system restore – Windows Blog by Brink

system restore

Add Create Restore Point Context Menu in Windows 11

Turning on system protection for a drive allows System Restore to include the drive when restore points are created so you can undo undesired system changes by reverting to a previous point in time.

System Restore monitors system changes and saves the system state as a restore point. If a system problem develops as a result of a system change, the user can return the system to a previous state using the data from a restore point.

Restore points are created to let users select a previous system state. Each restore point contains the required information to restore the system to the selected state. Restore points are created before key changes are made to the system.

System Restore automatically manages the disk space that is allocated for restore points. It purges the oldest restore points to make room for new ones. System Restore allocates space based on the size of the hard disk and the version of Windows that the computer runs, as shown in the following table. You can adjust the maximum disk space per drive used for system protection.

Use System Restore to make restore points when you install a new app, driver, or Windows update, and when you create a restore point manually. System Restore does not restore user data or documents, so it will not cause users to lose their files, e-mail, browsing history, or favorites. Restoring will remove apps, drivers, and updates installed after the restore point was made. System Restore is also made available to users in the Windows Recovery Environment or safe mode, making it easier for them to restore their computers to a state before problems occurred.

This tutorial will show you how to add or remove a Create Restore Point context menu for all users in Windows 11.

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Change System Restore Point Creation Frequency in Windows 11

Turning on system protection for a drive allows System Restore to include the drive when restore points are created so you can undo undesired system changes by reverting to a previous point in time.

System Restore monitors system changes and saves the system state as a restore point. If a system problem develops as a result of a system change, the user can return the system to a previous state using the data from a restore point.

Restore points are created to let users select a previous system state. Each restore point contains the required information to restore the system to the selected state. Restore points are created before key changes are made to the system.

Use System Restore to make restore points when you install a new app, driver, or Windows update, and when you create a restore point manually. System Restore does not restore user data or documents, so it will not cause users to lose their files, e-mail, browsing history, or favorites. Restoring will remove apps, drivers, and updates installed after the restore point was made.

If an app, command, or schedule calls to create a restore point in Windows 11, system restore will only create the restore point if no other restore point has already been created within the past 24 hours (1440 minutes) by default. Users can always manually create a restore point at any time from within the System Restore user interface though.

You can change the system restore point creation frequency to how many minutes you want instead of the default 1440 minute for System Restore to skip creating a new restore point if any restore points were created within the previous set minutes. Setting 0 minutes for unlimited will have System Restore never skip creating a new restore point.

This tutorial will show you how to increase or decrease the system restore point creation frequency to what you want in Windows 10 and Windows 11.

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Use System Restore on Windows 11

Turning on system protection for a drive allows System Restore to include the drive when restore points are created so you can undo undesired system changes by reverting to a previous point in time.

System Restore monitors system changes and saves the system state as a restore point. If a system problem develops as a result of a system change, the user can return the system to a previous state using the data from a restore point.

Restore points are created to let users select a previous system state. Each restore point contains the required information to restore the system to the selected state. Restore points are created before key changes are made to the system.

System Restore automatically manages the disk space that is allocated for restore points. It purges the oldest restore points to make room for new ones. System Restore allocates space based on the size of the hard disk and the version of Windows that the computer runs, as shown in the following table. You can adjust the maximum disk space per drive used for system protection.

Use System restore to make restore points when you install a new app, driver, or Windows update, and when you create a restore point manually. System Restore does not restore user data or documents, so it will not cause users to lose their files, e-mail, browsing history, or favorites. Restoring will remove apps, drivers, and updates installed after the restore point was made. System Restore is also made available to users in the Windows Recovery Environment or safe mode, making it easier for them to restore their computers to a state before problems occurred.

This tutorial will show you how to use System Restore to go back to a restore point in Windows 11.

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Create System Restore Point in Windows 11

Turning on system protection for a drive allows System Restore to include the drive when restore points are created so you can undo undesired system changes by reverting to a previous point in time.

System Restore monitors system changes and saves the system state as a restore point. If a system problem develops as a result of a system change, the user can return the system to a previous state using the data from a restore point.

Restore points are created to let users select a previous system state. Each restore point contains the required information to restore the system to the selected state. Restore points are created before key changes are made to the system.

System Restore automatically manages the disk space that is allocated for restore points. It purges the oldest restore points to make room for new ones. System Restore allocates space based on the size of the hard disk and the version of Windows that the computer runs, as shown in the following table. You can adjust the maximum disk space per drive used for system protection.

System Restore does not restore user data or documents, so it will not cause users to lose their files, e-mail, browsing history, or favorites. System Restore is also made available to users in the Windows Recovery Environment or safe mode, making it easier for them to restore their computers to a state before problems occurred.

This tutorial will show you how to manually create a restore point in Windows 11.

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Turn On or Off System Protection for Drives in Windows 11

Turning on system protection for a drive allows System Restore to include the drive when restore points are created so you can undo undesired system changes by reverting to a previous point in time.

System Restore monitors system changes and saves the system state as a restore point. If a system problem develops as a result of a system change, the user can return the system to a previous state using the data from a restore point.

Restore points are created to let users select a previous system state. Each restore point contains the required information to restore the system to the selected state. Restore points are created before key changes are made to the system.

System Restore automatically manages the disk space that is allocated for restore points. It purges the oldest restore points to make room for new ones. System Restore allocates space based on the size of the hard disk and the version of Windows that the computer runs, as shown in the following table. You can adjust the maximum disk space per drive used for system protection.

System Restore does not restore user data or documents, so it will not cause users to lose their files, e-mail, browsing history, or favorites. System Restore is also made available to users in the Windows Recovery Environment or safe mode, making it easier for them to restore their computers to a state before problems occurred.

This tutorial will show you how to turn on or off system protection to create restore points and do a system restore for drives in Windows 11.

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How to Enable or Disable System Restore Configuration in Windows 7, Windows 8, and Windows 10

System protection is a feature that allows you to undo unwanted system changes by being able to do a System Restore. System Restore enables users, in the event of a problem, to restore their computers to a previous state (restore point) without losing personal data files.

System Restore is enabled and turned on for the Windows system drive by default in Windows.

System Restore configuration allows you to turn protection on and off for drives, manage disk space usage for restore points, and delete restore points.

If you like, you can disable System Restore configuration to gray out the Configure button in the System Protection tab in System Properties.

This tutorial will show you how to enable or disable System Restore configuration in Windows 7, Windows 8, and Windows 10.

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How to See List of All Available System Restore Points in Windows

System protection (if turned on) is a feature that allows you to perform a system restore that takes your PC back to an earlier point in time, called a system restore point. This can be handy if your PC isn’t working well and you recently installed an app, driver, or update.

Each restore point contains the necessary information needed to restore the system to the chosen state. Restore points are automatically generated when you install a new app, driver, or Windows update, and generated when you create a restore point manually. Restoring won’t affect your personal files in your %UserProfile% folder, but it will remove apps, drivers, and updates installed after the restore point was created.

This tutorial will show you how to see a list of all available system restore points in Windows 7, Windows 8, and Windows 10.

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