Building In-Process Shell Extensions? C++ Is The Right Tool For The Job

In today’s world, there are so many programming languages to choose from when  developing software projects. So, oftentimes, this question arises: “With so many simpler and higher-level programming languages, why should I choose C++ to do X?”

Well, programming languages (and frameworks) are just tools. And my usual guidance is: use the right tool for the job. So, if for your project a simpler/more productive/higher-level programming language is well suited, then just go for it!

But, there are cases in which C++ is just The Best Tool For The Job.

C++ great for perf
C++ great for perf

One of these contexts is the development of in-process shell extensions for Windows. There is a whole MSDN web page discussing “Guidance for Implementing In-Process Extensions”.

A key point is that the .NET Framework/CLR is a high-impact runtime, with associated performance issues for in-proc extensions:

“Performance issues can arise with runtimes that impose a significant performance penalty when they are loaded into a process. The performance penalty can be in the form of memory usage, CPU usage, elapsed time, or even address space consumption. The CLR, JavaScript/ECMAScript, and Java are known to be high-impact runtimes. Since in-process extensions can be loaded into many processes, and are often done so at performance-sensitive moments (such as when preparing a menu to be displayed the user), high-impact runtimes can negatively impact overall responsiveness. […]”

The aforementioned MSDN documentation continues with a brief discussion of issues associated to high resource consumption as well.

Then, another paragraph about “Issues Specific to the .NET Framework” briefly touches on COM interop related problems. It’s important to keep in mind that the in-proc shell extension model was designed around native code, and there is a kind of “impedance mismatch” between that and the managed .NET world.

Note that the use of .NET is considered acceptable for other types of extensions, like out-of-process extensions.

A common type of shell extensions are the context-menu extensions.

Example of customized context-menu via shell extensions
Example of customized context-menu via shell extensions

If you are curious about the development  of this type of extensions using C++, you may find my Pluralsight course on the subject interesting.

(A brief description of the course content is offered in this blog post.)

 

Pluralsight Course: Building Context-Menu Shell Extensions in C++

I “wrote” a couple of video courses published on Pluralsight (a third one is work in progress, stay tuned!).

My first Pluralsight course was “Building Context-Menu Shell Extensions in C++”. It’s a slightly less than three-hour course, in which I teach you how to build context-menu shell extensions in C++, using Visual Studio.

The course starts with a brief introduction to COM: just to those COM concepts required for the remaining course modules.

Then, in the following module, I introduce the use of IExecuteCommand to build a simple context-menu shell extension. In this module, I use just “raw” C++, without any frameworks (like ATL). This approach gives the opportunity to show how some things work “under the hood”.

In the next module, I revisit the IExecuteCommand technique, but this time with the help of ATL. ATL is a very useful productive framework for C++/COM programmers: comparing the work done in the previous module with the ATL-based approach presented in this module will make you appreciate the productivity improvements brought by ATL (and Visual Studio ATL Wizards).

In the final module I introduce you to an IContextMenu-based technique for building context-menu shell extensions. There are pros and cons in using IExecuteCommand vs. IContextMenu. For example, while IContextMenu is available in Windows XP, IExecuteCommand is a Win7+ COM interface. So, if you need to develop a context-menu shell extension that supports XP, you have to use IContextMenu.

Moreover, while IExecuteCommand simplifies some common operations, more advanced techniques like building fancy UIs in the context-menu (for example, implementing owner-drawn menu items) require the use of IContextMenu and its later incarnations (like IContextMenu3).

I hope you enjoy the course.