With help from a mobile security firm, the FBI have broken into the iPhone for San Bernardino crimial case.

http://www.networkworld.com/article/3048731/fbi-hack-may-raise-questions-about-iphone-security.html

The FBI hack of an iPhone 5c running iOS 9 may have left the device just a little bit insecure in the eyes of some users, as the agency has not provided details of how it was able to access data on the phone used by the San Bernardino terrorist.

On Monday, the FBI told the court that the government had successfully accessed the data stored on the iPhone used by Syed Rizwan Farook and no longer required the assistance it was demanding in court from Apple.  But the FBI did not disclose in the court filing whether it would pass the information on the hack to Apple, raising questions whether there is a vulnerability in the device that Apple may not know about.

http://fortune.com/2016/03/29/apple-fbi-cracked-iphone/

A sampling of the latest statements circulated about the case:

Department of Justice: “The government has now successfully accessed the data stored on Farook’s iPhone and therefore no longer requires the assistance from Apple.”

Apple: “We will continue to help law enforcement with their investigations, as we have done all along, and we will continue to increase the security of our products as the threats and attacks on our data become more frequent and more sophisticated.”

Edward Snowden: “Journalists: please remember that the government argued for months that this was impossible, despite expert consensus.”

Cybersecurity commentator Errata Security: “I doubt the technique was the NAND mirroring one many have described, or the well-known “decapping” procedure that has a 30% of irretrievably destroying the data. Instead, I think it was an [zero day] or jailbreak. Those two communities are pretty large, and this is well within their abilities.”

Blogger Ben Thompson: “No one comes out of this looking good. Whatever alleged ‘marketing benefit’ Apple achieved from selling secure phones has to be dinged by the fact this phone was broken into; meanwhile the FBI not only didn’t get the precedent that Apple and other companies ought to help them, but also look rather foolish and incompetent.”