Pluralsight Course: Building Context-Menu Shell Extensions in C++

I “wrote” a couple of video courses published on Pluralsight (a third one is work in progress, stay tuned!).

My first Pluralsight course was “Building Context-Menu Shell Extensions in C++”. It’s a slightly less than three-hour course, in which I teach you how to build context-menu shell extensions in C++, using Visual Studio.

The course starts with a brief introduction to COM: just to those COM concepts required for the remaining course modules.

Then, in the following module, I introduce the use of IExecuteCommand to build a simple context-menu shell extension. In this module, I use just “raw” C++, without any frameworks (like ATL). This approach gives the opportunity to show how some things work “under the hood”.

In the next module, I revisit the IExecuteCommand technique, but this time with the help of ATL. ATL is a very useful productive framework for C++/COM programmers: comparing the work done in the previous module with the ATL-based approach presented in this module will make you appreciate the productivity improvements brought by ATL (and Visual Studio ATL Wizards).

In the final module I introduce you to an IContextMenu-based technique for building context-menu shell extensions. There are pros and cons in using IExecuteCommand vs. IContextMenu. For example, while IContextMenu is available in Windows XP, IExecuteCommand is a Win7+ COM interface. So, if you need to develop a context-menu shell extension that supports XP, you have to use IContextMenu.

Moreover, while IExecuteCommand simplifies some common operations, more advanced techniques like building fancy UIs in the context-menu (for example, implementing owner-drawn menu items) require the use of IContextMenu and its later incarnations (like IContextMenu3).

I hope you enjoy the course.

 

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