Printing UTF-8 Text to the Windows Console

Let’s suppose you have a string encoded in UTF-8, and you want to print it to the Windows console.

You might have heard of the _setmode function and the _O_U8TEXT flag.

The MSDN documentation contains this compilable code snippet that you can use as the starting point for your experimentation:

// crt_setmodeunicode.c  
// This program uses _setmode to change  
// stdout to Unicode. Cyrillic and Ideographic  
// characters will appear on the console (if  
// your console font supports those character sets).  
  
#include <fcntl.h>  
#include <io.h>  
#include <stdio.h>  
  
int main(void) {  
    _setmode(_fileno(stdout), _O_U16TEXT);  
    wprintf(L"\x043a\x043e\x0448\x043a\x0430 \x65e5\x672c\x56fd\n");  
    return 0;  
}  

So, to print UTF-8-encoded text, you may think of substituting the _O_U16TEXT flag with _O_U8TEXT, and use printf (or cout) with a byte sequence representing your UTF-8-encoded string.

For example, let’s consider the Japanese name for Japan, written using the kanji 日本.

The first kanji is the Unicode code point U+65E5; the second kanji is U+672C. Their UTF-8 encodings are the 3-byte sequences 0xE6 0x97 0xA5 and 0xE6 0x9C 0xAC, respectively.

So, let’s consider this compilable code snippet that tries to print a UTF-8-encoded string:

#include <fcntl.h>
#include <io.h>
#include <stdint.h>
#include <iostream>

int main()
{
    _setmode(_fileno(stdout), _O_U8TEXT);

    // Japanese name for Japan, 
    // encoded in UTF-8
    uint8_t utf8[] = { 
        0xE6, 0x97, 0xA5, // U+65E5
        0xE6, 0x9C, 0xAC, // U+672C
        0x00 
    };

    std::cout << reinterpret_cast<const char*>(utf8) << '\n';
}

This code compiles fine. However, if you run it, you’ll get this error message:

Error when trying to print UTF-8 text to the console
Error when trying to print UTF-8 text to the console

So, how to print some UTF-8 encoded text to the Windows command prompt?

Well, it seems that you have to first convert from UTF-8 to UTF-16, and then use wprintf or wcout to print the UTF-16-encoded text. This isn’t optimal, but at least it seems to work.

EDIT 2019-04-09: See this new blog post for a solution with compilable demo code.

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *