As it is always important to be careful in online media postings, there are some beneficial techniques are noted at the Learnvest site, that can help clean-up prior history: 

http://www.learnvest.com/2016/02/surviving-a-social-media-disaster-at-work/

Whether it’s a celebrity Twitter feud or a corporate social media disaster, we’ve all seen how online posts can flare up into huge news. But you don’t need to have started an international career-ending media storm to have your online presence wreak havoc on your professional life.

In fact, the National Labor Relations Board has ruled in recent years that employers can justifiably fire you for comments you make on social media, even if they had nothing to do with work. Meanwhile, a 2015 CareerBuilder survey found that 48% of hiring managers have found something on a potential hire’s social media account (such as inappropriate photos or discriminatory comments) that caused them to pass on that candidate.

So what do you do if you’re feeling a bad case of social-media remorse? We asked a few experts to outline the steps to take if you find you need to do some damage control and reclaim control of your online brand

Step 1: Figure Out ASAP Who’s Likely to See and Take Issue With Your Social Media posting
Step 2: Get Rid of the Evidence – Deleting
Step 3: Apologize, As Needed
Step 4: Scrub Your Social Media
Step 5: Reinvent Your Online Self

So here’s a quick cheat sheet on how to do that across some of the most common social media platforms:

Facebook: Go to your Activity Log. From there, you can delete a post, hide it from your timeline or untag yourself from any questionable photos. (Better yet, ask your best buds if they’re willing to delete any photos of you that they posted.) For further control, you can enable your privacy settings to review posts or photos your friends tag you in before they hit your public timeline.

Twitter: Go to your tweets, open the offending tweet, choose the ellipsis symbol and hit “Delete Tweet.”

Instagram: Go to the incriminating photo, tap the ellipsis shown beneath it and hit “delete.”

LinkedIn: Go to the regrettable update and hover your cursor over the time stamp on your update. You’ll see the option to delete in the drop down menu.

Google+: Click on the post you wish never existed, click on the menu icon (the three vertical dots) and select “delete” from the drop-down menu.