Wi-Fi – Windows Blog by Brink

Wi-Fi

Turn On or Off Random Hardware Addresses for Wi-Fi Networks in Windows 11

Wi-Fi is a wireless local area network (WLAN) technology and standard that uses high-frequency radio waves to provide wireless Internet and network connections to your Windows device.

When you’re not connected to Wi-Fi, your PC sends a signal to look for Wi-Fi networks in the area to help you get connected. The signal contains the unique physical hardware (MAC) address for your device. Some places, for example shopping malls, stores, or other public areas, might use this unique address to track your movement in that area. If your Wi-Fi hardware supports it, you can turn on¬†random hardware addresses¬†to make it harder for people to track you when your PC scans for networks and connects.

There’s two controls for using¬†random hardware addresses‚ÄĒone is for all Wi-Fi networks and the other is for the specific Wi-Fi network you choose. When you turn it on for all networks, random hardware addresses are used while your PC scans for networks and connects to any network. When it’s turned on for a specific network you choose, random hardware addresses are used the next time you¬†connect¬†to that network.

This tutorial will show you how to turn on or off use random hardware (MAC) addresses for Wi-Fi networks in Windows 11.

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Check Wi-Fi Network Signal Strength in Windows 11

Wi-Fi is a wireless local area network (WLAN) technology and standard that uses high-frequency radio waves to provide wireless Internet and network connections to your Windows device.

The speed, performance, and reliability of a Wi-Fi network connection depends greatly on its signal strength quality.

A weak Wi-Fi signal can lead to slower speeds, dropouts, and disconnection. The further away the device is from the router, the weaker the signal can get. If your walls are made of dense materials (ex: concrete or brick) it will weaken or block a Wi-Fi signal.

This tutorial will show you how to check the signal strength of your Wi-Fi network connection in Windows 11.

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Find Wi-Fi Network Security Key Password in Windows 11

Wi-Fi is a wireless local area network (WLAN) technology and standard that uses high-frequency radio waves to provide wireless Internet and network connections to your Windows device.

When you connect to a Wi-Fi network for the first time, Windows will automatically add a profile for the Wi-Fi network. The saved profile contains the SSID (network name), security key (password), and security type information used to connect to this specific Wi-Fi network.

If you forgot your Wi-Fi network password, you can find it on a Windows PC that has a profile for the Wi-Fi network on it, or is currently connected to the Wi-Fi network. After you find your password, you can use it on a PC or device to connect to your Wi-Fi network.

This tutorial will show you how to find and see the security key password of your Wi-Fi network connection in Windows 10 and Windows 11.

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Backup and Restore Wi-Fi Network Profiles in Windows 11

Wi-Fi is a wireless local area network (WLAN) technology and standard that uses high-frequency radio waves to provide wireless Internet and network connections to your Windows device.

When you connect to a Wi-Fi network for the first time, Windows will automatically add a profile for the Wi-Fi network. The saved profile contains the SSID (network name), security key (password), and security type information used to connect to this specific Wi-Fi network.

Restoring a backed up Wi-Fi network profiles can be much easier than having to manually add and connect to a Wi-Fi network again.

This tutorial will show you how to backup and restore a specific or all Wi-Fi network profiles on your Windows 10 and Windows 11 PC.

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Delete Wi-Fi Network Profile in Windows 11

Wi-Fi is a wireless local area network (WLAN) technology and standard that uses high-frequency radio waves to provide wireless Internet and network connections to your Windows device.

When you connect to a Wi-Fi network for the first time, Windows will automatically add a profile for the Wi-Fi network. The saved profile contains the SSID (network name), security key (password), and security type information used to connect to this specific Wi-Fi network.

This tutorial will show you how to delete a Wi-Fi network profile in Windows 11.

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Connect to Wi-Fi Network in Windows 11

Wi-Fi is a wireless local area network (WLAN) technology and standard that uses high-frequency radio waves to provide wireless Internet and network connections to your Windows device.

When you set up and connect to a Wi-Fi network for the first time, Windows will automatically add a profile for the Wi-Fi network. The profile contains the SSID (network name), security key (password), and security type information used to connect to this Wi-Fi network.

Windows will usually automatically connect to networks in this priority order:

  • Ethernet
  • Wi‚ÄĎFi (wireless)
  • Mobile broadband (cellular)

Windows will automatically connect to your Wi-Fi network profiles based on a priority order when the Wi-Fi network is in range, and an Ethernet connection is not available.

If you check Connect automatically while connecting to a Wi-Fi network, that Wi-Fi profile will be placed at the top of the priority order list. If you have multiple Wi-Fi network connection profiles, you can change the priority order so the network profile you prefer will be the first one to use instead when in range.

This tutorial will show you how to connect to a Wi-Fi network in Windows 11.

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Connect to Wireless Display with Miracast in Windows 11

Miracast is a wireless technology your PC, laptop, or tablet can use to project your screen to wireless TVs, projectors, and streaming media players that also support Miracast. You can use this to share what you’re doing on your PC, present a slide show, or even play your favorite game on a larger screen.

You will see a control banner at the top of your screen when you are connected to a wireless display. The banner keeps you informed of the state of your connection, allows you to quick disconnect or reconnect to the same sink and allows you to tune the connection based on what you are doing. This tuning is done via the settings gear, which optimizes the screen to screen latency based on one of the three scenarios:

  • Gaming¬†minimizes the screen to screen latency to make gaming over a wireless connection possible.
  • Watching videos¬†mode increases the screen to screen latency to ensure the video on the big screen plays back smoothly and without glitching.
  • Working¬†modes strikes a good balance between game mode and video mode where the screen to screen latency is responsive enough that typing feels natural, while ensuring videos don‚Äôt glitch too often.

By default, all connections start off in working mode.

This tutorial will show you how to wirelessly connect your Windows 11 PC to a TV, projector, another PC, or other kind of external display that supports Miracast.

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Set, Edit, or Remove Data Limit for Network Connection in Windows 11

Windows can help you stay under your data plan limit and look for ways to reduce data usage. After you set a¬†data limit, it’ll let you know when you’re getting near it.

This tutorial will show you how to set, edit, or remove a data usage limit for cellular, Wi-Fi, and Ethernet network connections for all users in Windows 11.

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Turn On or Off Metered Connection for Wi-Fi Network in Windows 11

Wi-Fi is a wireless local area network (WLAN) technology and standard that uses high-frequency radio waves to provide wireless Internet and network connections to your device.

A¬†metered connection¬†is an Internet connection that has a data limit associated with it. Cellular data connections are set as metered by default. Wi-Fi and Ethernet network connections can be set to metered but aren’t by default. Some apps might work differently on a metered connection to help reduce your data usage. Also, some updates for Windows won’t be installed automatically.

If you have a metered Internet connection with a data limit, you might have to pay extra or the connection speed reduces if you go over the data limit.

Turning on metered connection for your Wi-Fi network can help prevent you from going over the data limit from your Internet service provider.

This tutorial will show you how to set a Wi-Fi network as a metered connection or non-metered connection for all users in Windows 11.

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Turn On or Off Wi-Fi in Windows 11

Wi-Fi is a wireless local area network (WLAN) technology and standard that uses high-frequency radio waves to provide wireless Internet and network connections to your device.

Turning off Wi-Fi will disconnect your PC from all Wi-Fi networks, and turn off power to the Wi-Fi adapter.

Turning off Wi-Fi when not needed can save on electricity and improve security.

This tutorial will show you how to only turn on or off Wi-Fi communication for your Windows 11 PC.

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How to Turn On or Off AutoSwitch for Wireless Network Connection in Windows 10

When you connect to a new wireless network, Windows will create a profile for the wireless network. A wireless (Wi-Fi) network profile contains the SSID (network name), password key, and security information to be able to connect to a wireless network.

If you turned on to automatically connect to wireless networks, Windows will automatically connect to your wireless network profiles based on a priority order when the wireless network is in range.

The autoSwitch parameter controls the roaming behavior of an auto-connected wireless network when a more preferred wireless network is in range.

If autoSwitch is turned on, it allows Windows to continue looking for other auto-connected wireless networks while connected to the current wireless network. If a higher priority auto-connected wireless network than the currently connected wireless network comes in range, Windows will automatically connect to it instead.

This tutorial will show you how to turn on or off autoSwitch for wireless networks set to connect automatically when in range in Windows 7, Windows 8, and Windows 10.

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How to Change When to Use Cellular Instead of Wi-Fi Network in Windows 10

Some Windows 10 devices have a SIM card and/or eSIM in them that lets you connect to a cellular data network (aka: LTE or Broadband), so you can get online in more places by using a cellular signal.

If your Windows 10 device doesn’t have a SIM card or eSIM, you can still connect to a cellular network by plugging in an external cellular device (also called a cellular modem or mobile broadband device). However, these external cellular devices will often have their own settings instead of being able to use the built-in Settings > Network & Internet > Cellular settings in Windows 10.

Sometimes you might be connected to a slower Wi-Fi network, or you might be in an area where using cellular data would be faster than Wi-Fi. In cases like this, Windows can connect you to the best network based on your current location if you select When Wi-Fi is poor or Always. When cellular data is used, it will use data from your data plan and you may incur charges.

This tutorial will show you how to select to never, always, or when Wi-Fi is poor use a cellular network instead of a Wi-Fi network by default in Windows 10.

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How to Enable or Disable Network Connectivity while in Modern Standby in Windows 10

In Windows 10, there are two power models for PCs: S3 and Modern Standby (S0 Low Power Idle). The S3 power model is an older standard and is not capable of the instant on that consumers expect from modern devices. Modern Standby is capable of leveraging all the capabilities of a modern chipset and can be integrated across the breadth of tablets and PCs today. The first iteration of Modern Standby was Connected Standby, which first shipped in Windows 8 and Windows 8.1. Modern Standby expands upon the Windows 8.x Connected Standby concept, allowing more flexibility in component selection.

Windows 10 Modern Standby (Modern Standby) expands the Windows 8.1 Connected Standby power model. Connected Standby, and consequently Modern Standby, enable an instant on / instant off user experience, similar to smartphone power models. Just like the phone, the S0 low power idle model enables the system to stay up-to-date whenever a suitable network is available.

Although Modern Standby enables an instant on/off user experience like Connected Standby, Modern Standby is more inclusive than the Windows 8.1 Connected Standby power model. Modern Standby allows for market segments previously limited to the S3 power model to take advantage of the low power idle model. Example systems include systems based on rotational media and hybrid media (for example, SSD + HDD or SSHD) and/or a NIC that doesn’t support all of the prior requirements for Connected Standby.

Modern Standby systems can be connected or disconnected to Wi-Fi or a wireless local area network (WLAN) while in standby. This behavior is dictated by the hardware and/or by configuration.

Connected Modern Standby will allow you to stay connected to Wi-Fi while in standby to still receive and get notifications about email, VoIP calls, and such, but it will use more battery.

Disconnected Modern Standby will allow longer battery life, but you will no longer have the advantages of staying connected to Wi-Fi while in standby.

This tutorial will show you how to enable or disable Wi-Fi network connectivity while in Modern Standby in Windows 10.

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How to Check if Connected or Disconnected Modern Standby in Windows 10

In Windows 10, there are two power models for PCs: S3 and Modern Standby (S0 Low Power Idle). The S3 power model is an older standard and is not capable of the instant on that consumers expect from modern devices. Modern Standby is capable of leveraging all the capabilities of a modern chipset and can be integrated across the breadth of tablets and PCs today. The first iteration of Modern Standby was Connected Standby, which first shipped in Windows 8 and Windows 8.1. Modern Standby expands upon the Windows 8.x Connected Standby concept, allowing more flexibility in component selection.

Windows 10 Modern Standby (Modern Standby) expands the Windows 8.1 Connected Standby power model. Connected Standby, and consequently Modern Standby, enable an instant on / instant off user experience, similar to smartphone power models. Just like the phone, the S0 low power idle model enables the system to stay up-to-date whenever a suitable network is available.

Although Modern Standby enables an instant on/off user experience like Connected Standby, Modern Standby is more inclusive than the Windows 8.1 Connected Standby power model. Modern Standby allows for market segments previously limited to the S3 power model to take advantage of the low power idle model. Example systems include systems based on rotational media and hybrid media (for example, SSD + HDD or SSHD) and/or a NIC that doesn’t support all of the prior requirements for Connected Standby.

Modern Standby systems can be connected or disconnected to Wi-Fi or a wireless local area network (WLAN) while in standby. This behavior is dictated by the hardware and/or by configuration.

Connected Modern Standby will allow you to stay connected to Wi-Fi while in standby to still receive and get notifications about email, VoIP calls, and such, but it will use more battery.

Disconnected Modern Standby will allow longer battery life, but you will no longer have the advantages of staying connected to Wi-Fi while in standby.

This tutorial will show you how to check if Modern Standby is set to be connected or disconnected to Wi-Fi while in standby in Windows 10.

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How to Turn On or Off Sync over mobile data with Windows 10 PC from Your Phone Companion app on Android phone

You can connect your phone and computer to get texts, photos, and more on your PC. Link the Your Phone app on your PC with Your Phone Companion to get started.

With Your Phone Companion, you can easily sync your Android phone to your Windows 10 PC for instant access to everything you love on your phone, right on your PC. Text messages can be found with ease, and you can finally stop emailing yourself photos.

Starting with Windows 10 build 18908, you can now sync your photos, messages, and notifications over mobile data without having to connect your Android phone to the Wi-Fi network.

This tutorial will show you how to turn on or off sync over mobile data in the Your Phone Companion app on your Android phone with the Your Phone app on your Windows 10 PC.

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