process – Windows Blog by Brink

process

Turn On or Off AutoEndTasks at Sign out, Restart, Shut down in Windows 11

The¬†HungAppTimeout¬†value is the default 5 seconds you wait on the¬†Signing out,¬†Restarting, or¬†Shutting down¬†screen when you¬†sign out,¬†restart, or¬†shut down¬†to see if any still open apps (tasks) will end (close) before considered “hung” or “not responding”.

When the HungAppTimeout expires with unresponsive app(s) found, the End Task dialog appears asking you to click/tap on Sign out anyway, Restart anyway, Shut down anyway to force close the app(s) and lose anything unsaved, or click/tap on Cancel to cancel the sign out, restart, or shut down and return to the desktop to properly save and close the app(s).

If you do not make a choice in the End Task dialog before the 1 minute timeout expires, Windows will automatically cancel the sign out, restart, or shut down by default, and return you to the desktop.

If you turn on AutoEndTasks, Windows will automatically force close any apps instead of waiting for your choice on the End Task dialog screen, and automatically Sign out anyway, Restart anyway, or Shut down anyway.

This tutorial will show you how to turn on or off AutoEndTasks for your account in Windows 11 and Windows 10.

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Add “Kill all not responding tasks” Context Menu in Windows 11

The¬†Kill all not responding tasks¬†desktop context menu item will allow users to to quickly kill any “not responding” task processes all at once.

When you use the¬†Kill all not responding tasks¬†context menu, you will see a¬†No tasks running with the specified criteria¬†message if there are currently no “not responding” tasks running. If there were any not responding tasks running, then they would be listed as being killed instead.

This tutorial will show you how to add or remove the Kill all not responding tasks desktop context menu for all users in Windows 11.

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Check if Process is Running as Administrator (elevated) in Windows 11

Windows runs desktops apps and application files (ex: .bat, .cmd, .exe, and .msc file types) in user mode by default without elevated administrator rights unless it prompts you with UAC to run elevated (highest privileges).

Windows has standard user and administrator types of user accounts.

Standard User¬†– Standard user accounts are good for everyday usage, and can be a local account or Microsoft account. Standard user accounts can use most apps and change system settings that do not affect other users. If any action that requires elevated rights is attempted while signed in as a standard user, Windows will display a¬†UAC¬†prompt for the password of an administrator for approval. If¬†UAC¬†is set to “Never notify”, then a standard user will automatically be denied the elevated action.

Administrator РAdministrator accounts have complete access to the PC and can make any desired changes. Administrators can be a local account or Microsoft account. If any action that requires elevated rights is attempted while signed in as an administrator, Windows will display a UAC prompt for the administrator to confirm (Yes or No) using full administrator rights.

When you use¬†Run as administrator¬†on a desktop app or application file, you are allowing it to run with full administrator access to everything on the computer. This means you are giving it special permissions to access restricted parts of the computer that would otherwise be off-limits. This could be a potential security risk if not a trusted app or application file, but sometimes “Run as administrator” is necessary for a trusted app or application file to run properly if it requires elevated rights for full access.

This tutorial will show you how to determine if an app or process is currently running as administrator (elevated) or not in Windows 11.

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See Which User a Process is Running As in Windows 11

Run as different user allows a user to run a .bat, .cmd, .exe, .msc, or .msi file as a different user. This allows running the .bat, .cmd, .exe, .msc, or .msi file with the same permissions and access rights as the different user instead of the user account they are currently signed in to.

Run as different user will only affect the current instance of the running .bat, .cmd, .exe, .msc, or .msi file. You can open multiple instances of the file with each instance running as a different user.

This tutorial will show you how to see which user a process is running as in Windows 11.

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How to Enable or Disable Eco Mode for App or Process in Windows 10

A process is an instance of a program that is being executed. Each process running in Windows is assigned a unique decimal number called the process ID, or PID.

Starting with¬†Windows 10 build 21364, the Task Manager has a new experimental feature in this build called ‚ÄúEco mode‚ÄĚ which provides users with an option to¬†throttle¬†process resources. It will also help identify apps that are already running in Eco mode. This feature is helpful when you notice an app consuming high resources and would like to limit its consumption so that the system gives priority to other apps which will lead to faster foreground responsiveness and better energy efficiency.

Eco mode will lower process priority and improve power efficiency but may cause instability for certain processes.

This tutorial will show you how to enable or disable Eco mode power throttling for a process in Windows 10.

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How to Enable or Disable Launch Folder Windows in a Separate Process in Windows

Each process running in Windows is assigned a unique decimal number called the process ID (PID) to identify an active process. This number is used to specify the process when for example attaching a debugger to it.

By default, all File Explorer windows, including the desktop shell, run in a single explorer.exe process. If one File Explorer window hangs or crashes, it will cause all File Explorer windows running in the same process to hang or crash until the process restarts.

You are able to use the Open in new process context menu to manually open folder windows (File Explorer) in a new process.

If you like, you can enable to launch folder windows in a separate process by default. This way each explorer.exe process will have its own process ID (PID) to improve stability of the explorer shell.

This tutorial will show you how to enable or disable to launch folder windows in a separate explorer process by default for your account in Windows 7, Windows 8, and Windows 10.

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