Wi-Fi – Windows Blog by Brink

Wi-Fi

Set, Edit, or Remove Data Limit for Network Connection in Windows 11

Windows can help you stay under your data plan limit and look for ways to reduce data usage. After you set a data limit, it’ll let you know when you’re getting near it.

This tutorial will show you how to set, edit, or remove a data usage limit for cellular, Wi-Fi, and Ethernet network connections for all users in Windows 11.

Read more…

Turn On or Off Metered Connection for Wi-Fi Network in Windows 11

Wi-Fi is a wireless local area network (WLAN) technology and standard that uses high-frequency radio waves to provide wireless Internet and network connections to your device.

A metered connection is an Internet connection that has a data limit associated with it. Cellular data connections are set as metered by default. Wi-Fi and Ethernet network connections can be set to metered but aren’t by default. Some apps might work differently on a metered connection to help reduce your data usage. Also, some updates for Windows won’t be installed automatically.

If you have a metered Internet connection with a data limit, you might have to pay extra or the connection speed reduces if you go over the data limit.

Turning on metered connection for your Wi-Fi network can help prevent you from going over the data limit from your Internet service provider.

This tutorial will show you how to set a Wi-Fi network as a metered connection or non-metered connection for all users in Windows 11.

Read more…

Turn On or Off Wi-Fi in Windows 11

Wi-Fi is a wireless local area network (WLAN) technology and standard that uses high-frequency radio waves to provide wireless Internet and network connections to your device.

Turning off Wi-Fi will disconnect your PC from all Wi-Fi networks, and turn off power to the Wi-Fi adapter.

Turning off Wi-Fi when not needed can save on electricity and improve security.

This tutorial will show you how to only turn on or off Wi-Fi communication for your Windows 11 PC.

Read more…

How to Turn On or Off AutoSwitch for Wireless Network Connection in Windows 10

When you connect to a new wireless network, Windows will create a profile for the wireless network. A wireless (Wi-Fi) network profile contains the SSID (network name), password key, and security information to be able to connect to a wireless network.

If you turned on to automatically connect to wireless networks, Windows will automatically connect to your wireless network profiles based on a priority order when the wireless network is in range.

The autoSwitch parameter controls the roaming behavior of an auto-connected wireless network when a more preferred wireless network is in range.

If autoSwitch is turned on, it allows Windows to continue looking for other auto-connected wireless networks while connected to the current wireless network. If a higher priority auto-connected wireless network than the currently connected wireless network comes in range, Windows will automatically connect to it instead.

This tutorial will show you how to turn on or off autoSwitch for wireless networks set to connect automatically when in range in Windows 7, Windows 8, and Windows 10.

Read more…

How to Change When to Use Cellular Instead of Wi-Fi Network in Windows 10

Some Windows 10 devices have a SIM card and/or eSIM in them that lets you connect to a cellular data network (aka: LTE or Broadband), so you can get online in more places by using a cellular signal.

If your Windows 10 device doesn’t have a SIM card or eSIM, you can still connect to a cellular network by plugging in an external cellular device (also called a cellular modem or mobile broadband device). However, these external cellular devices will often have their own settings instead of being able to use the built-in Settings > Network & Internet > Cellular settings in Windows 10.

Sometimes you might be connected to a slower Wi-Fi network, or you might be in an area where using cellular data would be faster than Wi-Fi. In cases like this, Windows can connect you to the best network based on your current location if you select When Wi-Fi is poor or Always. When cellular data is used, it will use data from your data plan and you may incur charges.

This tutorial will show you how to select to never, always, or when Wi-Fi is poor use a cellular network instead of a Wi-Fi network by default in Windows 10.

Read more…

How to Enable or Disable Network Connectivity while in Modern Standby in Windows 10

In Windows 10, there are two power models for PCs: S3 and Modern Standby (S0 Low Power Idle). The S3 power model is an older standard and is not capable of the instant on that consumers expect from modern devices. Modern Standby is capable of leveraging all the capabilities of a modern chipset and can be integrated across the breadth of tablets and PCs today. The first iteration of Modern Standby was Connected Standby, which first shipped in Windows 8 and Windows 8.1. Modern Standby expands upon the Windows 8.x Connected Standby concept, allowing more flexibility in component selection.

Windows 10 Modern Standby (Modern Standby) expands the Windows 8.1 Connected Standby power model. Connected Standby, and consequently Modern Standby, enable an instant on / instant off user experience, similar to smartphone power models. Just like the phone, the S0 low power idle model enables the system to stay up-to-date whenever a suitable network is available.

Although Modern Standby enables an instant on/off user experience like Connected Standby, Modern Standby is more inclusive than the Windows 8.1 Connected Standby power model. Modern Standby allows for market segments previously limited to the S3 power model to take advantage of the low power idle model. Example systems include systems based on rotational media and hybrid media (for example, SSD + HDD or SSHD) and/or a NIC that doesn’t support all of the prior requirements for Connected Standby.

Modern Standby systems can be connected or disconnected to Wi-Fi or a wireless local area network (WLAN) while in standby. This behavior is dictated by the hardware and/or by configuration.

Connected Modern Standby will allow you to stay connected to Wi-Fi while in standby to still receive and get notifications about email, VoIP calls, and such, but it will use more battery.

Disconnected Modern Standby will allow longer battery life, but you will no longer have the advantages of staying connected to Wi-Fi while in standby.

This tutorial will show you how to enable or disable Wi-Fi network connectivity while in Modern Standby in Windows 10.

Read more…

How to Check if Connected or Disconnected Modern Standby in Windows 10

In Windows 10, there are two power models for PCs: S3 and Modern Standby (S0 Low Power Idle). The S3 power model is an older standard and is not capable of the instant on that consumers expect from modern devices. Modern Standby is capable of leveraging all the capabilities of a modern chipset and can be integrated across the breadth of tablets and PCs today. The first iteration of Modern Standby was Connected Standby, which first shipped in Windows 8 and Windows 8.1. Modern Standby expands upon the Windows 8.x Connected Standby concept, allowing more flexibility in component selection.

Windows 10 Modern Standby (Modern Standby) expands the Windows 8.1 Connected Standby power model. Connected Standby, and consequently Modern Standby, enable an instant on / instant off user experience, similar to smartphone power models. Just like the phone, the S0 low power idle model enables the system to stay up-to-date whenever a suitable network is available.

Although Modern Standby enables an instant on/off user experience like Connected Standby, Modern Standby is more inclusive than the Windows 8.1 Connected Standby power model. Modern Standby allows for market segments previously limited to the S3 power model to take advantage of the low power idle model. Example systems include systems based on rotational media and hybrid media (for example, SSD + HDD or SSHD) and/or a NIC that doesn’t support all of the prior requirements for Connected Standby.

Modern Standby systems can be connected or disconnected to Wi-Fi or a wireless local area network (WLAN) while in standby. This behavior is dictated by the hardware and/or by configuration.

Connected Modern Standby will allow you to stay connected to Wi-Fi while in standby to still receive and get notifications about email, VoIP calls, and such, but it will use more battery.

Disconnected Modern Standby will allow longer battery life, but you will no longer have the advantages of staying connected to Wi-Fi while in standby.

This tutorial will show you how to check if Modern Standby is set to be connected or disconnected to Wi-Fi while in standby in Windows 10.

Read more…

How to Turn On or Off Sync over mobile data with Windows 10 PC from Your Phone Companion app on Android phone

You can connect your phone and computer to get texts, photos, and more on your PC. Link the Your Phone app on your PC with Your Phone Companion to get started.

With Your Phone Companion, you can easily sync your Android phone to your Windows 10 PC for instant access to everything you love on your phone, right on your PC. Text messages can be found with ease, and you can finally stop emailing yourself photos.

Starting with Windows 10 build 18908, you can now sync your photos, messages, and notifications over mobile data without having to connect your Android phone to the Wi-Fi network.

This tutorial will show you how to turn on or off sync over mobile data in the Your Phone Companion app on your Android phone with the Your Phone app on your Windows 10 PC.

Read more…