Archive for October 5th, 2016

Leadership – Consistency is key approach for Time Management

To achieve long-range objectives over time, there must be a pattern of consistency or the day-to-day distractions will impact the overall success of the team.

http://www.johnmaxwell.com/blog/consistency-a-wise-investment-of-time

Have you ever considered the time investment in some of the world’s greatest achievements?

* It took 26 months to build the Eiffel Tower.
* It took Da Vinci 4 years to paint the Mona Lisa.
* It took Michelangelo 4 years to paint the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel.
* It took Leo Tolstoy over 6 years to write War and Peace.
* It took around 30 years to build the Great Pyramid.

And I get impatient if microwave popcorn takes too long! Joking aside, I love this list because it reminds me of just what can be accomplished when a person invests time wisely. Time is the one commodity each person gets in equal measure. As songwriter Chris Rice once wrote, “Every day is a bank account, and time is our currency. No one’s rich, nobody’s poor – we get 24 hours each.”

Yet so many of us don’t invest time wisely. We spend many of the hours we’re given each day on things that bring us no return. According to the website Digital Trends, Americans now spend an average of 4.7 hours a day looking at social media on their phones. Take a moment and re-read that, because it’s an amazing statistic.

Consistency — All of this can be avoided with the habit of consistency. Consistency in this case means you give a little bit of time to each area every day, and stick with it. It won’t feel like much at first, but it’s the discipline to stick with it that yields not only the tangible results of the investment, but the internal rewards as well. You learn to increase the time you give each area. You become more aware of how you’re wasting time. You get sharper, smarter, and more focused as a result.

Google – Chromecast Ultra offers 4K video

This PC Magazine article compares and contrasts Chromecast Ultra ($69) with the current lower priced Chromecast steaming device ($35) 

http://www.pcmag.com/news/348458/google-chromecast-vs-chromecast-ultra-whats-the-differenc

http://www.pcmag.com/news/348454/google-unveils-4k-chromecast-ultra

OVERVIEW — At $69, Google’s new Chromecast Ultra costs nearly twice as much as the regular Chromecast $35 at Best Buy, a PCMag Editors’ Choice for its price and features. We’ll know whether the Chromecast Ultra is a worthy upgrade when we get it in the lab for testing, but until then here are the main distinctions we can identify.

The Big Difference: 4K — Ultra high definition (UHD or 4K) video is the main feature that bumps the Chromecast Ultra above the regular Chromecast. Chromecast Ultra can output streaming video at 3,840 by 2,160, while the regular Chromecast is limited to 1,920 by 1,080. That’s four times as many pixels and the new standard for the latest original shows on Netflix and Hulu.

HDR Support — Besides just the higher resolution, the Chromecast Ultra also supports high dynamic range (HDR) video. HDR video not only has more pixels than standard 1080p video, but each pixel can cover a wider and more granular range of color and light output. If you have a television that can handle it (and that’s not all 4K TVs), it looks stunning.

Ethernet Alternative — The Chromecast Ultra includes an Ethernet adapter, so you can plug the device directly into your router or modem for the strongest, fastest network connection. Streaming video is pretty reliable over Wi-Fi if you have a good router, but a wired connection ensures even more speed and reliability, and that can be the key between whether Netflix actually sends a 4K HDR signal to your television or whether it throttles down to 1080p because it thinks that’s all your network can handle.

More Power — According to Google, Chromecast Ultra is simply faster than the Chromecast. The distinction is “ultra fast load times” compared with “fast load times.” Whether there actually is a noticeable difference is a question we can’t answer until we test the new device.