10 build 19564, Microsoft updated the Graphics settings page (Settings > System > Display > Graphics settings), allowing for better control over designating which GPU your apps run on. With this update, the app list and GPU preference are pre-populated on a best effort basis to improve the default preference management experience. If your desired app isn’t pre-populated, you can still add it by using the app selection drop-down. You’ll notice alongside this, Microsoft also added a search box and a filter for the list of apps.

Starting with Windows 10 build 20190, Microsoft has made the following improvements:

  • Updated the Graphics Settings to allow users to specify a default high performance GPU.
  • Updated the Graphics Settings to allow users to pick a specific GPU on a per application basis.

This tutorial will show you how to backup and restore the GPU graphics performance preference for apps settings for your account in Windows 10.

Read more…

How to Backup and Restore GPU Preferences for Apps in Windows 10

Starting with Windows 10 build 17093, Microsoft is introducing a new Graphics settings page for Multi-GPU systems that allows you to manage the graphics performance preference of your apps. You may be familiar with similar graphics control panels from AMD and Nvidia, and you can continue to use those control panels. When you set an application preference in the Windows Graphics settings, that will take precedence over the other control panel settings.

This new setting allows you to specify which GPU you prefer to use by default for specific Store (universal) and Desktop (classic) apps. Preferences may provide better app performance or save battery life. Choices may not take effect until the next time the app launches.

Generally, the power saving GPU is the integrated GPU on a system, and the high performance GPU is the discrete GPU or external GPU. If you have both a discrete GPU and an external GPU on a system, the external GPU is considered the high performance GPU.

Applications are always allowed to have the ultimate choice of which GPU to use, so you may see additional applications that do not follow the preferences you set. In that case, look for a setting within the application itself to choose a preference.

Starting with Windows 10 build 19564, Microsoft updated the Graphics settings page (Settings > System > Display > Graphics settings), allowing for better control over designating which GPU your apps run on. With this update, the app list and GPU preference are pre-populated on a best effort basis to improve the default preference management experience. If your desired app isn’t pre-populated, you can still add it by using the app selection drop-down. You’ll notice alongside this, Microsoft also added a search box and a filter for the list of apps.

Starting with Windows 10 build 20190, Microsoft has made the following improvements:

  • Updated the Graphics Settings to allow users to specify a default high performance GPU.
  • Updated the Graphics Settings to allow users to pick a specific GPU on a per application basis.

This tutorial will show you how to backup and restore the GPU graphics performance preference for apps settings for your account in Windows 10.

Read more…