Scan Documents into CRM

I came across a company at the Convergence conference that has a great solution for CRM users that deal with a lot of documents. They have a device that connects to the network.and allows users to scan documents into CRM. The company name is Intellagent Solutions www.intellagentsolutions.com. If your processes involve a lot of documents you need to check this solution out.


 

More on CRM 3.0 Installations ON SBS 2003

I’ve been having problems with my CRM 3.0 SBE install on a SBS 2003 Premium install. Based on a lot of different posts in many different newgroups as well as some input form the Microsoft CRM team, I decided to try several installs under better controlled and documented conditions to see if I could understand what was happening. Here is a summary of my experiments



Assumptions: CRM 3.0 SBE is advertised to only work with SBS 2003 Premium and only with SBS SP1 installed. To me this means one of two variations: SBS 2003 with SQL 2000 SP4 and no ISA or SBS SP1 with SQL 2000 SP4 and ISA 2004. I also made a gross assumption that a system patched to SBS 2003 SP1 will act that same as a system installed as SP1 (I know this is probably faulted but I just don’t have time to build out that many different servers.)



As a starting point for both tests I built out an SBS 2003 virtual server image as follows and then enabled UNDO disks so I could go back to this point for the start of each test.




  1. Build out a virtual server image of SBS 2003 SP1 with SQL 2000 SP4 (using MSDN download ISO images) with the following characteristics:


    1. 2GB RAM, Single 16GB Hard Drive, Dual NIC

    2. Internal IP Address: 192.168.24.2

    3. External IP Address: 192.168.16.205 (connected to the Internet through my internal network)

    4. Domain: demo.local

    5. Machine Name: SBS

    6. External domain name: sbs.crm-demo.com (used for OWA and RWW access) Note that there is no host record for this domain name.

  2. Run the connection wizard to establish connection to the Internet.

  3. Install Virtual Machine Additions.

  4. No additional patching, hot fixes, or updates applied.

  5. Save image and then enable UNDO disks for remaining changes.


Test 1: Install CRM 3.0 SBS on SBS 2003 SP1 with SQL 2000 SP4 (No ISA)




  1. Restart virtual server image from rolled back state.

  2. Load CRM 3.0 SBE form MSDN ISO Images using all default settings.

  3. ERROR: SQL Reporting Services cannot find IP address corresponding to domain name sbs.crm-demo.com. I would have expected SQL Reporting Services to use the machine name of sbs.demo.local rather than the name assigned to the default web site certificate (sbs.crm-demo.com). In my case there is no way that the sbs.crm-demo.com domain name would resolve because there is no host record matching this value. However even if it did resolve it would not work because it would resolve to a public IP address and it would likely be blocked.


    1. WORK AROUND: Create a forward lookup zone in the SBS DNS Server for crm-demo.com and then create a host record pointing sbs.crm-demo.com to the IP address assigned to the internal NIC (192.168.24.2). Run a  IPCONFIG /flushdns and then retry the failed step.

    2. Note that additional actions will be required after setup completes to remove dependency on this DNS entry.

  4. ERROR: SQL Reporting Services cannot access the Report Server at sbs.crm-demo.com/ ReportServer due to a 401 access denied error.


    1. According to KB 896861 this is an issue resulting for Windows 2003 SP1. The KB offers two options to workaround the error. I chose to add the DisableLoopbackCheck DWORD value to the registry.

  5. Completed install without additional errors.

  6. Rebooted after installation completed

  7. Ran through CRM setup wizard.

  8. At this point any time I tried to run a report I was getting challenged for credentials from the report server at sbs.crm-demo.com. If I supplied credentials the report would continue.

  9. In order to remove the reference to sbs.crm-demo.com I edited the registry value for SQLRSServerURL at HKLM\Software\Microsoft\MSCRM from https://sbs.crm-demo.com/ReportServer to https://sbs.demo.local/ReportServer and performed an IISRESET at the command line.

  10. Removed the forward lookup zone for crm-demo.com from the SBS DNS server and flushed the DNS cache.

  11. Able to access CRM reports with out additional authentication. All seems to work well


Test 2: Install CRM 3.0 SBS on SBS 2003 SP1 with SQL 2000 SP4 with ISA 2004




  1. Restart virtual server image from rolled back state.

  2. Install ISA 2004 from the SBS Premium Technologies with SP1 using the MSDN ISO image. 

  3. Modified the default web site setup as follows per recommendation from Barry Givens (CRM PM)


    1. Set the port 80 and port 443 IP addresses to use all IP addresses rather than the distinct 192.168.24.2 and the 127.0.0.1.

  4. Set the DisableLoopbackCheck DWORD value per KB 896861 based on experience in first test.

  5. Ran CRM 3.0 SBE install using MSDN ISO images

  6. ERROR: Had an error during the SRS install but error cleared on RETRY.

  7. Install finished with out further error.

  8. Had a service start error on server startup. Microsoft Firewall Service did not start properly. The service did start from a manual start command.

  9. Ran through initial setup wizard

  10. Tested reports without issue.

  11. Ran the SBS Internet connection wizard and verified that the default web site IP address properties were returned to their pre-crm values.

  12. Opened CRM and tested reports. Flawless


It appears that the recommended fixes for installation when ISA 2004 is on the SBS 2003 box work. The issue I had in Test 1 Step 3 is perplexing. Oddly enough when I looked at the HKLM\Software\Microsoft\MSCRM\SQLRSServerURL value from Test 2 (ISA Installed) it was https://publishing.demo.local/ReportServer ( a local domain path) rather then the external domain name that I saw in my install without ISA 2004.

SBS SP1 Installation Woes

We implemented SBS SP1 this week and ran into a few issues with CRM after the install. Our installation has Microsoft CRM installed on the SBS server. We also had a few other modifications that made our system different than a baseline SBS 2K3 Premium install. I believe that the difference that caused our problems was that we had multiple IP addresses on our internal NIC. This modification was primarily in place to support SSL publishing of our CRM and Companyweb out to the Internet.


After the SBS SP1 install we had problems with our Microsoft Exchange Connector. We could not send email out from CRM nor could any inbound email come into CRM. We also had problems with some (but not all) of our C360 add on components for MS CRM. We were also seeing event ids 5895 and 5892 for the CRMExchangeQueueService.


We were not able to find a KB that was a dead fit but we pieced together a solution based on several KB’s that referred to incorrect or missing application extension mapping for two key virtual directories under the MS CRM web site.


The MSCRMServices and MSCRMConnector virtual directories contain web services that are used by code that uses the CRM SDK and by the CRM Exchange Queue Service respectively. These virtual directories need to have application extension mapping setup to process web service calls with a .srf extension. You can verify that mappings are installed correctly on each folder by running a simple test from IE.


1.       On the Microsoft CRM server, click Internet Explorer, click Tools, click Options, and then click the Advanced tab.


2.       Clear the Show friendly HTTP error messages check box, and then click OK.


3.       Open the Microsoft CRM Web site by using the following URL, where MSCRM is the name of the Microsoft CRM server to verify the .srf mappings on the two virtual directories:


          http://MSCRM/mscrmservices/bizusersdl.srf


          http://MSCRM/mscrmconnector/icrmemaildispatchsdl.srf


4.       Going to this address should generate either of the following results:


·          An XML message. If you see any XML data, the SOAP configuration is good.


·          An IIS specific error that occurs without XML data. If you see an IIS error, there may be problems with the configuration on the Microsoft CRM server. Proceed to step 5.


5.       Open Internet Information Manager. To do this, click Start, point to Administrative Tools, and then click Internet Information Services (IIS) Manager.


6.       Expand the Microsoft CRM Web site, and then locate the MSCRMServices virtual directory. Right-click MSCRMServices, and then click Properties.


7.       On the Directory tab, click Configuration. The .srf mapping should be listed in the Application extensions section on the Mappings tab.


8.       If the .srf mapping is missing, follow these steps:


a.       On the Application Configuration window, click Add.


b.       Click Browse to locate the Crmisapi.dll file. By default, the Crmisapi.dll file is installed at the following location: <install drive>:\Program Files\Microsoft CRM\Server\bin\Crmisapi.dll. If the path contains spaces, you must manually enclose the path with double quotation marks.


c. In the Extension text box, type .srf.


 


9. Repeat steps 6 through 9 for the MSCRMConnector virtual directory.


 

The blogger awakens….

Susan Bradley set up this blog for me last October when I received my first MVP award. I’ve had several false starts trying to figure out what value I could provide to the community through this blog. Admittedly I also got side tracked on layout, style, trying to figure out which skin to use, etc. Eventually the blog just became stagnant and we all know how hard it is to regain momentum.


I’m finishing up the last day of the 2005 Microsoft World Wide Partner conference in Minneapolis today. I’ve been doing some show-and-tell here at WWPC and I have received a lot of feedback along the lines of “I didn’t know you could do that with CRM!”. I’ve found my inspiration, something that touches my evangelism for the Microsoft CRM product. I’ve decided to use this blog to primarily educate any and all who are interested on interesting solutions, products, extensions, and development concepts associated with Microsoft CRM.


It will take me a while to get things going but I hope you will find it useful.


Scott Colson, CRM-MVP

Installing MSCRM 1.2 on SBS 2003

As some of you may know, I was working with Harry Brelsford to add some Microsoft CRM content to the “Extending SBS 2003” book. My hope was that I could help my peers in the SMB consulting space avoid some of the pot holes and dead ends that I encountered with MSCRM on SBS. The planned timing of the book release relative to Microsoft’s (now) official announcement of the release of Microsoft CRM 3.0 pretty much made the chapter I penned on installing MSCRM on SBS 2003 obsolete so I’ve decided (with Harry’s concurrence) to release the chapter to the public domain in hopes that it will help. This was my first crack on writing a chapter for a technical book. I’d appreciate any feedback that might help me as I start working on the new chapters for the “Extending SBS 2003” that will focus on CRM 3.0.


Check back here shortly for a link to my recipe for a successful CRM implementation on top of SBS 2003 …..

How To: Installing MSCRM on Windows Small Business Server 2003

As some of you may know, I was working with Harry Brelsford to add some Microsoft CRM content to the “Extending SBS 2003” book. My hope was that I could help my peers in the SMB consulting space avoid some of the pot holes and dead ends that I encountered with MSCRM on SBS. The planned timing of the book release relative to Microsoft’s (now) official announcement of the release of Microsoft CRM 3.0 pretty much made the chapter I penned on installing MSCRM on SBS 2003 obsolete so I’ve decided (with Harry’s concurrence) to release the chapter to the public domain in hopes that it will help. I hope to have some good constructive documentation available in the “Extending SBS 2003” focused on CRM 3.0.


Check back here shortly for a link to my recipe for a successful CRM implementation on top of SBS 2003 …..

Prescribed MSCRM Pacthes and Hot Fixes (From my CRM Knowledge Base)

























I install the following patches and hot fixes on all the Microsoft CRM implementations we manage. This article also demostrates the functionality of the CRM Knowlege Base and is infact a copy of the KB I maintain for my company. As I update my internal KB I’ll post the update here.


Prescribed Patches for a Microsoft CRM Server Installation

KBA-02024
Purpose & Scope
The following Updates and HotFixes should be applied to all Microsoft CRM V1.2 installations.
Prerequisites & Initial Conditions

Microsoft CRM v1.2 is installed.

Procedure

Install the following Updates and Hotfixes in the order listed.



  • (2005-03-28) KB870635 – Microsoft Business Solutions CRM update for Windows XP Service Pack 2
  • (2005-03-28) KB837059 – Update to Microsoft Business Solutions CRM 1.2 to add Coordinated Universal Time +1200 to timezone list
  • (2005-03-28) KB840934 – Microsoft Business Solutions CRM version 1.2 update for 839153, 839159, and 839162
  • (2005-03-28) KB841562 – Microsoft Business Solutions CRM 1.2 hotfix for 839163 and 835306
  • (2005-03-28) KB886355 – Microsoft CRM 1.2 Hotfix Rollup for 840058, 841648, 843172, 870575, 888004, 888005, and 888006
  • (2005-04-19) KB892949 – Microsoft CRM Update Rollup 1 for Microsoft CRM Sales for Outlook 1.2 (Note this role up addresses a lot of server side bugs too.)
Additional Comments
Last updated 4/22/2005