On the Lambda

Programming, Technology, and Systems Administration

On the Lambda

Entries Tagged as 'networking'

Tracking through Lightspeed: Complexity vs Reliability

December 18th, 2017 · No Comments · networking, non-computer, servers

If you haven’t yet seen “The Last Jedi” and don’t want part of it spoiled, you may want to give this one a pass. I’m going to focus on how a scene from the movie relates to current technology. In the “The Last Jedi”, part of the plot revolves around trying to shut down a […]

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Supporting Outlook with G Suite

May 4th, 2017 · No Comments · IT News, networking, security

Where I’m at, we use Google Apps (G Suite) for e-mail, but still rely on Active Directory for individual accounts and use MS Office rather than Google Docs most of the time. One situation to come up in the last few years is Google no longer supports MS Outlook out of the box. If you […]

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What are “Less Secure Apps” in Google?

May 4th, 2017 · No Comments · IT News, security

If you’ve tried to use Outlook or another traditional e-mail client with GMail, you may have run into this requirement to enable “Less Secure Apps”. There are other situations that may prompt you to turn this on, as well. What does that mean? Why does it matter? I think I can explain. Google, by default, […]

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The Missing DHCP snap-in for Windows 10 Remote Server Administration Tools

November 6th, 2015 · 4 Comments · .net, c#, development, networking, Powershell, servers

If you’re used to managing Windows Servers, you’re likely familiar with the Windows Server Remote Administration Tools. These tools are packaged as a download for each client (not server) version of Windows. They provide the same set of MMC snap-ins you’ll find on a server, such as Active Directory Users and Computers, DNS, or Group […]

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Cleaning an Infected Computer at Work

September 23rd, 2014 · No Comments · security, superuser

I have two basic philosophies underpinning how I approach infected computers. To begin with, I don’t really believe in cleaning an infected computer at all. I could cover the reasoning for this in more detail, but I already have a well-voted answer on SuperUser.com that I think says it better than I could fit here. For computers […]

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The N Word

May 9th, 2014 · No Comments · sql, Sql Server

No, not that N word. I’m talking about N string literal prefixes in T-SQL. Like this: SELECT * FROM Foo WHERE Bar = N’Baz’ If you don’t know what that N is for, it tells Sql Server that your string literal is an nvarchar, rather than a varchar… that is, that the string literal may […]

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Secure WiFi is Broken

November 20th, 2013 · No Comments · networking, Uncategorized, wifi

Today, I’m offering you a challenge. Go out and find a public wifi network that offers encryption without making you log in. I dare you. Unfortunately, this endeavor is doomed to failure. WiFi as it exists today makes it virtually impossible to offer such a thing. I find myself in the business of managing a […]

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What I did Last Night

January 26th, 2013 · No Comments · networking

Last night (or, rather, much too early this morning) I had the privilege to change out the old core network switch (a stacked pair of 3Com 4900SX’s) at the college where I work for a shiny new HP 5406zl. I started at about 2am, and as I sit in Starbucks typing this it’s now past 10am and […]

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AppleTV vs AirServer in the Classroom

September 24th, 2012 · 3 Comments · networking

AirPlay is fast becoming the go-to protocol for wireless display purposes. There is software to support mirroring your display to a device such as an AppleTV from iOS, OS X, PC, and even Android. In addition to the AppleTV, there are a number of other options to host a mirrored screen. This includes any device capable of running […]

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Are Client Access Licenses Enforceable?

January 5th, 2012 · No Comments · servers

One of the less-fun aspects of managing Microsoft Windows servers is dealing with the Client Access Licenses (CALs).  CALs aren’t only expensive, but with different licensing models (per seat, per user, per machine, etc) and different versions (CALs bought for Server 2003 are no good for your beefy new 2008 R2 box) they are also […]

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